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Literature

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 23

Guests on Volume 23: John Steadman Rice, on how the idea of codependency is based on tenets of "liberation psychotherapy"; E. D. Hirsch, Jr., on The Schools We Need and Why We Don't Have Them; Ted McAllister, on Revolt Against Modernity: Leo Strauss, Eric Voeglin, and the Search for a Postliberal Order; Judith Skelton Grant, on Robertson Davies: Man of Myth; Terry Teachout, on why music should not be propagandistic; John Boyle, on his Requiem for the Unborn; Leland Ryken, on what makes a classic and how we should read one; and Daniel Ritchie, on a Biblical view of language and literature.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 18

Guests on Volume 18: Leigh Eric Schmidt, on how the marketplace has shaped American celebration of the holidays; John Patrick Diggins, on how pragmatism fails to offer a coherent way of understanding of the world; Joseph Frank, on moral themes in the fiction of Fyodor Dostoevsky; Thomas Howard, on the supernatural thrillers of Charles Williams; Ken Myers, on Marsalis on Music, a book and a video series on music appreciation; Deal Hudson, on the themes of family in the work of Sigrid Undset, author of Kristin Lavransdatter and The Master of Hestviken; George McKenna, on how President Lincoln might have fought abortion; and Ted Libbey, on master English composer Henry Purcell.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 11

Guests on Volume 11: Richard Skolnik, on Baseball and the Pursuit of Innocence: A Fresh Look at the Old Ball Game; Laura Nash, on the influence of religious faith in the marketplace; Dick Keyes, on heroism, character, and the imitation of Christ; Douglas LeBlanc, on musings on mortality by the Crash Test Dummies; Ken Myers, on Michael Moore's TV Nation and terminal irony in prime time; Gene Edward Veith, on communicating truth to a cynical age; Alan Jacobs, on Chinua Achebe and the dilemma of living between two cultures; and Ted Libbey, on Beethoven's Missa Solemnis.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 2

The Public Poetry of W. H. Auden

Available for mp3 purchase
Literary critic Alan Jacobs talks about how W. H. Auden returned to the Church after recognizing that liberal humanism had no answers to the problem of human evil. He also discusses the social themes in Auden's poetry, which avoided utopianism and apocalypticism. 58 minutes. $6.

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