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Music--Composers

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 129

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 129: Nicholas Carr, on how automation technologies make our lives easier — while detaching us from the practices of engaging the world that are most fulfilling for us; Robert Pogue Harrison, on the challenges of nurturing the inner lives and loves of our children to enable them to receive the legacies of our culture; R. J. Snell, on how the vice of acedia denies the being of Creation; Norman Wirzba, on how a Scriptural imagination allows us to perceive the world as Creation (not just as nature); Philip Zaleski and Carol Zaleski, on how the Inklings were critical of modernity in the interest of restoring Western culture to its Christian roots; and Peter Phillips, on the “tintinnabuli” style of composition in the works of Arvo Pärt.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 71

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 71: Peter Augustine Lawler, on Luther, Locke, liberty, and the American Founding Fathers; David Koyzis, on the modern denial of objective meaning and the exaltation of individual will; Roger Lundin, on the incarnational vision of Czeslaw Milosz, and on his poetry of exile and modern boundlessness; Craig Gay, on how the nature of money affects our sense of attributing value to things; Steven Rhoads, on Taking Sex Differences Seriously (and why it's hard to do so); and R. Larry Todd, on the life and music of Felix Mendelssohn.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 67

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 67: Eric O. Jacobsen, on urban churches and taking the concrete realities of community seriously; Allan C. Carlson, on the family in American culture and in government policy; Terence L. Nichols, on a sacramental view of Creation as an alternative to naturalism; R. R. Reno, on spiritual lethargy and sloth and the need for a more heroic vision for spiritual possibility; David Bentley Hart, on a Christian understanding of beauty rooted in the reality of the divine gift that is Creation; and J. A. C. Redford & Scott Cairns, on the making of "The Martyrdom of Polycarp."

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 47

Guests on Volume 47: Christopher Clausen, on detachment from normative communities in a post-cultural age; Don Eberly, on the meaning of and challenges for civil society; George Weigel, on Pope John Paul II's theology of embodiment and sexuality; Luci Shaw, on poetry that reminds us that Christ's suffering shadows over the celebration of the Incarnation; Steve Wilkens, on Christianity and Western Thought: A History of Philosophers, Ideas, and Movements; David Harvey, on place and spaces, public and private; John Durham Peters, on the utopianism present in the modern idea of communication; and Masaaki Suzuki, on the ways in which Bach's music is a vehicle for the Gospel.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 46

Guests on Volume 46: E. Michael Jones, on how horror films combat the assumptions of the Enlightenment; D. G. Hart, on The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education; Amy & Leon Kass, on training young people to imagine what love looks like; John Leax, on the challenges of wise "caretaking" in a fallen world; Richard Wilbur, on the ways in which words add "articulateness" to experience; Roger Lundin, on Richard Wilbur's commitment to the reality of creation; and Ted Libbey, on the intricate, theologically inspired structure of Bach's B Minor Mass.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 45

Guests on Volume 45: Jeff Speck, on how suburban sprawl prevents the formation of real neighborhoods; Victor Davis Hanson, on the demise of family farms and what it means for American democracy; Allan C. Carlson, on the contributions (and weaknesses) of 20th century agrarian thinkers; Paulina Borsook, on how Silicon Valley enshrines libertarian values; John F. Kilner, on possible strategies for rejecting cloning in the courts; Robert E. Webber, on Ancient-Future Faith: Rethinking Evangelicalism for a Postmodern World; and Christoph Wolff, on how J. S. Bach used music to pursue an understanding of God through creation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 43

Guests on Volume 43: Jedediah Purdy, on the ironic mood and its effect on public life; Lendol Calder, on the cultural significance of consumer credit; John Nelson, on Soli Deo Gloria, commissioning sacred classical works; George Arasimowicz, on crafting a tone poem about the life of Peter; James Calvin Schaap, on writing and the challenge to piety; Frederick Buechner, on the ministry of memoirs and the importance of remembering; Kay Hymowitz, on mistaken ideas of adulthood and childhood; and Calvin Stapert, on My Only Comfort: Death, Deliverance, and Discipleship in the Music of Bach.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 41

Guests on Volume 41: Harry Blamires, on resisting secularism; David Healy, on antidepressants and the concept of disease; Christine Pohl, on the modern challenges to the practice of hospitality; Paul Gutjahr, on the changing place of the Bible in American culture; Francis Fukuyama, on human nature and the shape of moral community; Paul Corby Finney, on visual arts and the Calvinist tradition; and J. A. C. Redford, on Christmas Music and the Incarnation.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 39

Guests on Volume 39: Neal Gabler, on how entertainment has become the highest value in our culture; C. John Sommerville, on How the News Makes Us Dumb: The Death of Wisdom in an Information Society; John L. Locke, on the value of personal interaction, and how technology is displacing it; Vigen Guroian, on gardening; Marion Montgomery, on how higher education has lost its way; Peter Berkowitz, on why liberal democracies need virtuous citizens; Harry Clor, on the need for the law to return to encouraging a public morality; and Ted Libbey, on French composer Francis Poulenc.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 34

Guests on Volume 34: Michael Aeschliman, on C. S. Lewis and the problem of scientism; Jeremy Rifkin, on The Biotech Century: Harnessing the Gene And Remaking the World; Jean Bethke Elshtain, on Vaclav Havel, identity politics, and the possibilities of democracy; Katherine Shaw Spaht, on the purposes of covenant marriage laws; Steven L. Nock, on why married couples divorce; Louise Cowan, on how classics address our imagination; Ramsey MacMullen, on the rise of Christendom; and Ted Libbey, on the music of Hildegard von Bingen.

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