Topics

Fantasy

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 144

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 144: Jonathan McIntosh on the influence of St. Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical ideas on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien; Kevin Vost on the history of thinking about friendship in Patristic and Medieval Christian thought; Malcolm Guite on wisdom from Samuel Taylor Coleridge about reason and the imagination; R. David Cox on the influence of the Virginia Episcopalian tradition on the religious life of Robert E. Lee; Grant Brodrecht on why Civil War-era evangelicals in the North placed such a high value on preserving the Union; and Peter Bouteneff on the theological richness of the music of Arvo Pärt.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 117

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 117: Matthew Dickerson, on the likenesses between Beowulf and three of Tolkien’s heroes, and on how (despite Peter Jackson’s rendition) The Lord of the Rings is more interested in virtue than in military exploits; Jennifer Woodruff Tait, on how assumptions about the nature of moral knowledge—derived from the school of common-sense realism—compelled Victorian Methodists and others to substitute grape juice for wine in celebrating the Lord’s Supper; Jeffry Davis and Philip Ryken, on why the liberal arts ought to be recognized as a calling that enriches Christian living; and Robert George, on the consequences of redefining marriage.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 17

Maker of Middle-Earth

Available for mp3 purchase
While it is not a story set in the twentieth century, Tom Shippey (author of J. R. R. Tolkien: Author of the Century) claims that The Lord of the Rings is very much a work of the twentieth century; the momentum of evil sweeps characters into action before they understand the events in which they are involved. Joseph Pearce (author of Tolkien: Man and Myth) defends The Lord of the Rings fantasy genre against those who would claim that realistic fiction is a better vessel for truth; because mythology is stripped of the factual, he explains, it can deal with truth unencumbered and therefore convey its moral more directly. Literary critic Ralph C. Wood explains why he has been drawn to J. R. R. Tolkien's moral Middle-Earth since his first reading of The Lord of the Rings in the 1960s. It is a world ordered by heroism, friendship, loyalty, and hope. These ties alone, he states, enable the hobbits to complete their quest and go where no one else can. 86 minutes. $6.