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Journals

Our flagship product, the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal, is an “audio magazine” featuring over two hours of conversation with perceptive and engaging thinkers on each quarterly digital volume. Guests on the Journal examine the ideas, institutions, preoccupations, and fashionable assumptions that shape our cultural lives. They include scholars from a wide range of disciplines, most of whom are authors of recent books investigating some aspect of our cultural experience and the interaction of ideas, practices, and institutions that have created the conditions in which we now live.

{ "product": {"id":7016465563711,"title":"Volume 155","handle":"mh-155-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 155\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#kraybill\"\u003eDONALD KRAYBILL\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003eAmish \"negotiate\" with modernity\u003c\/strong\u003e as communities by making decisions about the uses of technology \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#kozinski\"\u003eTHADDEUS KOZINSKI\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the dubious claim within liberalism that public life can be well-ordered by entirely \u003cstrong\u003eneutral (non-transcendent) principles \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hart\"\u003eDAVID BENTLEY HART\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003e\"two-tier Thomism\"\u003c\/strong\u003e deviates from historic Christian understanding of the relationship between God and Creation \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#biggar\"\u003eNIGEL BIGGAR\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on recognizing problems with the notion of \u003cstrong\u003e\"natural rights,\"\u003c\/strong\u003e without denying the importance of rights understood as granted within social and political contexts \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#jain\"\u003eRAVI SCOTT JAIN\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on reconfiguring \u003cstrong\u003escience\u003c\/strong\u003e and the teaching of science within the framework of natural philosophy, natural history, and natural science \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#baxter\"\u003eJASON BAXTER\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003eC. S. Lewis’s imagination\u003c\/strong\u003e was shaped by texts from the Middle Ages\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eClick \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-155-Contents.pdf?v=1663267748\" target=\"_blank\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDonald Kraybill \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003ca name=\"kraybill\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“My basic research question when I started this research with the Amish in the mid-80s to late-80s was, how is it possible for a tradition-laden group like the Amish who reject cars, reject electricity off the public grid, who reject high school, on and on — how is it possible for a group like that to be growing and thriving and flourishing in modern life, in modern society? They were and still are doubling every 20 years . . . And my answer was, well, they have found ways to negotiate with modernity: to accept certain things, to reject other things, and then to make a lot of compromises and then also to adapt — or as one Amish man said “Amishize” — equipment and make it fit into their way of life.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003ca name=\"kraybill\" a=\"\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e— Donald Kraybill, author of \u003c\/em\u003eWhat the Amish Teach Us: Plain Living in a Busy World\u003cem\u003e (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021) \u003c\/em\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cdiv style=\"text-align: right;\" class=\"\"\u003e\n\u003cdiv class=\"\" style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv style=\"text-align: right;\" class=\"\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv style=\"text-align: right;\" class=\"\"\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eSociologist Donald Kraybill explains how the Amish have learned to “negotiate with modernity,” in his book \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eWhat the Amish Teach Us: Plain Living in a Busy World\u003c\/em\u003e. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eKraybill has been writing about the Amish for decades. His curiosity was piqued initially by observing that Amish were flourishing \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e doubling every twenty years \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e despite the fact that they look like they are from the year 1900. His answer is that the Amish have found ways to dynamically reject and accept certain aspects of modernity as a community. Interestingly, the Amish origins do not contain a protest to technology. And, in fact, their origins include such modern ideas as voluntarism and separation of church and state (manifested in their rejection of the state’s demand for infant baptism). Kraybill also marvels at Amish ingenuity and innovation. In many ways, he observes, the Amish have a “culture of restraint” that is “spurring innovation.”\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e     \u003c\/em\u003e \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"kozinski\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eThaddeus Kozinski\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“As the idolatries become more and more insane and explicit, and when one realizes that substitute religions are kind of taking over the culture, one starts to see that, ‘Wait a minute, this isn’t supposed to happen in liberalism,’ and yet it is happening.  And then the question is, ‘Why is it happening?' And the way I look at is, if politics and culture are not based on the real, and the real is known to us through tradition (and through the God-established tradition of Christianity) . . . if in some sense, all our actions (whether individual or communal, social, institutional or personal) are not somehow guided by that tradition in an integrated way, then some other comprehensive tradition — a substitute, a counterfeit — is going to crop up and emerge.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Thaddeus Kozinski, author of \u003c\/em\u003eModernity as Apocalypse: Sacred Nihilism and the Counterfeits of Logos\u003cem\u003e (Angelico Press, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eThaddeus Kozinski argues that liberal order’s ideal of tradition-less neutrality is itself a tradition, in his book \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eModernity as Apocalypse: Sacred Nihilism and the Counterfeits of Logos. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eKozinski, highly influenced by philosopher D. C. Schindler, explains how all the elements of a worldview exist “within a mythos and a logos that’s enculturated and integrated in a theology.” And, when they are not integrated within the real \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e what God has established in Christianity \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e these elements become disparate and “insane.” Ultimately, it’s “Christ or nothing.” And, as Kozinski states (referencing David Bentley Hart) “the nothing ends up portraying itself as a counterfeit architectonic religion.”       \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hart\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDavid Bentley Hart\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“If there is, as I say, a certain porosity between the natural and supernatural, if the human . . . is invested already by its very nature with a divine vocation and a divine dignity and a predisposition to the good that’s intrinsic to our nature, then there are all sorts of realms where the law is \u003c\/em\u003enon compos\u003cem\u003e. But if in fact grace is extrinsic to the nature of the creature —\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ewhich is the axiom that dominates this sect —\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ethen in fact, those who claim a divine warrant for governance can make the law absolute. There’s nothing in human nature itself that demands deference, that intrinsically possesses the dignity of created gods on the way to becoming one with God. Instead, we are just natural beings with an inherently natural end and if we are to be conduced to a higher destiny by an extrinsic grace, then that may take the form of an absolute legal power invested in a sort of throne and altar or a sacerdotal monarchical system and that’s . . . the form the new integralism takes.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— David Bentley Hart, author of  \u003c\/em\u003eYou Are Gods: On Nature and Supernature,\u003cbr\u003e \u003cem\u003e(Notre Dame Press, 2022)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eIn his book \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eYou are Gods: Nature and Supernature, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eDavid Bentley Hart argues that Biblical and Christian history flatly contradict the new integralist return to a two-tiered system of nature versus supernature\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003e. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eHart believes that the impulse toward this metaphysical vision follows after the political vision: a desire to return to a non-existent medieval ideal where absolute power is manifested in “throne and altar or a sacerdotal monarchical system.” While we can all justly criticize modernity, Hart believes the new integralist critique of modern liberalism neglects the reality that the flaws of liberalism proceed out of the flaws of Christendom. Even the common dismissal of modern ideas of freedom as “voluntarist” is inadequate, Hart articulates. Because Enlightenment understandings of freedom proceed out of Renaissance humanism, modern ideas of freedom find their origin in an age that took seriously the god-like endowment of freedom of choice to those created in the image of God.        \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"biggar\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eNigel Biggar\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“As a Christian, I don’t believe in a general right to liberty. I mean, if I’m a Hobbesian, then yes, we’re all at liberty to do whatever it takes to survive; if that means scratch each others’ eyes out, then we’re at liberty to do it. But, as a Christian, I believe we are born with responsibility and therefore we have room for choices, but we are born, not only with the liberty of making choices, we are born also into social obligations, which are, as it were, co-original. So there is no original, undefined liberty. . . . We may have a right to liberties of certain kinds in certain circumstances, but it is the abstraction that is the problem.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Nigel Biggar, author of \u003c\/em\u003eWhat's Wrong with Rights?\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eIn his book, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eWhat’s Wrong with Rights?\u003c\/em\u003e, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003etheologian Nigel Biggar argues that the problem with rights talk today is its abstraction from context and from the process of moral deliberation. While Biggar does take issue with much of contemporary rights talk, he is also critical of many Christian thinkers’ carelessness in dismissing it altogether \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e not distinguishing between natural moral rights and positive legal rights. Some rights talk is legitimate, Biggar explains. Positive legal rights are often vitally important. On the other hand, he argues that there are no natural rights because the social institutions that strengthen and enforce what are normally considered natural rights are not always everywhere existent. Ultimately, Biggar argues that legal rights belong at the end of a process of moral conclusion \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e if they are introduced at the outset, they are too abstract to be helpful.        \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"jain\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eRavi Scott Jain\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The best way to understand theology is the same kind of genetic\/synthetic way that we advocate in the study of physics and biology — seeing the narrative of discovery. And part of it, too, is that the narrative of discovery is not merely discovery, it’s also a narrative of demonstration. Because in the liberal arts, there’s always this alternation between, 'You discovered something. That’s great!' But how do you get other people to believe your discoveries? You have to demonstrate it. And so that, when the students start learning not only to discover things, but also to demonstrate them to others, that’s also powerful and creates powerful habits of thought that cross all the disciplines.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e—  Ravi Scott Jain, co-author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eA New Natural Philosophy: Recovering a Natural Science and Christian Pedagogy \u003cem\u003e(Classical Academic Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eScience teacher Ravi Jain discusses natural philosophy, the “love of wisdom in the realm of nature,” as the overarching discipline in the sciences. In \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eA New Natural Philosophy: Recovering a Natural Science and Christian Pedagogy\u003c\/em\u003e, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eJain and his co-authors, Robbie Andreason and Chris Hall, approach the sciences with a belief that “truth does not exclude mystery, but embraces it.” A posture of wonder as well as respect for mystery form the bedrock to approach science along the “narrative of discovery.” This “genetic\/synthetic” pedagogy means a student comes to a subject by first understanding its context and the grappling that made the question emerge. Then, the process comes to fruition as the student demonstrates what they have discovered. In the end, this movement from discovery to demonstration creates habits and skills that cross all disciplines of learning.       \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"baxter\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJason Baxter\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“If you’ve understood something, you’ve realized it’s beautiful. And when you realize it’s beautiful (this is just good Thomism here), you reach out to grasp it. Your will desires it. You want to sort of bury it in your heart and in your veins, such that it becomes a part of you and it’s not . . . just a set of kilobytes of information in your brain. And I think that Lewis (even before the height of the age of information, what we live in, or what Deborah Lupton calls the ‘datafication of the self’) I think recognized this aspect of literature, but particularly pre-modern medieval literature, as its ability to be haptic, to have this sense of touch and taste and the palpable and then all the consequences of that extraordinary metaphor.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Jason Baxter, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eThe Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis: How Great Books Shaped a Great Mind \u003cem\u003e(InterVarsity Press, 2022)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eScholar Jason Baxter explores the limitations of the modern imagination in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis: How Great Books Shaped a Great Mind\u003c\/em\u003e.\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eC. S. Lewis marveled at the possibilities of literature\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eespecially medieval literature\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto communicate an atmosphere, a “weather of emotions.” Reading this literature enabled Lewis to become a “naturalized citizen of the Middle Ages,” and Baxter believes this aspect of Lewis can guide moderns to see and surpass the narrow boundaries of a “psychic paradigm controlled by scientific methodology.” Literature can influence the “deep structure of our thoughts,” Baxter explains. And this helps us to not turn back the clock but attend to the way that our daily lives have become so integrated to the machine. And, most importantly, we can learn that our deepest responses to beauty and goodness are not mere emotions but real knowledge that points to the eternal.        \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2022-09-15T19:20:06-04:00","created_at":"2022-09-14T12:21:14-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["Amish","C. S. Lewis","David Bentley Hart","Donald Kraybill","Featured product","Human rights","Jason Baxter","Medieval Christianity","Nigel Biggar","Ravi Jain","Rights","Science and Theology","Thaddeus Kozinski"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":39807453298751,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-155-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 155","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-155.jpg?v=1663172475","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Kraybill_WhattheAmishTeachUs.jpg?v=1663192484","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Kozinski_ModernityasApocalypse.jpg?v=1663192484","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hart_YouAreGods-1.jpg?v=1663192564","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/9780198861973.jpg?v=1663192564","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jain_ANewNaturalPhilosophy-2.jpg?v=1663192484","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Baxter_MedievalMind.jpg?v=1663192484"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-155.jpg?v=1663172475","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":22331119960127,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-155.jpg?v=1663172475"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-155.jpg?v=1663172475","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":22332525117503,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.714,"height":500,"width":357,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Kraybill_WhattheAmishTeachUs.jpg?v=1663192484"},"aspect_ratio":0.714,"height":500,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Kraybill_WhattheAmishTeachUs.jpg?v=1663192484","width":357},{"alt":null,"id":22331131363391,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":1360,"width":907,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Kozinski_ModernityasApocalypse.jpg?v=1663192484"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":1360,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Kozinski_ModernityasApocalypse.jpg?v=1663192484","width":907},{"alt":null,"id":22332484386879,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":900,"width":600,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hart_YouAreGods-1.jpg?v=1663192564"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":900,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hart_YouAreGods-1.jpg?v=1663192564","width":600},{"alt":null,"id":22332486778943,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.651,"height":550,"width":358,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/9780198861973.jpg?v=1663192564"},"aspect_ratio":0.651,"height":550,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/9780198861973.jpg?v=1663192564","width":358},{"alt":null,"id":22332481634367,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":883,"width":600,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jain_ANewNaturalPhilosophy-2.jpg?v=1663192484"},"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":883,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jain_ANewNaturalPhilosophy-2.jpg?v=1663192484","width":600},{"alt":null,"id":22332499755071,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.647,"height":1360,"width":880,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Baxter_MedievalMind.jpg?v=1663192484"},"aspect_ratio":0.647,"height":1360,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Baxter_MedievalMind.jpg?v=1663192484","width":880}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 155\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#kraybill\"\u003eDONALD KRAYBILL\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003eAmish \"negotiate\" with modernity\u003c\/strong\u003e as communities by making decisions about the uses of technology \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#kozinski\"\u003eTHADDEUS KOZINSKI\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the dubious claim within liberalism that public life can be well-ordered by entirely \u003cstrong\u003eneutral (non-transcendent) principles \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hart\"\u003eDAVID BENTLEY HART\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003e\"two-tier Thomism\"\u003c\/strong\u003e deviates from historic Christian understanding of the relationship between God and Creation \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#biggar\"\u003eNIGEL BIGGAR\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on recognizing problems with the notion of \u003cstrong\u003e\"natural rights,\"\u003c\/strong\u003e without denying the importance of rights understood as granted within social and political contexts \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#jain\"\u003eRAVI SCOTT JAIN\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on reconfiguring \u003cstrong\u003escience\u003c\/strong\u003e and the teaching of science within the framework of natural philosophy, natural history, and natural science \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#baxter\"\u003eJASON BAXTER\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003eC. S. Lewis’s imagination\u003c\/strong\u003e was shaped by texts from the Middle Ages\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eClick \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-155-Contents.pdf?v=1663267748\" target=\"_blank\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDonald Kraybill \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003ca name=\"kraybill\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“My basic research question when I started this research with the Amish in the mid-80s to late-80s was, how is it possible for a tradition-laden group like the Amish who reject cars, reject electricity off the public grid, who reject high school, on and on — how is it possible for a group like that to be growing and thriving and flourishing in modern life, in modern society? They were and still are doubling every 20 years . . . And my answer was, well, they have found ways to negotiate with modernity: to accept certain things, to reject other things, and then to make a lot of compromises and then also to adapt — or as one Amish man said “Amishize” — equipment and make it fit into their way of life.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003ca name=\"kraybill\" a=\"\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e— Donald Kraybill, author of \u003c\/em\u003eWhat the Amish Teach Us: Plain Living in a Busy World\u003cem\u003e (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021) \u003c\/em\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cdiv style=\"text-align: right;\" class=\"\"\u003e\n\u003cdiv class=\"\" style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv style=\"text-align: right;\" class=\"\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv style=\"text-align: right;\" class=\"\"\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eSociologist Donald Kraybill explains how the Amish have learned to “negotiate with modernity,” in his book \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eWhat the Amish Teach Us: Plain Living in a Busy World\u003c\/em\u003e. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eKraybill has been writing about the Amish for decades. His curiosity was piqued initially by observing that Amish were flourishing \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e doubling every twenty years \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e despite the fact that they look like they are from the year 1900. His answer is that the Amish have found ways to dynamically reject and accept certain aspects of modernity as a community. Interestingly, the Amish origins do not contain a protest to technology. And, in fact, their origins include such modern ideas as voluntarism and separation of church and state (manifested in their rejection of the state’s demand for infant baptism). Kraybill also marvels at Amish ingenuity and innovation. In many ways, he observes, the Amish have a “culture of restraint” that is “spurring innovation.”\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e     \u003c\/em\u003e \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"kozinski\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eThaddeus Kozinski\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“As the idolatries become more and more insane and explicit, and when one realizes that substitute religions are kind of taking over the culture, one starts to see that, ‘Wait a minute, this isn’t supposed to happen in liberalism,’ and yet it is happening.  And then the question is, ‘Why is it happening?' And the way I look at is, if politics and culture are not based on the real, and the real is known to us through tradition (and through the God-established tradition of Christianity) . . . if in some sense, all our actions (whether individual or communal, social, institutional or personal) are not somehow guided by that tradition in an integrated way, then some other comprehensive tradition — a substitute, a counterfeit — is going to crop up and emerge.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Thaddeus Kozinski, author of \u003c\/em\u003eModernity as Apocalypse: Sacred Nihilism and the Counterfeits of Logos\u003cem\u003e (Angelico Press, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eThaddeus Kozinski argues that liberal order’s ideal of tradition-less neutrality is itself a tradition, in his book \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eModernity as Apocalypse: Sacred Nihilism and the Counterfeits of Logos. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eKozinski, highly influenced by philosopher D. C. Schindler, explains how all the elements of a worldview exist “within a mythos and a logos that’s enculturated and integrated in a theology.” And, when they are not integrated within the real \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e what God has established in Christianity \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e these elements become disparate and “insane.” Ultimately, it’s “Christ or nothing.” And, as Kozinski states (referencing David Bentley Hart) “the nothing ends up portraying itself as a counterfeit architectonic religion.”       \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hart\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDavid Bentley Hart\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“If there is, as I say, a certain porosity between the natural and supernatural, if the human . . . is invested already by its very nature with a divine vocation and a divine dignity and a predisposition to the good that’s intrinsic to our nature, then there are all sorts of realms where the law is \u003c\/em\u003enon compos\u003cem\u003e. But if in fact grace is extrinsic to the nature of the creature —\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ewhich is the axiom that dominates this sect —\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ethen in fact, those who claim a divine warrant for governance can make the law absolute. There’s nothing in human nature itself that demands deference, that intrinsically possesses the dignity of created gods on the way to becoming one with God. Instead, we are just natural beings with an inherently natural end and if we are to be conduced to a higher destiny by an extrinsic grace, then that may take the form of an absolute legal power invested in a sort of throne and altar or a sacerdotal monarchical system and that’s . . . the form the new integralism takes.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— David Bentley Hart, author of  \u003c\/em\u003eYou Are Gods: On Nature and Supernature,\u003cbr\u003e \u003cem\u003e(Notre Dame Press, 2022)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eIn his book \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eYou are Gods: Nature and Supernature, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eDavid Bentley Hart argues that Biblical and Christian history flatly contradict the new integralist return to a two-tiered system of nature versus supernature\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003e. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eHart believes that the impulse toward this metaphysical vision follows after the political vision: a desire to return to a non-existent medieval ideal where absolute power is manifested in “throne and altar or a sacerdotal monarchical system.” While we can all justly criticize modernity, Hart believes the new integralist critique of modern liberalism neglects the reality that the flaws of liberalism proceed out of the flaws of Christendom. Even the common dismissal of modern ideas of freedom as “voluntarist” is inadequate, Hart articulates. Because Enlightenment understandings of freedom proceed out of Renaissance humanism, modern ideas of freedom find their origin in an age that took seriously the god-like endowment of freedom of choice to those created in the image of God.        \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"biggar\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eNigel Biggar\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“As a Christian, I don’t believe in a general right to liberty. I mean, if I’m a Hobbesian, then yes, we’re all at liberty to do whatever it takes to survive; if that means scratch each others’ eyes out, then we’re at liberty to do it. But, as a Christian, I believe we are born with responsibility and therefore we have room for choices, but we are born, not only with the liberty of making choices, we are born also into social obligations, which are, as it were, co-original. So there is no original, undefined liberty. . . . We may have a right to liberties of certain kinds in certain circumstances, but it is the abstraction that is the problem.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Nigel Biggar, author of \u003c\/em\u003eWhat's Wrong with Rights?\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eIn his book, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eWhat’s Wrong with Rights?\u003c\/em\u003e, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003etheologian Nigel Biggar argues that the problem with rights talk today is its abstraction from context and from the process of moral deliberation. While Biggar does take issue with much of contemporary rights talk, he is also critical of many Christian thinkers’ carelessness in dismissing it altogether \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e not distinguishing between natural moral rights and positive legal rights. Some rights talk is legitimate, Biggar explains. Positive legal rights are often vitally important. On the other hand, he argues that there are no natural rights because the social institutions that strengthen and enforce what are normally considered natural rights are not always everywhere existent. Ultimately, Biggar argues that legal rights belong at the end of a process of moral conclusion \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e if they are introduced at the outset, they are too abstract to be helpful.        \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"jain\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eRavi Scott Jain\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The best way to understand theology is the same kind of genetic\/synthetic way that we advocate in the study of physics and biology — seeing the narrative of discovery. And part of it, too, is that the narrative of discovery is not merely discovery, it’s also a narrative of demonstration. Because in the liberal arts, there’s always this alternation between, 'You discovered something. That’s great!' But how do you get other people to believe your discoveries? You have to demonstrate it. And so that, when the students start learning not only to discover things, but also to demonstrate them to others, that’s also powerful and creates powerful habits of thought that cross all the disciplines.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e—  Ravi Scott Jain, co-author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eA New Natural Philosophy: Recovering a Natural Science and Christian Pedagogy \u003cem\u003e(Classical Academic Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eScience teacher Ravi Jain discusses natural philosophy, the “love of wisdom in the realm of nature,” as the overarching discipline in the sciences. In \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eA New Natural Philosophy: Recovering a Natural Science and Christian Pedagogy\u003c\/em\u003e, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eJain and his co-authors, Robbie Andreason and Chris Hall, approach the sciences with a belief that “truth does not exclude mystery, but embraces it.” A posture of wonder as well as respect for mystery form the bedrock to approach science along the “narrative of discovery.” This “genetic\/synthetic” pedagogy means a student comes to a subject by first understanding its context and the grappling that made the question emerge. Then, the process comes to fruition as the student demonstrates what they have discovered. In the end, this movement from discovery to demonstration creates habits and skills that cross all disciplines of learning.       \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"baxter\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJason Baxter\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“If you’ve understood something, you’ve realized it’s beautiful. And when you realize it’s beautiful (this is just good Thomism here), you reach out to grasp it. Your will desires it. You want to sort of bury it in your heart and in your veins, such that it becomes a part of you and it’s not . . . just a set of kilobytes of information in your brain. And I think that Lewis (even before the height of the age of information, what we live in, or what Deborah Lupton calls the ‘datafication of the self’) I think recognized this aspect of literature, but particularly pre-modern medieval literature, as its ability to be haptic, to have this sense of touch and taste and the palpable and then all the consequences of that extraordinary metaphor.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Jason Baxter, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eThe Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis: How Great Books Shaped a Great Mind \u003cem\u003e(InterVarsity Press, 2022)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eScholar Jason Baxter explores the limitations of the modern imagination in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis: How Great Books Shaped a Great Mind\u003c\/em\u003e.\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan class=\"\"\u003eC. S. Lewis marveled at the possibilities of literature\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eespecially medieval literature\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto communicate an atmosphere, a “weather of emotions.” Reading this literature enabled Lewis to become a “naturalized citizen of the Middle Ages,” and Baxter believes this aspect of Lewis can guide moderns to see and surpass the narrow boundaries of a “psychic paradigm controlled by scientific methodology.” Literature can influence the “deep structure of our thoughts,” Baxter explains. And this helps us to not turn back the clock but attend to the way that our daily lives have become so integrated to the machine. And, most importantly, we can learn that our deepest responses to beauty and goodness are not mere emotions but real knowledge that points to the eternal.        \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/admin\/products\/7016465563711#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2022-08-31 16:18:09" } }
Volume 155

