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MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 144

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Guests on Volume 144: Jonathan McIntosh on the influence of St. Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical ideas on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien; Kevin Vost on the history of thinking about friendship in Patristic and Medieval Christian thought; Malcolm Guite on wisdom from Samuel Taylor Coleridge about reason and the imagination; R. David Cox on the influence of the Virginia Episcopalian tradition on the religious life of Robert E. Lee; Grant Brodrecht on why Civil War-era evangelicals in the North placed such a high value on preserving the Union; and Peter Bouteneff on the theological richness of the music of Arvo Pärt.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 130

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Guests on Volume 130: Jacob Silverman, on the hidden costs of social media; Carson Holloway, on the neglected role of religious revelation within political science; Joseph Atkinson, on the sacramental and ontological foundations of marriage and family; Greg Peters, on the value of retrieving the theology and practices of Christian monasticism; Antonio López, on human nature and freedom in a technological culture; and Julian Johnson, on how Western music expresses the spirit of modernity.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 107

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Guests on Volume 107: Victor Lee Austin, on why authority is not a barrier to true freedom and is necessary for human flourishing (and will be forever); Ellen T. Charry, on why happiness has been underplayed in Christian theology (and why it shouldn't be); Anthony Esolen, on the explicit and implicit teaching that has caused many young people to be cynical and unhappy; Ferdinand Schlingensiepen, on the ambivalence of postwar Germans to the anti-Nazi resistance movement (and to Dietrich Bonhoeffer); Allen Verhey, on why it's dangerous to draw too stark a line between nature and supernature; and Calvin Stapert, on the historical, theological, and musical elements that combined to produce Handel's Messiah.

MARS HILL AUDIO Reprint 13

Robert R. Reilly, "The Music of the Spheres, or the Metaphysics of Music"

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(from The Intercollegiate Review, Fall 2001)

For 2500 years in the West, music was understood as a work of discovery, as an expression of something present in the structure of the cosmos. Despite changes in musical styles, the ways composers and musicians arranged melody, harmony, and rhythm were assumed to be expressive of some objective reality in the nature of things. As Robert R. Reilly summarizes this view, "Music was number made audible. Music was man's participation in the harmony of the universe." In the 20th century, that view was abandoned by courageous pioneers of the avant-garde, and "musical art was reduced to the arbitrary manipulation of fragments of sound." In this essay, Robert R. Reilly contrasts these two sets of assumptions about music, and introduces two 20th-century composers who rejected the metaphysics of chaos in their compositions: the Danish composer Vagn Holmboe (1909-1996) and the American John Adams (1947-). Read by Ken Myers. 43 minutes. $2.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 94

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Guests on Volume 94: Maggie Jackson, on how multitasking exalts efficiency and promises the overcoming of bodily limitations as time is restructured and on the importance of attentiveness in sustaining personal and social order; Mark Bauerlein, on how technologies have rearranged the social lives of teens (and their expectations of education); Tim Clydesdale, on what the first year in college means for teens; Andy Crouch, on the physical basis of cultural life and how "culture making" is done; and Jeremy Begbie, on how music is a way of engaging with the order in Creation and on how writing and hearing music involves a recognition of likenesses in Creation and the exercise of "hyper-hearing."

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 88

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Guests on Volume 88: Michael J. Lewis, on Body Worlds, human nature and Western Art; Diana Pavlac Glyer, on the influence of the Inklings on each others’ writings; Steve Talbott, on how the aims of education are distracted by technology; Darryl Tippens, on why we sing; Everett Ferguson, on the place of music in the Early Church; Alexander Lingas, on the tradition of music in the Eastern churches; and Calvin Stapert, on the nature of meaning in music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 65

Guests on Volume 65: Stephen G. Post, on why there should be more room for public forms of religious expression; Glenn C. Altschuler, on the advent of rock 'n' roll, and the various fears it created; Mark Oppenheimer, on the importance of style and the rise of radical informality; Johnny Cash, on faith, vocation, the Incarnation, and the Last Supper; George Marsden, on how Jonathan Edwards understood world history and the American experience; and Julian Johnson, on various misunderstandings about classical music, the differences between music as art and music as commodity, and on expectations of immediate gratification in music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 64

Guests on Volume 64: Paul Berman, on the links between Islamism and other totalitarian utopias; Jean Bethke Elshtain, on justice and the vocation of government, and on maintaining a sense of the holy; Hadley Arkes, on natural rights and "inadvertant treason," and on the rise of a new jurisprudence in Griswold v. Connecticut and Roe v. Wade; Ralph C. Wood, on the place of the seven virtues in J. R. R. Tolkien's vision of the moral life in The Lord of the Rings; and Jeremy Begbie, on what we learn about time, theology, and the structure of creation from the experience of music.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 53

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Guests on Volume 53: Lawrence Adams, on the possibilities of religious pluralism in Islamic views of state and society; Dana Gioia, on the craft, popularity, and significance of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; Elmer M. Colyer, on theologian Thomas F. Torrance's understanding of the Incarnation; R. A. Herrera, on how the Christian view of Creation and Incarnation shapes an understanding of history; Margaret Visser, on learning to recognize the deep meaning in the design of Christian churches; and Joseph Pearce, on Tolkien's other writings and on his view of myth and story.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 51

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Guests on Volume 51: Nigel Cameron, on the challenges of bioethics and how Christians ignore them; David Blankenhorn, on the public meaning of marriage and the private sector and the family; Robert Wuthnow, on creativity and faith; Mortimer Adler, on philosophical theism and How to Think about God; Roger Lundin, on the vision of William Blake; Dana Gioia, on the place of poetry and the way words work; Mary Midgley, on the ways science explains reality; and Ted Libbey, on the life and music of Edmund Rubbra.

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