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Industrial Revolution

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 93

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 93: Alan Jacobs, on practical consequences of belief in original sin (and the five distinct components of that belief); James A. Herrick, on redemptive myths advanced by science fiction and speculative science and on evolution as a religion; J. Daryl Charles, on the commitment by the magisterial Reformers to the idea of natural law; Robert C. Roberts, on the role of emotions in ethical and spiritual life; Allan C. Carlson, on how the industrial revolution changed the shape of households (including their floorplans) and the understanding of marriage; and Sheila O'Connor-Ambrose, on the work of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese in defending marriage against the various claims of individualism.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 43

Guests on Volume 43: Jedediah Purdy, on the ironic mood and its effect on public life; Lendol Calder, on the cultural significance of consumer credit; John Nelson, on Soli Deo Gloria, commissioning sacred classical works; George Arasimowicz, on crafting a tone poem about the life of Peter; James Calvin Schaap, on writing and the challenge to piety; Frederick Buechner, on the ministry of memoirs and the importance of remembering; Kay Hymowitz, on mistaken ideas of adulthood and childhood; and Calvin Stapert, on My Only Comfort: Death, Deliverance, and Discipleship in the Music of Bach.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 3

Guests on Volume 3: Andrew Kimbrell, on the bioethical issues discussed in The Human Body Shop; Allan C. Carlson, on From Cottage to Workstation: The Family's Search for Social Harmony in the Industrial Age; Larry Woiwode, on Flannery O'Connor, John Updike, and what fiction is good for; Peter Kreeft, on the reasonableness of faith, the devilishness of deconstructionism, and The Snakebite Letters; Alan Jacobs, on The Children of Men by P. D. James; Thomas Morris, on Blaise Pascal and why people still ask the Big Questions; Jay Tolson, on how Walker Percy's search for authenticity led to his conversion; and John Hodges, on the popularity of Henryck Gorecki's Third Symphony.