Guests on Volume 155

DONALD KRAYBILL on how the Amish "negotiate" with modernity as communities by making decisions about the uses of technology
THADDEUS KOZINSKI on the dubious claim within liberalism that public life can be well-ordered by entirely neutral (non-transcendent) principles
DAVID BENTLEY HART on how "two-tier Thomism" deviates from historic Christian understanding of the relationship between God and Creation
NIGEL BIGGAR on recognizing problems with the notion of "natural rights," without denying the importance of rights understood as granted within social and political contexts
RAVI SCOTT JAIN on reconfiguring science and the teaching of science within the framework of natural philosophy, natural history, and natural science
JASON BAXTER on how C. S. Lewis’s imagination was shaped by texts from the Middle Ages

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume. 

Donald Kraybill 

“My basic research question when I started this research with the Amish in the mid-80s to late-80s was, how is it possible for a tradition-laden group like the Amish who reject cars, reject electricity off the public grid, who reject high school, on and on — how is it possible for a group like that to be growing and thriving and flourishing in modern life, in modern society? They were and still are doubling every 20 years . . . And my answer was, well, they have found ways to negotiate with modernity: to accept certain things, to reject other things, and then to make a lot of compromises and then also to adapt — or as one Amish man said “Amishize” — equipment and make it fit into their way of life."

— Donald Kraybill, author of What the Amish Teach Us: Plain Living in a Busy World (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021)

Sociologist Donald Kraybill explains how the Amish have learned to “negotiate with modernity,” in his book What the Amish Teach Us: Plain Living in a Busy World. Kraybill has been writing about the Amish for decades. His curiosity was piqued initially by observing that Amish were flourishing doubling every twenty years  despite the fact that they look like they are from the year 1900. His answer is that the Amish have found ways to dynamically reject and accept certain aspects of modernity as a community. Interestingly, the Amish origins do not contain a protest to technology. And, in fact, their origins include such modern ideas as voluntarism and separation of church and state (manifested in their rejection of the state’s demand for infant baptism). Kraybill also marvels at Amish ingenuity and innovation. In many ways, he observes, the Amish have a “culture of restraint” that is “spurring innovation.”     

•     •     •

Thaddeus Kozinski

“As the idolatries become more and more insane and explicit, and when one realizes that substitute religions are kind of taking over the culture, one starts to see that, ‘Wait a minute, this isn’t supposed to happen in liberalism,’ and yet it is happening.  And then the question is, ‘Why is it happening?' And the way I look at is, if politics and culture are not based on the real, and the real is known to us through tradition (and through the God-established tradition of Christianity) . . . if in some sense, all our actions (whether individual or communal, social, institutional or personal) are not somehow guided by that tradition in an integrated way, then some other comprehensive tradition — a substitute, a counterfeit — is going to crop up and emerge.”

