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Liberalism

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 146

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Guests on Volume 146: Mark Mitchell, on liberalism’s false metaphysical claims about purpose, human nature, and tradition; Hans Boersma, on the cultural implications of the beatific vision; Henry T. Edmondson, III, on Flannery O’Connor’s understanding of political life; Brian Clayton and Douglas Kries, on the common and faulty assumption that faith and reason cannot be reconciled; Conor Sweeney, on wrestling with the ‘death of God’ with the help of hobbit wisdom, religious experience, and sacramental theology; and Carole Vanderhoof, on the creative, intelligent, and demanding integrity of Dorothy L. Sayers.

Areopagus Lecture 6

D. C. Schindler: “For Freedom Set Free”

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Philosopher D. C. Schindler discusses the Christian notion of religious liberty as a synthesis of the Jewish, Roman, and Greek traditions. In the Jewish tradition, one receives a theological understanding of freedom understood as freedom from bondage and from sin in order to more fully enter into a loving covenant with God. In the Roman tradition, freedom exists in relation to one’s membership within a polis and is established through legal codes. This objective political presence is internalized and personalized through the education of virtuous citizens. And in the Greek tradition, freedom is understood in relation to nature, on the one hand through membership in a tribe by kinship, and on the other hand, through participation in the Good, which is at the source of all being. Christianity, argues Schindler, is precisely the “receiving, healing, and transforming [of these] three distinct traditions” and Christian freedom is their “flourishing integration.” $4

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 138

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Guests on Volume 138: John Milbank, on why politics needs to recognize the human soul (and what happens when it doesn’t); Adrian Pabst, on the “metacrisis” of liberalism; Glenn Olsen, on Christopher Dawson’s understanding of religion and culture; Rupert Shortt, on how scientism misunderstands God and divine action; Oliver O'Donovan, on the significance of love, community, and friendship as ethical and eschatological categories; and David Bentley Hart, on the hazards and delights of translating the New Testament.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 112

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Guests on Volume 112: Christian Smith, on why "emerging adults" feel compelled to keep all their options open, in life and in thought; David L. Schindler, on how modern liberalism fails to acknowledge the reality of God's love in the order of Creation; Sara Anson Vaux, on the moral vision of director Clint Eastwood; Melvyn Bragg, on the origins and profound cultural influence of the King James Bible; Timothy Larsen, on how Victorians were united in their preoccupation with the Bible, whether or not they believed in God; and Ralph C. Wood, on the sacramental vision of G. K. Chesterton, and on the enigmatic message of The Man Who Was Thursday.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 110

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Guests on Volume 110: Kevin Belmonte, on how G. K. Chesterton embraced a "defiant joy" in spite of the cynical pessimism of many of his contemporaries; David Lyle Jeffrey and Gregory Maillet, on why Christians cannot afford to regard literature as a mere entertaining diversion; Mark Noll, on what motivates anti-intellectualism among Christians and why it is a theologically indefensible prejudice; Alan Jacobs, on W. H. Auden's understanding of the vocation of "poet" and on the spiritual and historical background to Auden's 1947 book-length poem, The Age of Anxiety; and Jonathan Chaplin, on the outlines and sources of the social and political thought of Herman Dooyeweerd and on his understanding of the relationship between theology and Christian philosophy.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 97

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Guests on Volume 97: Mark Noll, on how Christian higher education is aided by a commitment to something like "Christendom," a commitment to the assumption that the Gospel has consequences for all of life and all of social experience; Stanley Fish, on how university professors should refrain from bringing their own political, philosophical, and religious commitments into the classroom; James Peters, on how Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Pascal, and many others had an understanding of the nature and purpose of reason quite different from the common modern understanding; Scott Moore, on cultivating an understanding of politics that goes beyond mere statecraft, and on the limits of the notion of "rights"; and Makoto Fujimura, on how his work as a painter is enriched by writing, why artists need to cultivate an attentiveness to many things, and how visual language expresses experience.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 71

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Guests on Volume 71: Peter Augustine Lawler, on Luther, Locke, liberty, and the American Founding Fathers; David Koyzis, on the modern denial of objective meaning and the exaltation of individual will; Roger Lundin, on the incarnational vision of Czeslaw Milosz, and on his poetry of exile and modern boundlessness; Craig Gay, on how the nature of money affects our sense of attributing value to things; Steven Rhoads, on Taking Sex Differences Seriously (and why it's hard to do so); and R. Larry Todd, on the life and music of Felix Mendelssohn.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 64

Guests on Volume 64: Paul Berman, on the links between Islamism and other totalitarian utopias; Jean Bethke Elshtain, on justice and the vocation of government, and on maintaining a sense of the holy; Hadley Arkes, on natural rights and "inadvertant treason," and on the rise of a new jurisprudence in Griswold v. Connecticut and Roe v. Wade; Ralph C. Wood, on the place of the seven virtues in J. R. R. Tolkien's vision of the moral life in The Lord of the Rings; and Jeremy Begbie, on what we learn about time, theology, and the structure of creation from the experience of music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 56

Guests on Volume 56: Miroslav Volf, on Practicing Theology: Beliefs and Practices in Christian Life; J. Judd Owen, on liberal democracy and the taming of religion; David Jacobson, on citizenship and belonging to a place; Belden Lane, on Landscapes of the Sacred: Geography and Narrative in American Spirituality; Alister McGrath, on the doctrine of Creation and the tasks of culture; Don W. King, on the poetry of C. S. Lewis; Edward Norman, on the logic of secularization; and Peter Augustine Lawler, on the proper meaning of postmodernism and “Bobos” and the end of history.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 54

Guests on Volume 54: Robert P. Kraynak, on Christian Faith and Modern Democracy: God and Politics in the Fallen World; Mitchell L. Stevens, on home schooling and the individuality of children; Ralph C. Wood, on the Christian achievement of detective novelist P. D. James; Mark Henrie, on the films of Whit Stillman and the overcoming of irony; Terry Lindvall, on the responses of American churches to the advent of motion pictures; Richard J. Mouw, on sin, culture, and common grace; and Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, on her book In Quiet Light: Poems on Vermeer's Women.

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