Topics

Marriage--Law

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 86

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 86: Roger Lundin on why, after Vietnam, American literary critics forgot about American religion; Lawrence Buell, on diverse visions of America and Nature; Harold K. Bush, Jr., on the glorification of the American way as a civil religion; Roger Lundin, on the transformation of the nature of belief in the late 19th century; Katherine Shaw Spaht, on radical autonomy, marriage, divorce, and law; Steven L. Nock, on how broadly shared cultural assumptions affect laws regulating marriage and divorce; Norman Klassen & Jens Zimmermann, on the Incarnation and humanism, and on how various dualisms affect our assumptions about faith, knowledge, and higher education.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 79

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 79: Carson Holloway on why sociobiology and evolutionary psychology are inadequate bases for sustaining political ideals; Peter Augustine Lawler on why we are more than "individuals" narrowly defined; Hadley Arkes on the difference, in law, between evidence from social scientific data and moral truths; Ben Witherington, III on why The Da Vinci Code's implausible account of history seems credible to many people; Christopher Shannon on Ivan Illich (Medical Nemesis) and the loss of belief in the possibility that suffering can be meaningful; Roger Lundin on how nature and experience replaced revelation as a source of authority (and why they fail to serve as such), and on the necessity of humility in writing biographies.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 34

Guests on Volume 34: Michael Aeschliman, on C. S. Lewis and the problem of scientism; Jeremy Rifkin, on The Biotech Century: Harnessing the Gene And Remaking the World; Jean Bethke Elshtain, on Vaclav Havel, identity politics, and the possibilities of democracy; Katherine Shaw Spaht, on the purposes of covenant marriage laws; Steven L. Nock, on why married couples divorce; Louise Cowan, on how classics address our imagination; Ramsey MacMullen, on the rise of Christendom; and Ted Libbey, on the music of Hildegard von Bingen.