— Thaddeus Kozinski, author of Modernity as Apocalypse: Sacred Nihilism and the Counterfeits of Logos (Angelico Press, 2019)

Thaddeus Kozinski argues that liberal order’s ideal of tradition-less neutrality is itself a tradition, in his book Modernity as Apocalypse: Sacred Nihilism and the Counterfeits of Logos. Kozinski, highly influenced by philosopher D. C. Schindler, explains how all the elements of a worldview exist “within a mythos and a logos that’s enculturated and integrated in a theology.” And, when they are not integrated within the real what God has established in Christianity these elements become disparate and “insane.” Ultimately, it’s “Christ or nothing.” And, as Kozinski states (referencing David Bentley Hart) “the nothing ends up portraying itself as a counterfeit architectonic religion.”      

•     •     •

David Bentley Hart

“If there is, as I say, a certain porosity between the natural and supernatural, if the human . . . is invested already by its very nature with a divine vocation and a divine dignity and a predisposition to the good that’s intrinsic to our nature, then there are all sorts of realms where the law is non compos. But if in fact grace is extrinsic to the nature of the creature — which is the axiom that dominates this sect — then in fact, those who claim a divine warrant for governance can make the law absolute. There’s nothing in human nature itself that demands deference, that intrinsically possesses the dignity of created gods on the way to becoming one with God. Instead, we are just natural beings with an inherently natural end and if we are to be conduced to a higher destiny by an extrinsic grace, then that may take the form of an absolute legal power invested in a sort of throne and altar or a sacerdotal monarchical system and that’s . . . the form the new integralism takes.”

— David Bentley Hart, author of  You Are Gods: On Nature and Supernature,
(Notre Dame Press, 2022)

In his book You are Gods: Nature and Supernature, David Bentley Hart argues that Biblical and Christian history flatly contradict the new integralist return to a two-tiered system of nature versus supernature. Hart believes that the impulse toward this metaphysical vision follows after the political vision: a desire to return to a non-existent medieval ideal where absolute power is manifested in “throne and altar or a sacerdotal monarchical system.” While we can all justly criticize modernity, Hart believes the new integralist critique of modern liberalism neglects the reality that the flaws of liberalism proceed out of the flaws of Christendom. Even the common dismissal of modern ideas of freedom as “voluntarist” is inadequate, Hart articulates. Because Enlightenment understandings of freedom proceed out of Renaissance humanism, modern ideas of freedom find their origin in an age that took seriously the god-like endowment of freedom of choice to those created in the image of God.       

•     •     •

Nigel Biggar

“As a Christian, I don’t believe in a general right to liberty. I mean, if I’m a Hobbesian, then yes, we’re all at liberty to do whatever it takes to survive; if that means scratch each others’ eyes out, then we’re at liberty to do it. But, as a Christian, I believe we are born with responsibility and therefore we have room for choices, but we are born, not only with the liberty of making choices, we are born also into social obligations, which are, as it were, co-original. So there is no original, undefined liberty. . . . We may have a right to liberties of certain kinds in certain circumstances, but it is the abstraction that is the problem.”

— Nigel Biggar, author of What's Wrong with Rights? (Oxford University Press, 2020)

In his book, What’s Wrong with Rights?, theologian Nigel Biggar argues that the problem with rights talk today is its abstraction from context and from the process of moral deliberation. While Biggar does take issue with much of contemporary rights talk, he is also critical of many Christian thinkers’ carelessness in dismissing it altogether not distinguishing between natural moral rights and positive legal rights. Some rights talk is legitimate, Biggar explains. Positive legal rights are often vitally important. On the other hand, he argues that there are no natural rights because the social institutions that strengthen and enforce what are normally considered natural rights are not always everywhere existent. Ultimately, Biggar argues that legal rights belong at the end of a process of moral conclusion  if they are introduced at the outset, they are too abstract to be helpful.       

•     •     •

Ravi Scott Jain

“The best way to understand theology is the same kind of genetic/synthetic way that we advocate in the study of physics and biology — seeing the narrative of discovery. And part of it, too, is that the narrative of discovery is not merely discovery, it’s also a narrative of demonstration. Because in the liberal arts, there’s always this alternation between, 'You discovered something. That’s great!' But how do you get other people to believe your discoveries? You have to demonstrate it. And so that, when the students start learning not only to discover things, but also to demonstrate them to others, that’s also powerful and creates powerful habits of thought that cross all the disciplines.”

—  Ravi Scott Jain, co-author of A New Natural Philosophy: Recovering a Natural Science and Christian Pedagogy (Classical Academic Press, 2021)

Science teacher Ravi Jain discusses natural philosophy, the “love of wisdom in the realm of nature,” as the overarching discipline in the sciences. In A New Natural Philosophy: Recovering a Natural Science and Christian Pedagogy, Jain and his co-authors, Robbie Andreason and Chris Hall, approach the sciences with a belief that “truth does not exclude mystery, but embraces it.” A posture of wonder as well as respect for mystery form the bedrock to approach science along the “narrative of discovery.” This “genetic/synthetic” pedagogy means a student comes to a subject by first understanding its context and the grappling that made the question emerge. Then, the process comes to fruition as the student demonstrates what they have discovered. In the end, this movement from discovery to demonstration creates habits and skills that cross all disciplines of learning.      

•     •     •

Jason Baxter

“If you’ve understood something, you’ve realized it’s beautiful. And when you realize it’s beautiful (this is just good Thomism here), you reach out to grasp it. Your will desires it. You want to sort of bury it in your heart and in your veins, such that it becomes a part of you and it’s not . . . just a set of kilobytes of information in your brain. And I think that Lewis (even before the height of the age of information, what we live in, or what Deborah Lupton calls the ‘datafication of the self’) I think recognized this aspect of literature, but particularly pre-modern medieval literature, as its ability to be haptic, to have this sense of touch and taste and the palpable and then all the consequences of that extraordinary metaphor.”

— Jason Baxter, author of The Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis: How Great Books Shaped a Great Mind (InterVarsity Press, 2022)

Scholar Jason Baxter explores the limitations of the modern imagination in his book The Medieval Mind of C. S. Lewis: How Great Books Shaped a Great Mind.  C. S. Lewis marveled at the possibilities of literature  especially medieval literature  to communicate an atmosphere, a “weather of emotions.” Reading this literature enabled Lewis to become a “naturalized citizen of the Middle Ages,” and Baxter believes this aspect of Lewis can guide moderns to see and surpass the narrow boundaries of a “psychic paradigm controlled by scientific methodology.” Literature can influence the “deep structure of our thoughts,” Baxter explains. And this helps us to not turn back the clock but attend to the way that our daily lives have become so integrated to the machine. And, most importantly, we can learn that our deepest responses to beauty and goodness are not mere emotions but real knowledge that points to the eternal.       


