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MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 143

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Guests on Volume 143: Mark Regnerus, on the effects of social changes in modernity on sexual behavior; Jessica Hooten Wilson, on the influence of Fyodor Dostoevsky on Walker Percy’s convictions and his approach to writing; John Henry Crosby, on the heroic witness borne by Dietrich von Hildebrand (1889-1977) in his philosophical writings and his battle against Nazism; John F. Crosby, on the influence of the schools of phenomenology and personalism in the thought of Dietrich von Hildebrand; Wynand de Beer, on lessons from Hellenic cosmology about the metaphysical questions raised by organic diversity and change; and Sørina Higgins, on the perennial appeal of the stories inspired by the figure of King Arthur, especially in the work of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, and Owen Barfield.

Areopagus Lecture 2

Simon Oliver: Creation, Modernity, & Public Theology

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Many contemporary discussions that make reference to creation are framed in light of assumed conflicts between science and religion and are frequently concerned with giving an account of the earth’s origins. But is talking about origins synonymous with what the church fathers meant by the act of creation? Does providing scientifically plausible accounts of how the earth began or pointing to staggering probabilities as evidence for intelligent design provide an adequate understanding of the relationship between God and creation? Do we as modern Christians truly understand what the church fathers meant by “nothing” in the phrase creation ex nihilo? In this Areopagus Lecture, Simon Oliver explains the traditional understanding of the doctrine of creation and how some of our modern divisions and disputes are products of an insufficient framework for creation that developed during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. $4.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 113

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Guests on Volume 113: Steven Shapin, on whether or not there is a single thing called "science," and whether scientists are united by a single "scientific method"; Arthur Boers, on why the ways in which technologies shape our lives should be recognized as spiritual and pastoral challenges; Christine Pohl, on why a deliberate commitment to certain shared practices is necessary for the sustaining of community; Norman Wirzba, on how attentiveness to our eating and our care of the land are central aspects of culture and of godly faith; Craig Bartholomew, on carelessness concerning embodied experience and our "crisis of place"; and David I. Smith, on how the forms of pedagogical practices ought to be crafted to correspond to the content of teaching.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 104

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Guests on Volume 104: James Le Fanu, on the mistaken assumption that modern medical science has eliminated the fittingness of a sense of mystery and wonder at the human mind and body; Garret Keizer, on how many noises in modern life reveal a state of warfare with the limitations of our embodiment; Daniel Ritchie, on how Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) and Isaac Watts (1674-1748) anticipated late twentieth-century critiques of the Enlightenment; Monica Ganas, on how the distinct vision of life embedded in "California-ism" has exerted a powerful cultural influence; Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, on how the search for faithfulness to Christ led him to the wisdom of the Benedictine Rule and a "new monasticism"; and Peter J. Leithart, on why Constantine has an unfairly bad reputation and on how his rule dealt a severe blow to paganism in the West.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 93

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Guests on Volume 93: Alan Jacobs, on practical consequences of belief in original sin (and the five distinct components of that belief); James A. Herrick, on redemptive myths advanced by science fiction and speculative science and on evolution as a religion; J. Daryl Charles, on the commitment by the magisterial Reformers to the idea of natural law; Robert C. Roberts, on the role of emotions in ethical and spiritual life; Allan C. Carlson, on how the industrial revolution changed the shape of households (including their floorplans) and the understanding of marriage; and Sheila O'Connor-Ambrose, on the work of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese in defending marriage against the various claims of individualism.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 25

The Heav'ns and All the Powers Therein: The Medieval Cosmos and the World of Narnia

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For decades, readers and scholars have wondered whether there was a Master Plan for the structure of the seven books in C. S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia. In his book Planet Narnia, Michael Ward makes a compelling case that the qualities attributed to the seven planets in the cosmology of antiquity and the Middle Ages are embodied in the seven books about Narnia. In this Conversation, Ward explains why Lewis thought the pre-Copernican view of the cosmos can still be of spiritual benefit, that although it may not be true in a factual sense, its beauty nonetheless reveals deeper truths. 67 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Conversation 21

Science and Theology from the Bottom Up: Sir John Polkinghorne on Enriching the Dialogue

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In 1979, a much-respected physicist named John Polkinghorne resigned from his position at Cambridge. Just five years earlier he had been honored for his remarkable achievements in mathematical physics (he had been part of the team that discovered the quark) by being appointed a Fellow of the Royal Society. Polkinghorne was departing the environs of this profound and mysterious reflection on the nature of reality for a vocation no less intellectually and personally challenging: the study of theology and service as an Anglican priest. One of the benefits to the public of Polkinghorne’s twin interests in science and theology has been the remarkable series of books he has written since 1983, beginning with The Way the World Is, continuing with the publication of his 1993 Gifford Lectures (published as The Faith of a Physicist: Reflections of a Bottom-Up Thinker) and most recently Science and the Trinity: The Christian Encounter with Reality (Yale). Sir John Polkinghorne talks about the main themes of this book in this Conversation. 54 minutes. $6.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 72

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Guests on Volume 72: John Polkinghorne, on lessons for theology learned from the inductive nature of the work of science; Francesca Aran Murphy, on the efforts of 20th-century Catholic and French philosopher Étienne Gilson to reconcile faith and reason; James Hitchcock, on the history of the Supreme Court's decisions regarding religious practice and liberty; Wilfred McClay, on Nathaniel Hawthorne's vision of the intractability of human failings and the possibilities of the American experiment, and on the theme of place and communal obligation in Nathaniel Hawthorne's writing; Philip McFarland, on how Hawthorne's sensitivity to the darker side of human nature makes him perennially instructive; and David Hackett Fischer, on the history of how Americans have understood and symbolized freedom and liberty.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 61

Guests on Volume 61: Ian Dowbiggin, on the history of the “right to die”movement; Arthur J. Dyck, on Life's Worth: The Case against Assisted Suicide; Daniel Dreisbach, on the building of Jefferson's "wall of separation"; Michael L. Peterson, on the elements of a Christian philosophy of education; Stephen Schwartz, on the differences between Balkan Muslims and those of Saudi Arabia; Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, on how young people are taught to invest in themselves rather than family or community; and John H. Timmerman, on the person and poetry of Jane Kenyon and on how she lived and worked.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 56

Guests on Volume 56: Miroslav Volf, on Practicing Theology: Beliefs and Practices in Christian Life; J. Judd Owen, on liberal democracy and the taming of religion; David Jacobson, on citizenship and belonging to a place; Belden Lane, on Landscapes of the Sacred: Geography and Narrative in American Spirituality; Alister McGrath, on the doctrine of Creation and the tasks of culture; Don W. King, on the poetry of C. S. Lewis; Edward Norman, on the logic of secularization; and Peter Augustine Lawler, on the proper meaning of postmodernism and “Bobos” and the end of history.

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