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Intelligent Design

Areopagus Lecture 2

Simon Oliver: Creation, Modernity, & Public Theology

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Many contemporary discussions that make reference to creation are framed in light of assumed conflicts between science and religion and are frequently concerned with giving an account of the earth’s origins. But is talking about origins synonymous with what the church fathers meant by the act of creation? Does providing scientifically plausible accounts of how the earth began or pointing to staggering probabilities as evidence for intelligent design provide an adequate understanding of the relationship between God and creation? Do we as modern Christians truly understand what the church fathers meant by “nothing” in the phrase creation ex nihilo? In this Areopagus Lecture, Simon Oliver explains the traditional understanding of the doctrine of creation and how some of our modern divisions and disputes are products of an insufficient framework for creation that developed during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. $4.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 21

Science and Theology from the Bottom Up: Sir John Polkinghorne on Enriching the Dialogue

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In 1979, a much-respected physicist named John Polkinghorne resigned from his position at Cambridge. Just five years earlier he had been honored for his remarkable achievements in mathematical physics (he had been part of the team that discovered the quark) by being appointed a Fellow of the Royal Society. Polkinghorne was departing the environs of this profound and mysterious reflection on the nature of reality for a vocation no less intellectually and personally challenging: the study of theology and service as an Anglican priest. One of the benefits to the public of Polkinghorne’s twin interests in science and theology has been the remarkable series of books he has written since 1983, beginning with The Way the World Is, continuing with the publication of his 1993 Gifford Lectures (published as The Faith of a Physicist: Reflections of a Bottom-Up Thinker) and most recently Science and the Trinity: The Christian Encounter with Reality (Yale). Sir John Polkinghorne talks about the main themes of this book in this Conversation. 54 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 42

Guests on Volume 42: Michael Kammen, on the historical transition from popular to mass culture; Philip Fisher, on Still the New World: American Literature in a Culture of Creative Destruction; John Horgan, on the limits of neuroscience; William Dembski, on detecting intelligent design through "specified complexity"; Steven Garber, on the breadth of Michael Polanyi's thought; Dorothy Bass, on the need to restore form to our experience of time; Paul Vitz, on Faith of the Fatherless: The Psychology of Atheism; J. Budziszewski, on The Revenge of Conscience: Politics and the Fall of Man; and David Aikman, on the heroism of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 24

Guests on Volume 24: James Davison Hunter, on a survey about American political life conducted by the Post-Modernity Project; Robert H. Bork, on judicial complicity in the coarsening of America; Rochelle Gurstein, on how some advocates of unbridled free expression had second thoughts; Roger Shattuck, on how we've lost the ability to recognize the fact that some knowledge is bad for us; Michael Behe, on how complexity in cells suggests an intelligent designer; David Morgan, on the Paintings of Warner Sallman; and Ted Libbey, on Gabriel Fauré's Requiem.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 7

Guests on Volume 7: Dean Kenyon, on his fight for academic freedom at San Francisco State University; Phillip Johnson, on scientists' intolerance toward theories about intelligent design; Jane Metcalfe, on technology and community; John Hodges, on sacred music by Ralph Vaughan Williams; Dominic Aquila, on the late cultural critic, Christopher Lasch; Robert Royal, on "Reinventing the American People," multiculturalism and the shaping of national identity; Ted Prescott, on the British realist painter Lucian Freud; and Drew Trotter, on Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning Schindler's List.