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{ "product": {"id":6953741811775,"title":"Volume 154","handle":"mh-154-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 154\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#song\"\u003eFELICIA WU SONG\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003esocial media\u003c\/strong\u003e promote “networked individualism” and establish market-driven notions of authority \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#ward\"\u003eMICHAEL WARD\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the historical background of and the central ideas in C. S. Lewis’s \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eThe Abolition of Man \u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#wirzba\"\u003eNORMAN WIRZBA\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on why we need to think more deeply about what \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eCreation\u003c\/strong\u003e means and about the consequences of recognizing the presence of Christ — the \u003cem\u003eLogos\u003c\/em\u003e — in all of Creation \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#trueman\"\u003eCARL TRUEMAN \u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eon the long-developing social trends that gave rise to new understandings of \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003ethe self\u003c\/strong\u003e, and to new claims about human \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003esexuality \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#schindler\"\u003eD. C. SCHINDLER\u003c\/a\u003e \u003ca href=\"#schindler\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eon \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e how \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eliberalism\u003c\/strong\u003e — especially in its boundaries between “private” and “public” — allows for less freedom than it pretends \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mccarthy\"\u003eKERRY McCARTHY\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003eon the life and accomplishments of Tudor-era composer \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eThomas Tallis \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eClick \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-154-Contents.pdf?v=1654872470\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" target=\"_blank\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-154-Contents.pdf?v=1654872470\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"song\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eFelicia Wu Song \u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“When you move into the digital \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/span\u003e in the ways that social media has framed us, organized us \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/span\u003e we are all individuals. We aren’t attached to households or places. And so there’re ways in which our perceptions of ourselves and even the interactions that we have really are increasingly individualized because there are no other people that are mediating our interactions with other people. . . . No one’s knocking on my Facebook account door . . . to have to get past my brother to get to me \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/span\u003e it’s just me. And so, what ends up happening is that the actual infrastructure of the social media shapes our imaginations about where we are located in society. It shapes how we imagine ourselves to be at the center of the networks.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Felicia Wu Song, author of \u003c\/em\u003eRestless Devices: Recovering Personhood, Presence, and Place in the Digital Age \u003cem\u003e(InterVarsity Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eFelicia Wu Song argues that social media flattens relationships into \u003cem\u003eproblems\u003c\/em\u003e that need to be \u003cem\u003esolved\u003c\/em\u003e. Relationships have also been changed by the way social media frames all people as isolated individuals. Before the digital age, individuals were always known in the context of households, in the context of community. With social media, Song explains that each person becomes the center of the network. They also become trained into the sensibilities that life is defined by scarcity and optimization. A Christian social imaginary, she argues, must be counter-cultural to these sensibilities and grapple with what it looks like to live in the abundance of God’s grace and rest.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"ward\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMichael Ward\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The objectivity of value does not mean that we all have to sing in unison. There can still be a plurality of voices, but unless we acknowledge the objectivity of value, there’s no grounds for pluralism. There’s no grounds for anything. And, that’s the fundamental thing, you know, at the back of Lewis’s whole argument. It’s not why should we care whether this or that is valued... but it’s why we should care about anything at all.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Michael Ward, author of \u003c\/em\u003eAfter Humanity: A Guide to C. S. Lewis’s \u003cem\u003eThe Abolition of Man (Word on Fire Academic, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eC. S. Lewis scholar Michael Ward explains why \u003cem\u003eThe Abolition of Man\u003c\/em\u003e is one of Lewis’s most important but also most difficult books. While some readers think that \u003cem\u003eThe Abolition of Man\u003c\/em\u003e is an almost modernist attempt by Lewis to establish absolute value, Ward explains that the book is really much more subtle. Lewis does not deny that we are subjects who experience reality through our own lenses. Instead, says Ward, “All Lewis is denying is that those things are themselves absolute and that they eradicate the possibility of objective knowledge.” Ultimately, Ward explains, Lewis warns that if we embrace radical subjectivism, we are headed toward cultural ruin.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"wirzba\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eNorman Wirzba\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“If the starting point for Christians is that the world that we inhabit is not only occasionally, perhaps at certain points, the object of God’s love, but is in fact the material manifestation of God’s love, how can we simply leave that behind and say, ‘Well, the doctrine [of creation] is primarily about origins, and we fight about when that actually happened, but it’s not of enduring perennial practical significance.’ That seemed to me to be a theological catastrophe and it’s no accident then that Christians are really late to the game in thinking about how do we build a world in which species can flourish together.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Norman Wirzba, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThis Sacred Life: Humanity’s Place in a Wounded World\u003cem\u003e (Cambridge University Press, 2021) \u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003eTheologian Norman Wirzba believes that Creation is the “material manifestation of God’s love” and that this fundamental teaching affects everything, especially our understanding of the meaning of modern environmental crises and climate change. In \u003cem\u003eThis Sacred Life,\u003c\/em\u003e Wirzba addresses how the Scriptures never depict a God who is interested in escaping the Creation, and he has never wanted for people to do so either. Instead, as we see in the miracles of Jesus, God desires for all creation to live into the fullness of their way of being — their \u003cem\u003e“tropos,”\u003c\/em\u003e according to Maximus the Confessor. In the end, Wirzba explains, the \u003cem\u003etropos\u003c\/em\u003e of everything in creation is to take care of others — to \u003cem\u003ebe\u003c\/em\u003e for others.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003ca name=\"wirzba\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"trueman\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eCarl Trueman\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“If we were to look at the problem of modernity as a basic anthropological mistake,  epitomized by Jean Jacques Rousseau's claim that “Man is born free and everywhere is in chains,” (self-evidently nonsense: nobody’s born free; we’re all born remarkably dependent upon others obviously our parents, but not restricted simply to them); if you think about modernity as being predicated on that fundamental anthropological mistake, then many of the ways that conservative Christians think are predicated on precisely that mistake as well: the emphasis on rights, the emphasis on autonomy, the emphasis on the unencumbered self.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Carl Trueman, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self: Cultural Amnesia, Expressive Individualism, and the Road to Sexual Revolution\u003cem\u003e (Crossway Books, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eHistorian Carl Trueman argues that conservative Christians are complicit in the same dynamics that they condemn in modern culture. Sexual immorality is the manifestation of deeper issues, Trueman explains, resulting out of the basic anthropological mistake of modernity: assuming that man is “born free, but is everywhere in chains” (Jean-Jacques Rousseau). Trueman explores the way that the concept of self has changed historically, from being \u003cem\u003eoutwardly\u003c\/em\u003e directed to being \u003cem\u003einwardly\u003c\/em\u003e directed. The atmosphere of expressive individualism that is pervasive today, he argues, leads to a kind of cultural amnesia.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003ca name=\"wirzba\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003ca name=\"trueman\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"schindler\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eD. C. Schindler\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“There is a profound difference between a coincidence of self-interest and an actual real common good — a real thing in its objective reality that gathers us around itself. And when you lose a sense of things being able to gather us in a common good — and things beyond mere material concerns, so things like truth, dignity, culture, beauty, things that have a transcendent significance and ultimately God and the worship of God — when those things are no longer permitted to be affirmed, you lose any positive principle for genuine public life.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— D. C. Schindler, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Politics of the Real: The Church Between Liberalism and Integralism\u003cem\u003e (New Polity Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003ePhilosopher D. C. Schindler argues that — because of the nature of the incarnation — when one rejects reality, one is rejecting God. Rejecting the real — failing to recognizing and honor what is really the case — also means the loss of any true “public” gathered around a common good. In the pre-modern world, “the public” was understood as the life of the community, but with modernity, the individual shifts from being a member of a community to being the center of gravity in and of himself. This means that the public sphere became merely the place for the gathering of individuals. Liberalism sought to make way for these individuals to function together without any orientation to an explicit common good. But, as Schindler argues, without a common good, public life collapses in upon itself.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003ca name=\"wirzba\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003ca name=\"trueman\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mccarthy\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eKerry McCarthy\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The one thing I’m struck with most with Tallis in particular is his resilience. So many professional musicians in his situation quit music and did something else. They became teachers; they became clergy; they became theologians. A lot of them just died fairly young. But Tallis kept going and it’s almost a miraculous lifespan if you think about that.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Kerry McCarthy, author of \u003c\/em\u003eTallis\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eMusic historian Kerry McCarthy relates the shifting historical circumstances that surrounded the life of English Renaissance composer Thomas Tallis. While the documentary evidence we have is very slim (only about 35 to 40 documents), McCarthy shares that what emerges clearly is a picture of Tallis’s resilience over the span of his half-century long career. Riding the tumultuous tides of political and musical changes in those years, Tallis constantly had to reinvent his musical style. And, McCarthy conveys, these layers of tumult, stylistic changes, and foreign emphases led to the music which still captivates and surprises us today.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2022-06-10T18:02:22-04:00","created_at":"2022-06-10T17:57:18-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["C. S. Lewis","Carl Trueman","Creation","D. C. Schindler","Environmentalism","Felicia Wu Song","Individualism","Kerry McCarthy","Liberalism","Maximus the Confessor","Michael Ward","Norman Wirzba","Social media","Technology","Thomas Tallis"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":39696455794751,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-154-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 154","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-154_63eb1dcf-4fba-4b29-80af-840e01b3e523.jpg?v=1654898240","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Song_RestlessDevices_b52cf244-d1c7-4a05-934f-7ec4f677e0c3.jpg?v=1654898261","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Ward_AfterHumanity_22574338-391d-4050-b84f-185b1fe0a75f.jpg?v=1654898261","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Wirzba_ThisSacredLife_f48f115c-5f48-47c4-bc93-4287dbb3fa68.jpg?v=1654898261","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Trueman_TheRiseandFalloftheModernSelf_359ccdb9-511a-468f-abe9-848a80c92f1c.jpg?v=1654898259","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Schindler_ThePoliticsoftheReal_f3dd4d6f-22c0-4805-8084-9ed1cdb11791.jpg?v=1654898239","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/McCarthy_Tallis_67b80f3e-37fa-4429-a5dc-e1e0741dd3c4.jpg?v=1654898282"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-154_63eb1dcf-4fba-4b29-80af-840e01b3e523.jpg?v=1654898240","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":21980005040191,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-154_63eb1dcf-4fba-4b29-80af-840e01b3e523.jpg?v=1654898240"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-154_63eb1dcf-4fba-4b29-80af-840e01b3e523.jpg?v=1654898240","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":21980005204031,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"width":333,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Song_RestlessDevices_b52cf244-d1c7-4a05-934f-7ec4f677e0c3.jpg?v=1654898261"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Song_RestlessDevices_b52cf244-d1c7-4a05-934f-7ec4f677e0c3.jpg?v=1654898261","width":333},{"alt":null,"id":21980005138495,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.677,"height":499,"width":338,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Ward_AfterHumanity_22574338-391d-4050-b84f-185b1fe0a75f.jpg?v=1654898261"},"aspect_ratio":0.677,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Ward_AfterHumanity_22574338-391d-4050-b84f-185b1fe0a75f.jpg?v=1654898261","width":338},{"alt":null,"id":21980005105727,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"width":333,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Wirzba_ThisSacredLife_f48f115c-5f48-47c4-bc93-4287dbb3fa68.jpg?v=1654898261"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Wirzba_ThisSacredLife_f48f115c-5f48-47c4-bc93-4287dbb3fa68.jpg?v=1654898261","width":333},{"alt":null,"id":21980005171263,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.666,"height":500,"width":333,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Trueman_TheRiseandFalloftheModernSelf_359ccdb9-511a-468f-abe9-848a80c92f1c.jpg?v=1654898259"},"aspect_ratio":0.666,"height":500,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Trueman_TheRiseandFalloftheModernSelf_359ccdb9-511a-468f-abe9-848a80c92f1c.jpg?v=1654898259","width":333},{"alt":null,"id":21980005236799,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.663,"height":499,"width":331,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Schindler_ThePoliticsoftheReal_f3dd4d6f-22c0-4805-8084-9ed1cdb11791.jpg?v=1654898239"},"aspect_ratio":0.663,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Schindler_ThePoliticsoftheReal_f3dd4d6f-22c0-4805-8084-9ed1cdb11791.jpg?v=1654898239","width":331},{"alt":null,"id":21980007989311,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.659,"height":499,"width":329,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/McCarthy_Tallis_67b80f3e-37fa-4429-a5dc-e1e0741dd3c4.jpg?v=1654898282"},"aspect_ratio":0.659,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/McCarthy_Tallis_67b80f3e-37fa-4429-a5dc-e1e0741dd3c4.jpg?v=1654898282","width":329}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 154\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#song\"\u003eFELICIA WU SONG\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003esocial media\u003c\/strong\u003e promote “networked individualism” and establish market-driven notions of authority \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#ward\"\u003eMICHAEL WARD\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the historical background of and the central ideas in C. S. Lewis’s \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eThe Abolition of Man \u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#wirzba\"\u003eNORMAN WIRZBA\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on why we need to think more deeply about what \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eCreation\u003c\/strong\u003e means and about the consequences of recognizing the presence of Christ — the \u003cem\u003eLogos\u003c\/em\u003e — in all of Creation \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#trueman\"\u003eCARL TRUEMAN \u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eon the long-developing social trends that gave rise to new understandings of \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003ethe self\u003c\/strong\u003e, and to new claims about human \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003esexuality \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#schindler\"\u003eD. C. SCHINDLER\u003c\/a\u003e \u003ca href=\"#schindler\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eon \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e how \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eliberalism\u003c\/strong\u003e — especially in its boundaries between “private” and “public” — allows for less freedom than it pretends \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mccarthy\"\u003eKERRY McCARTHY\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003eon the life and accomplishments of Tudor-era composer \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eThomas Tallis \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eClick \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-154-Contents.pdf?v=1654872470\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" target=\"_blank\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-154-Contents.pdf?v=1654872470\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"song\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eFelicia Wu Song \u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“When you move into the digital \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/span\u003e in the ways that social media has framed us, organized us \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/span\u003e we are all individuals. We aren’t attached to households or places. And so there’re ways in which our perceptions of ourselves and even the interactions that we have really are increasingly individualized because there are no other people that are mediating our interactions with other people. . . . No one’s knocking on my Facebook account door . . . to have to get past my brother to get to me \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e—\u003c\/span\u003e it’s just me. And so, what ends up happening is that the actual infrastructure of the social media shapes our imaginations about where we are located in society. It shapes how we imagine ourselves to be at the center of the networks.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Felicia Wu Song, author of \u003c\/em\u003eRestless Devices: Recovering Personhood, Presence, and Place in the Digital Age \u003cem\u003e(InterVarsity Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eFelicia Wu Song argues that social media flattens relationships into \u003cem\u003eproblems\u003c\/em\u003e that need to be \u003cem\u003esolved\u003c\/em\u003e. Relationships have also been changed by the way social media frames all people as isolated individuals. Before the digital age, individuals were always known in the context of households, in the context of community. With social media, Song explains that each person becomes the center of the network. They also become trained into the sensibilities that life is defined by scarcity and optimization. A Christian social imaginary, she argues, must be counter-cultural to these sensibilities and grapple with what it looks like to live in the abundance of God’s grace and rest.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"ward\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMichael Ward\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The objectivity of value does not mean that we all have to sing in unison. There can still be a plurality of voices, but unless we acknowledge the objectivity of value, there’s no grounds for pluralism. There’s no grounds for anything. And, that’s the fundamental thing, you know, at the back of Lewis’s whole argument. It’s not why should we care whether this or that is valued... but it’s why we should care about anything at all.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Michael Ward, author of \u003c\/em\u003eAfter Humanity: A Guide to C. S. Lewis’s \u003cem\u003eThe Abolition of Man (Word on Fire Academic, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eC. S. Lewis scholar Michael Ward explains why \u003cem\u003eThe Abolition of Man\u003c\/em\u003e is one of Lewis’s most important but also most difficult books. While some readers think that \u003cem\u003eThe Abolition of Man\u003c\/em\u003e is an almost modernist attempt by Lewis to establish absolute value, Ward explains that the book is really much more subtle. Lewis does not deny that we are subjects who experience reality through our own lenses. Instead, says Ward, “All Lewis is denying is that those things are themselves absolute and that they eradicate the possibility of objective knowledge.” Ultimately, Ward explains, Lewis warns that if we embrace radical subjectivism, we are headed toward cultural ruin.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"wirzba\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eNorman Wirzba\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“If the starting point for Christians is that the world that we inhabit is not only occasionally, perhaps at certain points, the object of God’s love, but is in fact the material manifestation of God’s love, how can we simply leave that behind and say, ‘Well, the doctrine [of creation] is primarily about origins, and we fight about when that actually happened, but it’s not of enduring perennial practical significance.’ That seemed to me to be a theological catastrophe and it’s no accident then that Christians are really late to the game in thinking about how do we build a world in which species can flourish together.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Norman Wirzba, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThis Sacred Life: Humanity’s Place in a Wounded World\u003cem\u003e (Cambridge University Press, 2021) \u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003eTheologian Norman Wirzba believes that Creation is the “material manifestation of God’s love” and that this fundamental teaching affects everything, especially our understanding of the meaning of modern environmental crises and climate change. In \u003cem\u003eThis Sacred Life,\u003c\/em\u003e Wirzba addresses how the Scriptures never depict a God who is interested in escaping the Creation, and he has never wanted for people to do so either. Instead, as we see in the miracles of Jesus, God desires for all creation to live into the fullness of their way of being — their \u003cem\u003e“tropos,”\u003c\/em\u003e according to Maximus the Confessor. In the end, Wirzba explains, the \u003cem\u003etropos\u003c\/em\u003e of everything in creation is to take care of others — to \u003cem\u003ebe\u003c\/em\u003e for others.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003ca name=\"wirzba\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"trueman\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eCarl Trueman\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“If we were to look at the problem of modernity as a basic anthropological mistake,  epitomized by Jean Jacques Rousseau's claim that “Man is born free and everywhere is in chains,” (self-evidently nonsense: nobody’s born free; we’re all born remarkably dependent upon others obviously our parents, but not restricted simply to them); if you think about modernity as being predicated on that fundamental anthropological mistake, then many of the ways that conservative Christians think are predicated on precisely that mistake as well: the emphasis on rights, the emphasis on autonomy, the emphasis on the unencumbered self.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Carl Trueman, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self: Cultural Amnesia, Expressive Individualism, and the Road to Sexual Revolution\u003cem\u003e (Crossway Books, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eHistorian Carl Trueman argues that conservative Christians are complicit in the same dynamics that they condemn in modern culture. Sexual immorality is the manifestation of deeper issues, Trueman explains, resulting out of the basic anthropological mistake of modernity: assuming that man is “born free, but is everywhere in chains” (Jean-Jacques Rousseau). Trueman explores the way that the concept of self has changed historically, from being \u003cem\u003eoutwardly\u003c\/em\u003e directed to being \u003cem\u003einwardly\u003c\/em\u003e directed. The atmosphere of expressive individualism that is pervasive today, he argues, leads to a kind of cultural amnesia.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003ca name=\"wirzba\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003ca name=\"trueman\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"schindler\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eD. C. Schindler\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“There is a profound difference between a coincidence of self-interest and an actual real common good — a real thing in its objective reality that gathers us around itself. And when you lose a sense of things being able to gather us in a common good — and things beyond mere material concerns, so things like truth, dignity, culture, beauty, things that have a transcendent significance and ultimately God and the worship of God — when those things are no longer permitted to be affirmed, you lose any positive principle for genuine public life.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— D. C. Schindler, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Politics of the Real: The Church Between Liberalism and Integralism\u003cem\u003e (New Polity Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003ePhilosopher D. C. Schindler argues that — because of the nature of the incarnation — when one rejects reality, one is rejecting God. Rejecting the real — failing to recognizing and honor what is really the case — also means the loss of any true “public” gathered around a common good. In the pre-modern world, “the public” was understood as the life of the community, but with modernity, the individual shifts from being a member of a community to being the center of gravity in and of himself. This means that the public sphere became merely the place for the gathering of individuals. Liberalism sought to make way for these individuals to function together without any orientation to an explicit common good. But, as Schindler argues, without a common good, public life collapses in upon itself.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003ca name=\"wirzba\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003ca name=\"trueman\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mccarthy\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eKerry McCarthy\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The one thing I’m struck with most with Tallis in particular is his resilience. So many professional musicians in his situation quit music and did something else. They became teachers; they became clergy; they became theologians. A lot of them just died fairly young. But Tallis kept going and it’s almost a miraculous lifespan if you think about that.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Kerry McCarthy, author of \u003c\/em\u003eTallis\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eMusic historian Kerry McCarthy relates the shifting historical circumstances that surrounded the life of English Renaissance composer Thomas Tallis. While the documentary evidence we have is very slim (only about 35 to 40 documents), McCarthy shares that what emerges clearly is a picture of Tallis’s resilience over the span of his half-century long career. Riding the tumultuous tides of political and musical changes in those years, Tallis constantly had to reinvent his musical style. And, McCarthy conveys, these layers of tumult, stylistic changes, and foreign emphases led to the music which still captivates and surprises us today.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2022-05-31 19:17:47" } }
Volume 154

Guests on Volume 154

FELICIA WU SONG on how social media promote “networked individualism” and establish market-driven notions of authority 
MICHAEL WARD on the historical background of and the central ideas in C. S. Lewis’s The Abolition of Man 
NORMAN WIRZBA on why we need to think more deeply about what Creation means and about the consequences of recognizing the presence of Christ — the Logos — in all of Creation 
CARL TRUEMAN on the long-developing social trends that gave rise to new understandings of the self, and to new claims about human sexuality 
D. C. SCHINDLER on how liberalism — especially in its boundaries between “private” and “public” — allows for less freedom than it pretends 
KERRY McCARTHY on the life and accomplishments of Tudor-era composer Thomas Tallis 

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume. 

