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MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 22

Hillbilly Thomist: Flannery O'Connor & the Truth of Things

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In this Conversation, Ken Myers talks with Susan Srigley about how Flannery O’Connor’s perception of reality suffuses her fiction in ways that fit the views of how art works developed by Thomas Aquinas, views often summarized as “sacramental” or “incarnational.” And Ralph Wood discusses O’Connor’s acceptance of the limits placed in our lives by Providence, how limits may be a source of wisdom rather than frustration. 60 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 73

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Guests on Volume 73: Richard John Neuhaus, Nigel Cameron, Carlos F. Gomez, and Michael Uhlmann, on the meaning and value of human life, the vocation of medicine, the logic of autonomous individualism, and the temptation of suicide and euthanasia; Patrick Carey, on the perceptive (and peregrinating) thought of Orestes Brownson; John W. O'Malley, on the prophetic, academic, humanistic, and artistic vectors of Western culture; Patricia Owen, on what makes good children's books and on how the Newbery Medal winners have changed over time; Susan Srigley, on the sacramental and incarnational fiction of Flannery O'Connor; and Ralph C. Wood, on Flannery O'Connor as "hill-billy Thomist" and sympathizer with backwoods religion.

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 5

The Christian Mind of C.S. Lewis

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In this Anthology, Ken Myers talks with Clyde Kilby about Lewis’s view of the imagination; with Michael Aeschliman about Lewis’s reasonable distrust of trusting reason too much; with James Como about the rhetorical genius in Lewis’s writing; with Bruce L. Edwards, Jr. about what his students learn from Lewis’s integration of faith and life; with Thomas Howard about the deep meaning of Till We Have Faces; and with Gilbert Meilaender about the surprising approach of Lewis’s apologetics. The program concludes with Alan Jacobs’s reading of his 1998 essay, “Lewis at 100.” 73 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 70

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Guests on Volume 70: W. Wesley McDonald, on the significance of Russell Kirk’s themes of the "permanent things" and "the moral imagination"; C. Ben Mitchell, on law, wisdom, and the possibilities of pastoral guidance on bioethical decisions, and on why and how the Church should be more welcoming toward the elderly; Carl Elliott, on the medical industry’s move from healing to enhancing self-esteem and idenity formation; Richard Weikart, on the rise of "evolutionary ethics," the embrace toward ethical relativism, and the slide toward eugenics; Christine Rosen, on how and why early 20th century American religious leaders encouraged eugenics in the name of moral progress; and Dana Gioia, on the decline in literary reading in America and on the cultural loss it signifies.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 66

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Guests on Volume 66: Leon Kass, on how various biotechnologies promise to fulfill certain legitimate human desires in illegitimate ways, and on how new technologies have changed the assumptions many people have about their children; Nigel Cameron, on why American churches have been negligent in promoting robust thinking about the current bioethical crisis; Susan Wise Bauer, on how adults can acquire many of the benefits of a classical education long after leaving school by reading wisely and well; Esther Lightcap Meek, on belief, doubt, certainty, authority, and how knowledge (of God and other matters) is acquired, sustained, and properly recognized; John Shelton Lawrence, on how John Wayne, Clint Eastwood, Superman, and the governor of California all embody a great American myth; and Ralph C. Wood, on the disappointing discrepancies between Peter Jackson's films and J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 55

Guests on Volume 55: John Kelsay, on Islam, the West, and the threat of secularism; Robert George, on Oliver Wendell Holmes and the rise of legal realism; Michael McConnell, on Christian responses to the dominant theories of law in the 20th century; Mark Noll, on The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity; J. C. Whitehouse, on Georges Bernanos and the mystery of the human person; and Paul Woodruff, on recovering the virtue of reverence.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 52

Guests on Volume 52: Tom Shippey, on J. R. R. Tolkien: Author of the Century; Jeffrey Meyers, on George Orwell’s illuminating use of language; Ralph McInerny, on natural theology and the "subjective turn" in philosophy; Daniel Ritchie, on William Cowper and how we know the world; Ian Ker, on John Henry Newman and the purpose of education; Mark Schwehn, on teaching, community, and virtue; Gilbert Meilaender, on ways to think about work; and Tiina Nunnally, on the prose of Sigrid Undset.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 50

Guests on Volume 50: Stanley Carlson-Thies, on the theology of "charitable choice"; Bruce S. Thornton, on the loss of ends and the exultation of appetite in the academy; A. J. Conyers, on the origins of the modern view of tolerance (and of Big Government); Stanton L. Jones, on various configurations of science, morality, and homosexuality; Arthur Holmes, on the history of Christianity and education in the liberal arts; Carson Holloway, on All Shook Up: Music, Passion, and Politics; Ted Prescott, on the popular paintings and the prophetic claims of Thomas Kinkade; and Glenn C. Arbery, on the achievement of form in literature.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 41

Guests on Volume 41: Harry Blamires, on resisting secularism; David Healy, on antidepressants and the concept of disease; Christine Pohl, on the modern challenges to the practice of hospitality; Paul Gutjahr, on the changing place of the Bible in American culture; Francis Fukuyama, on human nature and the shape of moral community; Paul Corby Finney, on visual arts and the Calvinist tradition; and J. A. C. Redford, on Christmas Music and the Incarnation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 37

Guests on Volume 37: Gregory Wolfe, on how "religious humanism" follows the model of the incarnation; Jill P. Baumgaertner, on violence and the grotesque in Flannery O'Connor; D. Bruce Lockerbie, on the struggle of many modern writers against religion; Roger Lundin, on Alfred Kazin's God and the American Writer; Donald McCullough, on the religious rootedness of courtesy; David Nye, on how technologies build cultural momentum in unexpected ways; Kathleen Powers Erickson, on the Spiritual Vision of Vincent Van Gogh; and Michael Marissen, on how J. S. Bach avoided anti-Judaism.

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