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Love

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 112

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 112: Christian Smith, on why "emerging adults" feel compelled to keep all their options open, in life and in thought; David L. Schindler, on how modern liberalism fails to acknowledge the reality of God's love in the order of Creation; Sara Anson Vaux, on the moral vision of director Clint Eastwood; Melvyn Bragg, on the origins and profound cultural influence of the King James Bible; Timothy Larsen, on how Victorians were united in their preoccupation with the Bible, whether or not they believed in God; and Ralph C. Wood, on the sacramental vision of G. K. Chesterton, and on the enigmatic message of The Man Who Was Thursday.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 96

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 96: David A. Smith, on the beginnings of the National Endowment for the Arts and the capacity of the arts in a democracy for combatting atomistic individualism; Kiku Adatto, on how images, words, and ideas interact in a visually saturated culture and on how the image of a person's face in a photograph has the capacity for intimate representation of inner personhood; Elvin T. Lim, on how presidential speeches have been dumbed down for decades and why presidents like it; David Naugle, on the deeper meaning of happiness, the disordering effects of sin, and the reordering of love made possible in our redemption; Richard Stivers, on the technologizing of all of life; and John Betz, on the critique of the Enlightenment offered by Johann Georg Hamann (1730-1788), and why it still matters to us.

MARS HILL AUDIO Report 4

Wandering toward the Altar: The Decline of American Courtship

Available for mp3 purchase
Much public attention is given to the decline of marriage and the family in America, but few have thought to relate this decline to the changing ways in which Americans understand and practice courtship. The cultural wisdom and conventions that once guided young men and women in their efforts to find and win suitable partners for marriage are vanishing. Modesty and sexual restraint are ridiculed, while previously stigmatized behaviors such as casual sexual "hook-ups" and premarital cohabitation have become commonplace. Wandering tyoward the Altar explores the broader cultural changes behind the end of traditional American courtship, including the rise of youth culture and dating; the demise of the productive family household; careerism and the later age of first marriage; the replacement of romantic imagination with youthful cynicism about love and marriage; and the exclusion of home and family from the practices of courting. This program features studio interviews with Leon and Amy Kass, Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, Wendy Shalit, Allan C. Carlson, Beth Bailey, Steven Nock, Kay Hymowitz, and Douglas Wilson, as well as extensive field reporting. Available in downloadable MP3 format (burnable to 4 standard CDs). 4.5 hours. $15.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 30

Guests on Volume 30: Glenn Stanton, on the health of marriages and the health of society; Caroline J. Simon, on love, destiny, and imagination; Paul Marshall, on the theological meaning of vocation; David Lowenthal, on American Constitutional design and the need for virtue; Reinder Van Til, on Lost Daughters: Recovered Memory Therapy and the People It Hurts; John Ellis, on Literature Lost: Social Agendas and the Corruption of the Humanities; and Clyde Kilby, on C. S. Lewis and the roles of reason and imagination.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 17

Guests on Volume 17: Alan Jacobs, on the seafaring fiction of novelist Patrick O'Brian; Barry Sanders, on the deeper dynamics of literacy; Mark Slouka, on bizarre Gnostic temptations in cyberspace; Alan Ehrenhalt, on how valuing choice hurts community; Geoffrey T. Holtz, on twenty-somethings and the shape of family life; Mardi Keyes, on dubious assumptions about the nature of adolescence; W. Bradford Wilcox, on tradition and belief; Glenn Loury, on race and relationships; and John Hodges, on the influence of Russian Orthodoxy in the music of John Tavener.