Felicia Wu Song 

“When you move into the digital  in the ways that social media has framed us, organized us  we are all individuals. We aren’t attached to households or places. And so there’re ways in which our perceptions of ourselves and even the interactions that we have really are increasingly individualized because there are no other people that are mediating our interactions with other people. . . . No one’s knocking on my Facebook account door . . . to have to get past my brother to get to me it’s just me. And so, what ends up happening is that the actual infrastructure of the social media shapes our imaginations about where we are located in society. It shapes how we imagine ourselves to be at the center of the networks.”

— Felicia Wu Song, author of Restless Devices: Recovering Personhood, Presence, and Place in the Digital Age (InterVarsity Press, 2021)

Felicia Wu Song argues that social media flattens relationships into problems that need to be solved. Relationships have also been changed by the way social media frames all people as isolated individuals. Before the digital age, individuals were always known in the context of households, in the context of community. With social media, Song explains that each person becomes the center of the network. They also become trained into the sensibilities that life is defined by scarcity and optimization. A Christian social imaginary, she argues, must be counter-cultural to these sensibilities and grapple with what it looks like to live in the abundance of God’s grace and rest.       

•     •     •

Michael Ward

“The objectivity of value does not mean that we all have to sing in unison. There can still be a plurality of voices, but unless we acknowledge the objectivity of value, there’s no grounds for pluralism. There’s no grounds for anything. And, that’s the fundamental thing, you know, at the back of Lewis’s whole argument. It’s not why should we care whether this or that is valued... but it’s why we should care about anything at all.”

— Michael Ward, author of After Humanity: A Guide to C. S. Lewis’s The Abolition of Man (Word on Fire Academic, 2021)

C. S. Lewis scholar Michael Ward explains why The Abolition of Man is one of Lewis’s most important but also most difficult books. While some readers think that The Abolition of Man is an almost modernist attempt by Lewis to establish absolute value, Ward explains that the book is really much more subtle. Lewis does not deny that we are subjects who experience reality through our own lenses. Instead, says Ward, “All Lewis is denying is that those things are themselves absolute and that they eradicate the possibility of objective knowledge.” Ultimately, Ward explains, Lewis warns that if we embrace radical subjectivism, we are headed toward cultural ruin.       

•     •     •

Norman Wirzba

“If the starting point for Christians is that the world that we inhabit is not only occasionally, perhaps at certain points, the object of God’s love, but is in fact the material manifestation of God’s love, how can we simply leave that behind and say, ‘Well, the doctrine [of creation] is primarily about origins, and we fight about when that actually happened, but it’s not of enduring perennial practical significance.’ That seemed to me to be a theological catastrophe and it’s no accident then that Christians are really late to the game in thinking about how do we build a world in which species can flourish together.”

— Norman Wirzba, author of This Sacred Life: Humanity’s Place in a Wounded World (Cambridge University Press, 2021)

Theologian Norman Wirzba believes that Creation is the “material manifestation of God’s love” and that this fundamental teaching affects everything, especially our understanding of the meaning of modern environmental crises and climate change. In This Sacred Life, Wirzba addresses how the Scriptures never depict a God who is interested in escaping the Creation, and he has never wanted for people to do so either. Instead, as we see in the miracles of Jesus, God desires for all creation to live into the fullness of their way of being — their “tropos,” according to Maximus the Confessor. In the end, Wirzba explains, the tropos of everything in creation is to take care of others — to be for others.       

•     •     •

Carl Trueman

“If we were to look at the problem of modernity as a basic anthropological mistake,  epitomized by Jean Jacques Rousseau's claim that “Man is born free and everywhere is in chains,” (self-evidently nonsense: nobody’s born free; we’re all born remarkably dependent upon others obviously our parents, but not restricted simply to them); if you think about modernity as being predicated on that fundamental anthropological mistake, then many of the ways that conservative Christians think are predicated on precisely that mistake as well: the emphasis on rights, the emphasis on autonomy, the emphasis on the unencumbered self.”

— Carl Trueman, author of The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self: Cultural Amnesia, Expressive Individualism, and the Road to Sexual Revolution (Crossway Books, 2020)

Historian Carl Trueman argues that conservative Christians are complicit in the same dynamics that they condemn in modern culture. Sexual immorality is the manifestation of deeper issues, Trueman explains, resulting out of the basic anthropological mistake of modernity: assuming that man is “born free, but is everywhere in chains” (Jean-Jacques Rousseau). Trueman explores the way that the concept of self has changed historically, from being outwardly directed to being inwardly directed. The atmosphere of expressive individualism that is pervasive today, he argues, leads to a kind of cultural amnesia.       

•     •     •

D. C. Schindler

“There is a profound difference between a coincidence of self-interest and an actual real common good — a real thing in its objective reality that gathers us around itself. And when you lose a sense of things being able to gather us in a common good — and things beyond mere material concerns, so things like truth, dignity, culture, beauty, things that have a transcendent significance and ultimately God and the worship of God — when those things are no longer permitted to be affirmed, you lose any positive principle for genuine public life.”

— D. C. Schindler, author of The Politics of the Real: The Church Between Liberalism and Integralism (New Polity Press, 2021)

Philosopher D. C. Schindler argues that — because of the nature of the incarnation — when one rejects reality, one is rejecting God. Rejecting the real — failing to recognizing and honor what is really the case — also means the loss of any true “public” gathered around a common good. In the pre-modern world, “the public” was understood as the life of the community, but with modernity, the individual shifts from being a member of a community to being the center of gravity in and of himself. This means that the public sphere became merely the place for the gathering of individuals. Liberalism sought to make way for these individuals to function together without any orientation to an explicit common good. But, as Schindler argues, without a common good, public life collapses in upon itself.       

•     •     •

Kerry McCarthy

“The one thing I’m struck with most with Tallis in particular is his resilience. So many professional musicians in his situation quit music and did something else. They became teachers; they became clergy; they became theologians. A lot of them just died fairly young. But Tallis kept going and it’s almost a miraculous lifespan if you think about that.”

— Kerry McCarthy, author of Tallis (Oxford University Press, 2020)

Music historian Kerry McCarthy relates the shifting historical circumstances that surrounded the life of English Renaissance composer Thomas Tallis. While the documentary evidence we have is very slim (only about 35 to 40 documents), McCarthy shares that what emerges clearly is a picture of Tallis’s resilience over the span of his half-century long career. Riding the tumultuous tides of political and musical changes in those years, Tallis constantly had to reinvent his musical style. And, McCarthy conveys, these layers of tumult, stylistic changes, and foreign emphases led to the music which still captivates and surprises us today.       

