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Modernity

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 63

Guests on Volume 63: Charles M. Sennott, on the dwindling Christian presence in the Middle East; Nicholas Orme, on the nature of childhood in the Middle Ages; J. Budziszewski, on the testimony of conscience and What We Can't Not Know; Albert Borgmann, on the necessity of deliberate reflection about how technology shapes everyday life; James A. Herrick, on The Making of the New Spirituality: The Eclipse of the Western Religious Tradition, and on Mormonism, gnosticism, and the significance of Luke Skywalker; Darrell Cole, on contemporary cynicism about the possiblity of justice and the just war tradition; and Jackson Lears, on the deeper cultural roots of contemporary attitudes toward gambling.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 57

Guests on Volume 57: John Hare, on why morality makes sense only on Christian grounds; Clifford Putney, on "muscular Christianity" and the origins of the YMCA; Andrei S. Markovits, on modernity, sports, and soccer in America; Wilmer Mills, on time, narrative, and the sequences of life, and on two of his poems; Steve Bruce, on diversity, individualism, secularization, and the atrophy of faith, and on why rational choice theory doesn't apply to religion; Colleen Carroll, on The New Faithful: Why Young Adults Are Embracing Christian Orthodoxy; and Michael Budde & Robert Brimlow, Christianity Incorporated, on why Christianity should seem strange.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 56

Guests on Volume 56: Miroslav Volf, on Practicing Theology: Beliefs and Practices in Christian Life; J. Judd Owen, on liberal democracy and the taming of religion; David Jacobson, on citizenship and belonging to a place; Belden Lane, on Landscapes of the Sacred: Geography and Narrative in American Spirituality; Alister McGrath, on the doctrine of Creation and the tasks of culture; Don W. King, on the poetry of C. S. Lewis; Edward Norman, on the logic of secularization; and Peter Augustine Lawler, on the proper meaning of postmodernism and “Bobos” and the end of history.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 53

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Guests on Volume 53: Lawrence Adams, on the possibilities of religious pluralism in Islamic views of state and society; Dana Gioia, on the craft, popularity, and significance of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; Elmer M. Colyer, on theologian Thomas F. Torrance's understanding of the Incarnation; R. A. Herrera, on how the Christian view of Creation and Incarnation shapes an understanding of history; Margaret Visser, on learning to recognize the deep meaning in the design of Christian churches; and Joseph Pearce, on Tolkien's other writings and on his view of myth and story.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 48

Guests on Volume 48: Jon Butler, on the United States as a modern society—in 1776; Gary Cross, on An All-Consuming Century: Why Commercialism Won in Modern America; Zygmunt Bauman, on the loss of permanence and solidity; Pico Iyer, on The Global Soul: Jet Lag, Shopping Malls, and the Search for Home; Richard Stivers, on sex and violence in media and the rule of technology; Larry Woiwode, on stories and giving form to experience; Alan Jacobs, on Philip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy; and James Trott, on poetry and piety.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 40

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Guests on Volume 40: Joseph Epstein, on writing essays and education through magazines; John Gray, on the cultural contradictions of global capitalism; Kenneth R. Craycraft, Jr., on why the First Amendment doesn't really protect Christian liberty; William T. Pizzi, on Trials without Truth: Why Our System of Criminal Trials Has Become an Expensive Failure and What We Need to Do to Rebuild It; Pamela Walker Laird, on how nineteeth-century advertising promoted progress; Albert Borgmann, on how technology disengages us from experiencing reality; Neal Stephenson, on the "eureka" moments with codes and computers; and Alan Jacobs, on why Harry Potter's magic shouldn't trouble Christians.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 38

Guests on Volume 38: Craig Gay, on how modern culture encourages atheism; Alvin Kernan, on why the academy can't afford to be too democratic; Erik Davis, on myth, magic, and mysticism in the age of information; Marva Dawn, on teaching children about being the Church; Wendy Shalit, on the lost virtue of female modesty; Marva Dawn, on sexual education and the Church's children; Leon Podles, on why men are often alienated from Christianity; and Dan Blazer, on the incomplete conversation between psychiatry and Christianity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 29

Guests on Volume 29: Richard John Neuhaus, on the recent judicial usurpation of democracy; John Patrick Diggins, on Max Weber's insights into democracy and leadership; Norman Cantor, on how postmodern culture resembles the baroque period; Alan Jacobs, on William Faulkner as a modernist and a Southerner; Charles Marsh, on the theological depth of the civil rights movement; David Park, on how pre-modern Christians understood light; and Ted Libbey, on Franz Schubert's role in inventing Romanticism.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 26

Guests on Volume 26: James Gilbert, on how science and religion negotiate for public respect; William Everdell, on the meaning and method of modernism; David Walsh, on the genius of liberal democracy; Alan Jacobs, on The Dictionary of Global Culture and "Real" Global Culture; Jeffrey Meikle, on American Plastic: A Cultural History; Jeffrey Burton Russell, on A History of Heaven: The Singing Silence; Roger Lundin, on Harry Mulisch's novel, The Discovery of Heaven; and Gordon Kreplin, on music, craft, gift, and beauty.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 23

Guests on Volume 23: John Steadman Rice, on how the idea of codependency is based on tenets of "liberation psychotherapy"; E. D. Hirsch, Jr., on The Schools We Need and Why We Don't Have Them; Ted McAllister, on Revolt Against Modernity: Leo Strauss, Eric Voeglin, and the Search for a Postliberal Order; Judith Skelton Grant, on Robertson Davies: Man of Myth; Terry Teachout, on why music should not be propagandistic; John Boyle, on his Requiem for the Unborn; Leland Ryken, on what makes a classic and how we should read one; and Daniel Ritchie, on a Biblical view of language and literature.

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