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{ "product": {"id":6894373437503,"title":"Volume 153","handle":"mh-153-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 153\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#camosy\"\u003eCHARLES C. CAMOSY\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how the exclusion of theological affirmations in \u003cstrong\u003ebioethics\u003c\/strong\u003e threatens human dignity \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#snead\"\u003eO. CARTER SNEAD\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how laws and public regulations conceal an implicit \u003cstrong\u003etheological anthropology \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#feeney\"\u003eMATT FEENEY\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on how anticipation of the “college admissions process” increases the temptation toward \u003cstrong\u003ecompetitive parenting \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mooney\"\u003eMARGARITA A. MOONEY\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how the liberal arts promote a \u003cstrong\u003elove of learning \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#markos\"\u003eLOUIS MARKOS\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on why Christians shouldn’t ignore the gifts to the Church given by \u003cstrong\u003ePlato’s philosophical insights\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#jacobs\"\u003eALAN JACOBS \u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eon escaping the tempestuous climate of modern media by \u003cstrong\u003ereading books\u003c\/strong\u003e by dead people \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-153-Contents.pdf?v=1647275400\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"camosy\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e \u003cem\u003eCharles C. Camosy\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Some secular folks . . . claim to have a vision according to natural kinds where we would include the newborn, disabled infant along with the college professor as being along the same lines, despite the obvious difference . . . but I’m not very convinced that those arguments actually work. Frankly, I think we see the more and more people move, you know, from a theological lens to a philosophical one, the more that that particular set of arguments fails to convince, and instead we move more towards autonomy, rationality, self-awareness, productivity as the things that we value. And then we find quite readily that not all human beings have those in equal measure — some appear not to have them at all — and we end up with radical inequality.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Charles C. Camosy, author of \u003c\/em\u003eLosing Our Dignity: How Secularized Medicine is Undermining Fundamental Human Equality\u003cem\u003e (New City Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eProfessor Charles Camosy argues that modern medicine lacks an adequate explanation for why all people should be treated with equal worth in his book \u003cem\u003eLosing Our Dignity: How Secularized Medicine is Undermining Fundamental Human Equality\u003c\/em\u003e. Instead, when the highest values are autonomy, rationality, and productivity, he states, “We end up with radical inequality.” Nonetheless, Camosy argues that the best ethical intuitions and judgments in modern medicine are grounded in a theological account of human nature. For example, historically, the \u003cem\u003ede facto\u003c\/em\u003e posture of “not aiming at death” emerged from medieval battlefield discussions between priests and doctors. Christians ought to be confident in our theological rationale, Camosy believes, because it has vital implications for thorny medical issues today.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"snead\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eO. Carter Snead\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“The methodological claim is that the richest way to understand matters of public bioethics – this area of law and public policy–  is to ask the question of  ‘What vision of human identity and human flourishing anchors and undergirds and animates the laws and policies under consideration?’ And the reason I think this is a valuable point of entry into that kind of analysis is because all law purports to (and is intended to and is best understood as) providing for the flourishing of persons or protecting of persons. And so, if that’s true – and I think it is – the law has to assume (or have a set of assumptions) about what a person is and what human flourishing is.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— O. Carter Snead, author of \u003c\/em\u003eWhat It Means to Be Human: The Case for the Body in Public Bioethics\u003cem\u003e (Harvard University Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003ePolitical scientist O. Carter Snead argues that all matters of public bioethics are determined by beliefs about human identity and flourishing. In his book, \u003cem\u003eWhat It Means to Be Human: The Case for the Body in Public Bioethics\u003c\/em\u003e, Snead analyzes abortion, end-of-life decision-making, and assisted reproduction, finding that the public bioethics concerning these matters is undergirded by the values of expressive individualism. Within this modern vision, human identity is found through a process of self-discovery, obviously prioritizing autonomy and detachment. And Snead makes the point that this vision is just a snapshot of humans at their most fortunate. Even at their very best, humans experience radical dependence at the beginning and end of life, which means that all humans have unchosen obligations and duties of care. Snead argues that this reality must be seriously reckoned with in public bioethics.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"feeney\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMatt Feeney\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“There’s an irony about this stuff because the kids are kind of trained in the appearance of . . . niceness and concern, but, you know, from the standpoint of citizenship, it’s also perhaps a training in pliability and agreeability and conformity. This is my argument: that the process . . . of forming yourself in order to satisfy a committee is a process of making yourself . . . pliable. You have to kind of bend yourself in order to look the right way and then, to turn yourself into the kind of person that a committee likes.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Matt Feeney, author of \u003c\/em\u003eLittle Platoons: A Defense of Family in a Competitive Age\u003cem\u003e (Basic Books, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eIn his book \u003cem\u003eLittle Platoons: A Defense of Family in a Competitive Age\u003c\/em\u003e, political philosopher Matt Feeney argues that family life has become “colonized” for the sake of competitive child rearing. A father of three, Feeney started to explore this idea when his oldest daughter was in middle school, and he saw the pressure on students to take extracurriculars simply for the sake of their college application. Feeney does not take a scornful or shaming stance. Rather, his book flows from reflection on how children have been forced to compete in order to stand out to college admissions committees. These admissions committees now play an outsized role in the lives of students, and he wonders why college faculties do not do more to protest the diminishment of the formative role of the teacher as the center of collegiate life.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mooney\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMargarita A. Mooney\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“A liberal arts approach to education is broader than simply the content of the curriculum. It’s broader than simply including the great works of philosophy, literature, and theology. It’s an approach to the human person . . . that builds social order from the ground up. The liberal arts vision of education presupposes that by forming persons holistically, they will know how to enter into common life and how to build social bonds. So, the liberal arts education is not a social project in the sense that it doesn’t set out to create a particular set of political or social institutions. It aims to equip the next generation with an understanding of the traditions that preceded them \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e— w\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eith a starting point for which to venture out into their common life, their shared life together.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Margarita A. Mooney, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Love of Learning: Seven Dialogues on the Liberal Arts\u003cem\u003e (Cluny Media, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eProfessor Margarita A. Mooney argues that a liberal arts approach starts with a holistic and personal understanding of the individual and “builds social order from the ground up.” In her book, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ci data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eThe Love of Learning: Seven Dialogues on the Liberal Arts\u003c\/i\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, Mooney invites the reader into conversations with seven individuals invested in educational philosophy. As a professor, her own interest in the subject began in listening to her students' needs and realizing how vital it was for them to grasp the \u003cem\u003etelos\u003c\/em\u003e of their educational model. She wants students to grapple with whether the end of knowledge in their educational model is primarily about power or about knowledge in and of itself (and its ability to shape the soul). Ultimately, she argues that a liberal arts education is the model that does the most justice to the shape of the human soul and the needs of the greater social order.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"markos\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eLouis Markos\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“We need to move beyond the shifting shadows to contemplate that which is truly true, and really real. It was Plato who taught us to seek after the beatific vision of the Good, the True, and the Beautiful. Now, thankfully, we have special revelation to tell us that yes, we can contemplate, but what we’re contemplating is not impersonal forms, as they are in Plato, but the very personal, trans-personal, triune God. But still, Plato is explaining to us the need not to be deceived by shadows, and to grow and move forward into the light of reality.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e \u003cem\u003e— Louis Markos, author of \u003c\/em\u003eFrom Plato to Christ: How Platonic Thought Shaped the Christian Faith\u003cem\u003e (InterVarsity Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eProfessor Louis Markos is weary of Plato being blamed for everything bad in the western Christian world. In his book, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ci data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eFrom Plato to Christ: How Platonic Thought Shaped the Christian Faith\u003c\/i\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, Markos claims instead that Plato needs to be recognized for his unique and serendipitous role in preparing the world for Christ. While certainly recognizing that the fullness of revelation is not to be found in Platonic philosophy, Markos still believes Christians need to reclaim the goodness that the great philosopher was able to reveal. He also wants Christians to stop reading later Gnosticism into Plato himself. Though Plato could not have had the revelation that humans are “enfleshed souls,” he did not believe that the body is inherently evil. Essentially, Markos argues that Plato can be “lifted up” into the fullness revealed in Christ.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"jacobs\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAlan Jacobs\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“It occurred to me that one of the really great things about ‘breaking bread with the dead’ \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e— \u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003ethat is, with the writers and the thinkers and all the people from the past \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e— \u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eis that that’s not as scary as sitting down at table with a political enemy, knowing that the conversation could escalate into something very tense or even angry. When you’re breaking bread with the dead, you don’t have to worry about that. . . . If this dead person says something to you that offends or hurts you, you can set the book down. Maybe you can come back to it later or maybe you don’t come back to it later, but you’re in charge of the situation. And it occurred to me that maybe if we can learn to break bread with the dead, it might give us a bit of training that would help us to break bread with the living.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Alan Jacobs, author of \u003c\/em\u003eBreaking Bread with the Dead: A Reader's Guide to a More Tranquil Mind\u003cem\u003e (Penguin Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eEnglish professor Alan Jacobs encourages readers to pick up old books, not primarily for the sake of greatness, but for the sake of difference. In his book \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ci data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eBreaking Bread with the Dead: A Reader’s Guide to a More Tranquil Mind\u003c\/i\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, Jacobs considers how reading old books may be an education in patience and therefore applicable to difficult relationships, especially in our current political and cultural climate. Taking his title from a W. H. Auden quotation, Jacobs reflects on the similarities between reading old books and table fellowship. But he claims that the advantage to reading old books is that readers are in control of the conversation. They can put down the book, pausing (or even ending) the exchange. Nonetheless, if readers patiently engage, especially giving attention to the differences that make them uncomfortable, they may become more adept in dealing with differences between people and even achieve a “tranquil mind.”        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2022-03-14T10:04:59-04:00","created_at":"2022-03-09T12:18:43-05:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["Alan Jacobs","Bioethics","Charles C. Camosy","Colleges and Universities","Learning","Liberal Arts","Literature","Louis Markos","Margarita A. Mooney","Matt Feeney","O. Carter Snead","Parenting","Plato","Reading"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":39620705878079,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-153-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 153","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-153.jpg?v=1646846712","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Camosy_LosingOurDignity.jpg?v=1646849125","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Snead_WhatItMeanstoBeHuman.jpg?v=1646850699","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Feeney_LittlePlatoons.jpg?v=1646850699","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Mooney_TheLoveofLearning.jpg?v=1646850699","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Markos_FromPlatotoChrist.jpg?v=1646850699","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jacobs_BreakingBreadwiththeDead.jpg?v=1646850699"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-153.jpg?v=1646846712","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":21679728984127,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-153.jpg?v=1646846712"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-153.jpg?v=1646846712","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":21679854747711,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.64,"height":500,"width":320,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Camosy_LosingOurDignity.jpg?v=1646849125"},"aspect_ratio":0.64,"height":500,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Camosy_LosingOurDignity.jpg?v=1646849125","width":320},{"alt":null,"id":21679943319615,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.659,"height":680,"width":448,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Snead_WhatItMeanstoBeHuman.jpg?v=1646850699"},"aspect_ratio":0.659,"height":680,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Snead_WhatItMeanstoBeHuman.jpg?v=1646850699","width":448},{"alt":null,"id":21679903473727,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.662,"height":500,"width":331,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Feeney_LittlePlatoons.jpg?v=1646850699"},"aspect_ratio":0.662,"height":500,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Feeney_LittlePlatoons.jpg?v=1646850699","width":331},{"alt":null,"id":21679904587839,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.649,"height":499,"width":324,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Mooney_TheLoveofLearning.jpg?v=1646850699"},"aspect_ratio":0.649,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Mooney_TheLoveofLearning.jpg?v=1646850699","width":324},{"alt":null,"id":21679915171903,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":550,"width":367,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Markos_FromPlatotoChrist.jpg?v=1646850699"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":550,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Markos_FromPlatotoChrist.jpg?v=1646850699","width":367},{"alt":null,"id":21679919136831,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.624,"height":450,"width":281,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jacobs_BreakingBreadwiththeDead.jpg?v=1646850699"},"aspect_ratio":0.624,"height":450,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jacobs_BreakingBreadwiththeDead.jpg?v=1646850699","width":281}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 153\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#camosy\"\u003eCHARLES C. CAMOSY\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how the exclusion of theological affirmations in \u003cstrong\u003ebioethics\u003c\/strong\u003e threatens human dignity \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#snead\"\u003eO. CARTER SNEAD\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how laws and public regulations conceal an implicit \u003cstrong\u003etheological anthropology \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#feeney\"\u003eMATT FEENEY\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on how anticipation of the “college admissions process” increases the temptation toward \u003cstrong\u003ecompetitive parenting \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mooney\"\u003eMARGARITA A. MOONEY\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how the liberal arts promote a \u003cstrong\u003elove of learning \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#markos\"\u003eLOUIS MARKOS\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on why Christians shouldn’t ignore the gifts to the Church given by \u003cstrong\u003ePlato’s philosophical insights\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#jacobs\"\u003eALAN JACOBS \u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eon escaping the tempestuous climate of modern media by \u003cstrong\u003ereading books\u003c\/strong\u003e by dead people \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-153-Contents.pdf?v=1647275400\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"camosy\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e \u003cem\u003eCharles C. Camosy\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Some secular folks . . . claim to have a vision according to natural kinds where we would include the newborn, disabled infant along with the college professor as being along the same lines, despite the obvious difference . . . but I’m not very convinced that those arguments actually work. Frankly, I think we see the more and more people move, you know, from a theological lens to a philosophical one, the more that that particular set of arguments fails to convince, and instead we move more towards autonomy, rationality, self-awareness, productivity as the things that we value. And then we find quite readily that not all human beings have those in equal measure — some appear not to have them at all — and we end up with radical inequality.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Charles C. Camosy, author of \u003c\/em\u003eLosing Our Dignity: How Secularized Medicine is Undermining Fundamental Human Equality\u003cem\u003e (New City Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eProfessor Charles Camosy argues that modern medicine lacks an adequate explanation for why all people should be treated with equal worth in his book \u003cem\u003eLosing Our Dignity: How Secularized Medicine is Undermining Fundamental Human Equality\u003c\/em\u003e. Instead, when the highest values are autonomy, rationality, and productivity, he states, “We end up with radical inequality.” Nonetheless, Camosy argues that the best ethical intuitions and judgments in modern medicine are grounded in a theological account of human nature. For example, historically, the \u003cem\u003ede facto\u003c\/em\u003e posture of “not aiming at death” emerged from medieval battlefield discussions between priests and doctors. Christians ought to be confident in our theological rationale, Camosy believes, because it has vital implications for thorny medical issues today.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"snead\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eO. Carter Snead\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“The methodological claim is that the richest way to understand matters of public bioethics – this area of law and public policy–  is to ask the question of  ‘What vision of human identity and human flourishing anchors and undergirds and animates the laws and policies under consideration?’ And the reason I think this is a valuable point of entry into that kind of analysis is because all law purports to (and is intended to and is best understood as) providing for the flourishing of persons or protecting of persons. And so, if that’s true – and I think it is – the law has to assume (or have a set of assumptions) about what a person is and what human flourishing is.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— O. Carter Snead, author of \u003c\/em\u003eWhat It Means to Be Human: The Case for the Body in Public Bioethics\u003cem\u003e (Harvard University Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003ePolitical scientist O. Carter Snead argues that all matters of public bioethics are determined by beliefs about human identity and flourishing. In his book, \u003cem\u003eWhat It Means to Be Human: The Case for the Body in Public Bioethics\u003c\/em\u003e, Snead analyzes abortion, end-of-life decision-making, and assisted reproduction, finding that the public bioethics concerning these matters is undergirded by the values of expressive individualism. Within this modern vision, human identity is found through a process of self-discovery, obviously prioritizing autonomy and detachment. And Snead makes the point that this vision is just a snapshot of humans at their most fortunate. Even at their very best, humans experience radical dependence at the beginning and end of life, which means that all humans have unchosen obligations and duties of care. Snead argues that this reality must be seriously reckoned with in public bioethics.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"feeney\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMatt Feeney\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“There’s an irony about this stuff because the kids are kind of trained in the appearance of . . . niceness and concern, but, you know, from the standpoint of citizenship, it’s also perhaps a training in pliability and agreeability and conformity. This is my argument: that the process . . . of forming yourself in order to satisfy a committee is a process of making yourself . . . pliable. You have to kind of bend yourself in order to look the right way and then, to turn yourself into the kind of person that a committee likes.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Matt Feeney, author of \u003c\/em\u003eLittle Platoons: A Defense of Family in a Competitive Age\u003cem\u003e (Basic Books, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eIn his book \u003cem\u003eLittle Platoons: A Defense of Family in a Competitive Age\u003c\/em\u003e, political philosopher Matt Feeney argues that family life has become “colonized” for the sake of competitive child rearing. A father of three, Feeney started to explore this idea when his oldest daughter was in middle school, and he saw the pressure on students to take extracurriculars simply for the sake of their college application. Feeney does not take a scornful or shaming stance. Rather, his book flows from reflection on how children have been forced to compete in order to stand out to college admissions committees. These admissions committees now play an outsized role in the lives of students, and he wonders why college faculties do not do more to protest the diminishment of the formative role of the teacher as the center of collegiate life.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mooney\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMargarita A. Mooney\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“A liberal arts approach to education is broader than simply the content of the curriculum. It’s broader than simply including the great works of philosophy, literature, and theology. It’s an approach to the human person . . . that builds social order from the ground up. The liberal arts vision of education presupposes that by forming persons holistically, they will know how to enter into common life and how to build social bonds. So, the liberal arts education is not a social project in the sense that it doesn’t set out to create a particular set of political or social institutions. It aims to equip the next generation with an understanding of the traditions that preceded them \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e— w\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eith a starting point for which to venture out into their common life, their shared life together.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Margarita A. Mooney, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Love of Learning: Seven Dialogues on the Liberal Arts\u003cem\u003e (Cluny Media, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eProfessor Margarita A. Mooney argues that a liberal arts approach starts with a holistic and personal understanding of the individual and “builds social order from the ground up.” In her book, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ci data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eThe Love of Learning: Seven Dialogues on the Liberal Arts\u003c\/i\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, Mooney invites the reader into conversations with seven individuals invested in educational philosophy. As a professor, her own interest in the subject began in listening to her students' needs and realizing how vital it was for them to grasp the \u003cem\u003etelos\u003c\/em\u003e of their educational model. She wants students to grapple with whether the end of knowledge in their educational model is primarily about power or about knowledge in and of itself (and its ability to shape the soul). Ultimately, she argues that a liberal arts education is the model that does the most justice to the shape of the human soul and the needs of the greater social order.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"markos\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eLouis Markos\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“We need to move beyond the shifting shadows to contemplate that which is truly true, and really real. It was Plato who taught us to seek after the beatific vision of the Good, the True, and the Beautiful. Now, thankfully, we have special revelation to tell us that yes, we can contemplate, but what we’re contemplating is not impersonal forms, as they are in Plato, but the very personal, trans-personal, triune God. But still, Plato is explaining to us the need not to be deceived by shadows, and to grow and move forward into the light of reality.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e \u003cem\u003e— Louis Markos, author of \u003c\/em\u003eFrom Plato to Christ: How Platonic Thought Shaped the Christian Faith\u003cem\u003e (InterVarsity Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eProfessor Louis Markos is weary of Plato being blamed for everything bad in the western Christian world. In his book, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ci data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eFrom Plato to Christ: How Platonic Thought Shaped the Christian Faith\u003c\/i\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, Markos claims instead that Plato needs to be recognized for his unique and serendipitous role in preparing the world for Christ. While certainly recognizing that the fullness of revelation is not to be found in Platonic philosophy, Markos still believes Christians need to reclaim the goodness that the great philosopher was able to reveal. He also wants Christians to stop reading later Gnosticism into Plato himself. Though Plato could not have had the revelation that humans are “enfleshed souls,” he did not believe that the body is inherently evil. Essentially, Markos argues that Plato can be “lifted up” into the fullness revealed in Christ.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"jacobs\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAlan Jacobs\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“It occurred to me that one of the really great things about ‘breaking bread with the dead’ \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e— \u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003ethat is, with the writers and the thinkers and all the people from the past \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e— \u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eis that that’s not as scary as sitting down at table with a political enemy, knowing that the conversation could escalate into something very tense or even angry. When you’re breaking bread with the dead, you don’t have to worry about that. . . . If this dead person says something to you that offends or hurts you, you can set the book down. Maybe you can come back to it later or maybe you don’t come back to it later, but you’re in charge of the situation. And it occurred to me that maybe if we can learn to break bread with the dead, it might give us a bit of training that would help us to break bread with the living.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Alan Jacobs, author of \u003c\/em\u003eBreaking Bread with the Dead: A Reader's Guide to a More Tranquil Mind\u003cem\u003e (Penguin Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eEnglish professor Alan Jacobs encourages readers to pick up old books, not primarily for the sake of greatness, but for the sake of difference. In his book \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ci data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eBreaking Bread with the Dead: A Reader’s Guide to a More Tranquil Mind\u003c\/i\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, Jacobs considers how reading old books may be an education in patience and therefore applicable to difficult relationships, especially in our current political and cultural climate. Taking his title from a W. H. Auden quotation, Jacobs reflects on the similarities between reading old books and table fellowship. But he claims that the advantage to reading old books is that readers are in control of the conversation. They can put down the book, pausing (or even ending) the exchange. Nonetheless, if readers patiently engage, especially giving attention to the differences that make them uncomfortable, they may become more adept in dealing with differences between people and even achieve a “tranquil mind.”        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2022-02-28 10:54:25" } }
Volume 153

Guests on Volume 153

CHARLES C. CAMOSY on how the exclusion of theological affirmations in bioethics threatens human dignity
O. CARTER SNEAD on how laws and public regulations conceal an implicit theological anthropology
MATT FEENEY on how anticipation of the “college admissions process” increases the temptation toward competitive parenting
MARGARITA A. MOONEY on how the liberal arts promote a love of learning
LOUIS MARKOS on why Christians shouldn’t ignore the gifts to the Church given by Plato’s philosophical insights
ALAN JACOBS on escaping the tempestuous climate of modern media by reading books by dead people

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume. 

Charles C. Camosy 

“Some secular folks . . . claim to have a vision according to natural kinds where we would include the newborn, disabled infant along with the college professor as being along the same lines, despite the obvious difference . . . but I’m not very convinced that those arguments actually work. Frankly, I think we see the more and more people move, you know, from a theological lens to a philosophical one, the more that that particular set of arguments fails to convince, and instead we move more towards autonomy, rationality, self-awareness, productivity as the things that we value. And then we find quite readily that not all human beings have those in equal measure — some appear not to have them at all — and we end up with radical inequality.”

— Charles C. Camosy, author of Losing Our Dignity: How Secularized Medicine is Undermining Fundamental Human Equality (New City Press, 2021)

Professor Charles Camosy argues that modern medicine lacks an adequate explanation for why all people should be treated with equal worth in his book Losing Our Dignity: How Secularized Medicine is Undermining Fundamental Human Equality. Instead, when the highest values are autonomy, rationality, and productivity, he states, “We end up with radical inequality.” Nonetheless, Camosy argues that the best ethical intuitions and judgments in modern medicine are grounded in a theological account of human nature. For example, historically, the de facto posture of “not aiming at death” emerged from medieval battlefield discussions between priests and doctors. Christians ought to be confident in our theological rationale, Camosy believes, because it has vital implications for thorny medical issues today.       

•     •     •

O. Carter Snead

“The methodological claim is that the richest way to understand matters of public bioethics – this area of law and public policy–  is to ask the question of  ‘What vision of human identity and human flourishing anchors and undergirds and animates the laws and policies under consideration?’ And the reason I think this is a valuable point of entry into that kind of analysis is because all law purports to (and is intended to and is best understood as) providing for the flourishing of persons or protecting of persons. And so, if that’s true – and I think it is – the law has to assume (or have a set of assumptions) about what a person is and what human flourishing is.”

— O. Carter Snead, author of What It Means to Be Human: The Case for the Body in Public Bioethics (Harvard University Press, 2021)

Political scientist O. Carter Snead argues that all matters of public bioethics are determined by beliefs about human identity and flourishing. In his book, What It Means to Be Human: The Case for the Body in Public Bioethics, Snead analyzes abortion, end-of-life decision-making, and assisted reproduction, finding that the public bioethics concerning these matters is undergirded by the values of expressive individualism. Within this modern vision, human identity is found through a process of self-discovery, obviously prioritizing autonomy and detachment. And Snead makes the point that this vision is just a snapshot of humans at their most fortunate. Even at their very best, humans experience radical dependence at the beginning and end of life, which means that all humans have unchosen obligations and duties of care. Snead argues that this reality must be seriously reckoned with in public bioethics.       

•     •     •

Matt Feeney

“There’s an irony about this stuff because the kids are kind of trained in the appearance of . . . niceness and concern, but, you know, from the standpoint of citizenship, it’s also perhaps a training in pliability and agreeability and conformity. This is my argument: that the process . . . of forming yourself in order to satisfy a committee is a process of making yourself . . . pliable. You have to kind of bend yourself in order to look the right way and then, to turn yourself into the kind of person that a committee likes.”

— Matt Feeney, author of Little Platoons: A Defense of Family in a Competitive Age (Basic Books, 2021)

In his book Little Platoons: A Defense of Family in a Competitive Age, political philosopher Matt Feeney argues that family life has become “colonized” for the sake of competitive child rearing. A father of three, Feeney started to explore this idea when his oldest daughter was in middle school, and he saw the pressure on students to take extracurriculars simply for the sake of their college application. Feeney does not take a scornful or shaming stance. Rather, his book flows from reflection on how children have been forced to compete in order to stand out to college admissions committees. These admissions committees now play an outsized role in the lives of students, and he wonders why college faculties do not do more to protest the diminishment of the formative role of the teacher as the center of collegiate life.       

•     •     •

Margarita A. Mooney

“A liberal arts approach to education is broader than simply the content of the curriculum. It’s broader than simply including the great works of philosophy, literature, and theology. It’s an approach to the human person . . . that builds social order from the ground up. The liberal arts vision of education presupposes that by forming persons holistically, they will know how to enter into common life and how to build social bonds. So, the liberal arts education is not a social project in the sense that it doesn’t set out to create a particular set of political or social institutions. It aims to equip the next generation with an understanding of the traditions that preceded them — with a starting point for which to venture out into their common life, their shared life together.”

— Margarita A. Mooney, author of The Love of Learning: Seven Dialogues on the Liberal Arts (Cluny Media, 2021)

Professor Margarita A. Mooney argues that a liberal arts approach starts with a holistic and personal understanding of the individual and “builds social order from the ground up.” In her book, The Love of Learning: Seven Dialogues on the Liberal Arts, Mooney invites the reader into conversations with seven individuals invested in educational philosophy. As a professor, her own interest in the subject began in listening to her students' needs and realizing how vital it was for them to grasp the telos of their educational model. She wants students to grapple with whether the end of knowledge in their educational model is primarily about power or about knowledge in and of itself (and its ability to shape the soul). Ultimately, she argues that a liberal arts education is the model that does the most justice to the shape of the human soul and the needs of the greater social order.       

•     •     •

Louis Markos

“We need to move beyond the shifting shadows to contemplate that which is truly true, and really real. It was Plato who taught us to seek after the beatific vision of the Good, the True, and the Beautiful. Now, thankfully, we have special revelation to tell us that yes, we can contemplate, but what we’re contemplating is not impersonal forms, as they are in Plato, but the very personal, trans-personal, triune God. But still, Plato is explaining to us the need not to be deceived by shadows, and to grow and move forward into the light of reality.”

 — Louis Markos, author of From Plato to Christ: How Platonic Thought Shaped the Christian Faith (InterVarsity Press, 2021)

Professor Louis Markos is weary of Plato being blamed for everything bad in the western Christian world. In his book, From Plato to Christ: How Platonic Thought Shaped the Christian Faith, Markos claims instead that Plato needs to be recognized for his unique and serendipitous role in preparing the world for Christ. While certainly recognizing that the fullness of revelation is not to be found in Platonic philosophy, Markos still believes Christians need to reclaim the goodness that the great philosopher was able to reveal. He also wants Christians to stop reading later Gnosticism into Plato himself. Though Plato could not have had the revelation that humans are “enfleshed souls,” he did not believe that the body is inherently evil. Essentially, Markos argues that Plato can be “lifted up” into the fullness revealed in Christ.       

•     •     •

Alan Jacobs

“It occurred to me that one of the really great things about ‘breaking bread with the dead’ — that is, with the writers and the thinkers and all the people from the past — is that that’s not as scary as sitting down at table with a political enemy, knowing that the conversation could escalate into something very tense or even angry. When you’re breaking bread with the dead, you don’t have to worry about that. . . . If this dead person says something to you that offends or hurts you, you can set the book down. Maybe you can come back to it later or maybe you don’t come back to it later, but you’re in charge of the situation. And it occurred to me that maybe if we can learn to break bread with the dead, it might give us a bit of training that would help us to break bread with the living.”

— Alan Jacobs, author of Breaking Bread with the Dead: A Reader's Guide to a More Tranquil Mind (Penguin Press, 2020)

English professor Alan Jacobs encourages readers to pick up old books, not primarily for the sake of greatness, but for the sake of difference. In his book Breaking Bread with the Dead: A Reader’s Guide to a More Tranquil Mind, Jacobs considers how reading old books may be an education in patience and therefore applicable to difficult relationships, especially in our current political and cultural climate. Taking his title from a W. H. Auden quotation, Jacobs reflects on the similarities between reading old books and table fellowship. But he claims that the advantage to reading old books is that readers are in control of the conversation. They can put down the book, pausing (or even ending) the exchange. Nonetheless, if readers patiently engage, especially giving attention to the differences that make them uncomfortable, they may become more adept in dealing with differences between people and even achieve a “tranquil mind.”         

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{ "product": {"id":6815748128831,"title":"Volume 152","handle":"mh-152-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 152\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#lasch-quinn\"\u003eELISABETH LASCH-QUINN\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eon the revival of interest in \u003cstrong\u003epre-Christian philosophical schools\u003c\/strong\u003e (in response to postmodern nihilism) \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#bilbro\"\u003eJEFFREY BILBRO\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eon resisting the disorienting and disintegrating effects of \u003cstrong\u003emodern media \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hitz\"\u003eZENA HITZ\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003eon the love of learning and the freedom animated by the \u003cstrong\u003eintellectual life \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#nolan\"\u003eJAMES L. NOLAN, JR.\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the lessons we should have learned from the experience of the \u003cstrong\u003eManhattan Project \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#barron\"\u003eBISHOP ROBERT BARRON\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eon \u003cstrong\u003eGod, freedom, faith, reason\u003c\/strong\u003e, and the need to keep theology linked with sanctity \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#blakely\"\u003eJASON BLAKELY\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003esocial sciences are \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003einterpretive\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e disciplines\u003c\/strong\u003e, more like the humanities than the “hard” sciences\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-152-Contents.pdf?v=1641585387\" target=\"_blank\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"lasch-quinn\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eElisabeth Lasch-Quinn\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I do really think that part of what we see in these ancient schools of thought — and then, possibly in their resurgence — is that side of human beings: the intellectual and philosophical. And then, that’s not even speaking quite yet of the spiritual. But, I do think that in everyday life, we can see all around us philosophies of different kinds. You know, sometimes fragmented, but sometimes . . .\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003espeaking quite loudly, through pretty much everything that we do or say or think or even feel. . . . There is something about reality — the human reality, the reality of the human person — that can resist the incursions of various different other ways of thinking.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, author of \u003c\/em\u003eArs Vitae: The Fate of Inwardness and the Return of the Ancient Arts of Living\u003cem\u003e (University of Notre Dame Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eHistorian Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn discusses philosophy as the art of living in her book \u003cem\u003eArs Vitae: The Fate of Inwardness and the Return of the Ancient Arts of Living\u003c\/em\u003e. Birthed out of her deep personal interest in antiquity and her alarm at the “shrinkage” of modern life and thought, Lasch-Quinn’s book explores five ancient philosophical schools experiencing a contemporary resurgence. Describing modern society as a therapeutic culture wedded with consumerism, she argues that we live in a “fourth sophistic” era, because of the “acrobatic” way words and philosophies are utilized in relation to actual truth. Lasch-Quinn argues that a return to philosophy as the art of living (not an esoteric territory claimed only by academics) offers an alternative way of life.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"bilbro\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eJeffrey Bilbro\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Curiosity, in the news context, you might think of the rubbernecking tendency: the tendency to be drawn toward the spectacular or the outrageous or the crazy. . . . It can also be a way of wanting to know stuff in order to better manipulate or control reality to get what we want. It doesn’t have to take superficial forms. You can be quite serious and still be curious. It’s about the posture toward new knowledge and the . . . ends to which you want to put this new knowledge to: Is it to better understand and love and care for creation, other people, your neighbor? Or is it to satisfy your own appetites?”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jeffrey Bilbro, author of \u003c\/em\u003eReading the Times: A Literary and Theological Inquiry into the News\u003cem\u003e (InterVarsity Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003eEnglish professor Jeffrey Bilbro explores a Christian posture toward contemporary digital media in his book \u003cem\u003eReading the Times: A Literary and Theological Inquiry into the News\u003c\/em\u003e. Bilbro orients his inquiry around three questions: “To what should we attend? How should we imagine and experience time? And how should we belong to one another?” Bilbro is not a declinist – he recognizes that people have always struggled against distraction. Nonetheless, he is concerned with how social media amplifies that tendency. He wants Christians to evaluate their understanding of time, to realize that their experience of “chronos” time (modern quantified duration) inhabits “kairos” time (time that is seasonal and patterned). This type of realignment toward the eternal can help cultivate the sort of “holy indifference” which Pascal encouraged: a stance which enables Christians to care deeply, but also rest in the providence of God.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hitz\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e \u003cem\u003eZena Hitz\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I want to distinguish between ‘knowledge as power’ in the contemporary sense — where it means .\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e. . the power to do something, the power to get things, the power to acquire, I think, in the end,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ea kind of mastery. And, rather,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eit’s the power that’s connected with one’s dignity as a human being with the growth of one’s capacities, with the development of one’s freedom, that’s a different kind of power and it’s something that you have in yourself for its own sake, and that you can maintain in situations of really extreme powerlessness.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Zena Hitz, author of \u003c\/em\u003eLost in Thought: The Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life\u003cem\u003e (Princeton University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003eZena Hitz explores the dignity and freedom possible through the pursuit of learning with her book \u003cem\u003eLost in Thought: The Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life\u003c\/em\u003e. An intellectual life is not necessarily tied to the university, according to Hitz. On the contrary, educational institutions are often captured by private interests and captive to the marketplace; they are not places where real learning can necessarily flourish. For Hitz, real learning is always hidden learning. It is not about competing for power and domination. It is also not an acquisition, a private possession. Real learning means studiousness, rather than the “love of spectacle.” And it entails a “seriousness about living and learning” which is ultimately undertaken in communion with others.     \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"nolan\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJames L. Nolan, Jr.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“It was a very exciting time in nuclear physics — the exchange of ideas and the kind of discoveries that were unfolding at a rapid pace and, you know, ‘Can we do this?’ and I think that was clearly part of it. And again, the consequences, in terms of the military application of it, I don’t think was the primary or the leading motivation for the scientists. So much so that once they saw the Trinity Test and witnessed the enormity of the explosion, many of them all of a sudden had worries. Oppenheimer famously cited the\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eBhagavad Gita,\u003cem\u003e ‘I have become Death, the destroyer of worlds.’ And there’s all of a sudden a sense of ‘What have we done? What have we created?’”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— James L. Nolan, Jr., author of \u003c\/em\u003eAtomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age\u003cem\u003e (The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003eIn the book \u003cem\u003eAtomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age\u003c\/em\u003e, sociologist James L. Nolan, Jr., tells the story of his grandfather’s medical involvement in the Manhattan Project — the World War II research and development which produced the first atomic weapons. Nolan had known the basics of his grandfather’s history in the nuclear age. However, it was only after discovering a box filled with family memorabilia that Nolan discovered the extent of his grandfather’s involvement, spanning from working on the Trinity Project to being one of the first doctors in Japan after the war. While the book is primarily a historical account, Nolan also sees this time period as a case study in the dangers of technological enthusiasm outpacing wisdom and caution, and he believes that we need to take these lessons seriously in our own day.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"barron\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eBishop Robert Barron\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Precisely because God is not a being among beings, he is not one being sort of competing for territory in the same ontological space as creatures, then God’s presence is a non-competitive one. God can come close to his creatures without compromising their integrity. And, of course, the great moment when we see this is the incarnation. The two natures coming together —‘without mixing, mingling, or confusion,’ as Chalcedon puts it. So, the integrity of Jesus’ s humanity is preserved, it’s enhanced, it’s made perfect and beautiful precisely by the closeness of God.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Bishop Robert Barron, author of \u003c\/em\u003eRenewing Our Hope: Essays for the New Evangelization\u003cem\u003e (The Catholic University of America Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003eOne of the central threads of Bishop Robert Barron's work through the years has been the non-competitive transcendence of God — that “God can come close to his creatures without compromising their integrity.” In his latest book, \u003cem\u003eRenewing Our Hope: Essays for the New Evangelization\u003c\/em\u003e, Bishop Barron continues exploring this theme and (among other topics) how it conflicts with the modern conception of freedom. Rather than a \"zero-sum game,\" where the existence of God means the loss of human freedom and dignity, Barron argues that God’s non-competitive transcendence means the possibility of true freedom and dignity. Bishop Barron also believes the application of this theme addresses the tragic rift between theology and spirituality — in the same way that God's existence does not denigrate human dignity, right doctrine does not denigrate the human experience. The encounter with Christ is the purpose of theology and doctrine, and Barron does his best to exemplify this in his life and work.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"blakely\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJason Blakely\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I think that actually the dominant philosophical school in the social sciences thinks of itself as on the path to articulating something akin to the natural sciences, this sort of descriptive theory that is often articulated in almost an abstraction away from the socio-political lifeworld. I mean, if you told a social scientist, ‘Are you interpreting?’ they might very well say, ‘Yes, I’m interpreting,’ but then if you looked at their actual methods and concepts, they would not show interpretive sensitivity.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jason Blakely, author of \u003c\/em\u003eWe Built Reality: How Social Sciences Infiltrated Culture, Politics, and Power\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003ePolitical scientist Jason Blakely argues in his book \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eWe Built Reality: How Social Sciences Infiltrated Culture, Politics, and Power \u003c\/em\u003ethat the social sciences have too often been treated as though they were the same as the natural sciences. In contrast to the natural sciences, where theories do not affect what is being studied, social theory massively affects and changes studies within the social sciences. When this is not recognized, the social sciences can be misused as pseudo-scientific means to justify changes in culture and politics.  As a “hermeneuticist” committed to the art of interpretation, Blakely believes that the solution to this is to treat the social sciences in a way that is more akin to the humanities, recognizing the need for interpretive sensitivity. And he calls for social scientists to become comfortable with story as a way to capture the contingent causality that is always at play in the human sciences.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2021-11-29T20:33:57-05:00","created_at":"2021-11-24T08:10:33-05:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["Alasdair MacIntyre","Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn","God's transcendence","James L. Nolan","Jason Blakely","Jeffrey Bilbro","Journalism","Learning","Manhattan Project","Philosopy","Robert Barron","Social Sciences","Zena Hitz"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":39526180814911,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-152-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 152","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-152.jpg?v=1638043454","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Lasch-Quinn_ArsVitae.jpg?v=1638043454","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Nolan_AtomicDoctors.jpg?v=1638043454","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bilbro_ReadingtheTimes.jpg?v=1638043454","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hitz_LostinThought.jpg?v=1638043454","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Barron_RenewingOurHope.png?v=1638043454","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Blakely_WeBuiltReality.jpg?v=1638043454"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-152.jpg?v=1638043454","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":21349275500607,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-152.jpg?v=1638043454"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-152.jpg?v=1638043454","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":21337478791231,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":900,"width":600,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Lasch-Quinn_ArsVitae.jpg?v=1638043454"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":900,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Lasch-Quinn_ArsVitae.jpg?v=1638043454","width":600},{"alt":null,"id":21337479381055,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.662,"height":1000,"width":662,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Nolan_AtomicDoctors.jpg?v=1638043454"},"aspect_ratio":0.662,"height":1000,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Nolan_AtomicDoctors.jpg?v=1638043454","width":662},{"alt":null,"id":21337480659007,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.653,"height":1024,"width":669,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bilbro_ReadingtheTimes.jpg?v=1638043454"},"aspect_ratio":0.653,"height":1024,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bilbro_ReadingtheTimes.jpg?v=1638043454","width":669},{"alt":null,"id":21337481773119,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.647,"height":634,"width":410,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hitz_LostinThought.jpg?v=1638043454"},"aspect_ratio":0.647,"height":634,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hitz_LostinThought.jpg?v=1638043454","width":410},{"alt":null,"id":21337487245375,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.673,"height":480,"width":323,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Barron_RenewingOurHope.png?v=1638043454"},"aspect_ratio":0.673,"height":480,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Barron_RenewingOurHope.png?v=1638043454","width":323},{"alt":null,"id":21337487573055,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"width":333,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Blakely_WeBuiltReality.jpg?v=1638043454"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Blakely_WeBuiltReality.jpg?v=1638043454","width":333}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 152\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#lasch-quinn\"\u003eELISABETH LASCH-QUINN\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eon the revival of interest in \u003cstrong\u003epre-Christian philosophical schools\u003c\/strong\u003e (in response to postmodern nihilism) \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#bilbro\"\u003eJEFFREY BILBRO\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eon resisting the disorienting and disintegrating effects of \u003cstrong\u003emodern media \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hitz\"\u003eZENA HITZ\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003eon the love of learning and the freedom animated by the \u003cstrong\u003eintellectual life \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#nolan\"\u003eJAMES L. NOLAN, JR.\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the lessons we should have learned from the experience of the \u003cstrong\u003eManhattan Project \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#barron\"\u003eBISHOP ROBERT BARRON\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eon \u003cstrong\u003eGod, freedom, faith, reason\u003c\/strong\u003e, and the need to keep theology linked with sanctity \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#blakely\"\u003eJASON BLAKELY\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003esocial sciences are \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003einterpretive\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e disciplines\u003c\/strong\u003e, more like the humanities than the “hard” sciences\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-152-Contents.pdf?v=1641585387\" target=\"_blank\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"lasch-quinn\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eElisabeth Lasch-Quinn\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I do really think that part of what we see in these ancient schools of thought — and then, possibly in their resurgence — is that side of human beings: the intellectual and philosophical. And then, that’s not even speaking quite yet of the spiritual. But, I do think that in everyday life, we can see all around us philosophies of different kinds. You know, sometimes fragmented, but sometimes . . .\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003espeaking quite loudly, through pretty much everything that we do or say or think or even feel. . . . There is something about reality — the human reality, the reality of the human person — that can resist the incursions of various different other ways of thinking.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, author of \u003c\/em\u003eArs Vitae: The Fate of Inwardness and the Return of the Ancient Arts of Living\u003cem\u003e (University of Notre Dame Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eHistorian Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn discusses philosophy as the art of living in her book \u003cem\u003eArs Vitae: The Fate of Inwardness and the Return of the Ancient Arts of Living\u003c\/em\u003e. Birthed out of her deep personal interest in antiquity and her alarm at the “shrinkage” of modern life and thought, Lasch-Quinn’s book explores five ancient philosophical schools experiencing a contemporary resurgence. Describing modern society as a therapeutic culture wedded with consumerism, she argues that we live in a “fourth sophistic” era, because of the “acrobatic” way words and philosophies are utilized in relation to actual truth. Lasch-Quinn argues that a return to philosophy as the art of living (not an esoteric territory claimed only by academics) offers an alternative way of life.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"bilbro\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eJeffrey Bilbro\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Curiosity, in the news context, you might think of the rubbernecking tendency: the tendency to be drawn toward the spectacular or the outrageous or the crazy. . . . It can also be a way of wanting to know stuff in order to better manipulate or control reality to get what we want. It doesn’t have to take superficial forms. You can be quite serious and still be curious. It’s about the posture toward new knowledge and the . . . ends to which you want to put this new knowledge to: Is it to better understand and love and care for creation, other people, your neighbor? Or is it to satisfy your own appetites?”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jeffrey Bilbro, author of \u003c\/em\u003eReading the Times: A Literary and Theological Inquiry into the News\u003cem\u003e (InterVarsity Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003eEnglish professor Jeffrey Bilbro explores a Christian posture toward contemporary digital media in his book \u003cem\u003eReading the Times: A Literary and Theological Inquiry into the News\u003c\/em\u003e. Bilbro orients his inquiry around three questions: “To what should we attend? How should we imagine and experience time? And how should we belong to one another?” Bilbro is not a declinist – he recognizes that people have always struggled against distraction. Nonetheless, he is concerned with how social media amplifies that tendency. He wants Christians to evaluate their understanding of time, to realize that their experience of “chronos” time (modern quantified duration) inhabits “kairos” time (time that is seasonal and patterned). This type of realignment toward the eternal can help cultivate the sort of “holy indifference” which Pascal encouraged: a stance which enables Christians to care deeply, but also rest in the providence of God.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hitz\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e \u003cem\u003eZena Hitz\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I want to distinguish between ‘knowledge as power’ in the contemporary sense — where it means .\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e. . the power to do something, the power to get things, the power to acquire, I think, in the end,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ea kind of mastery. And, rather,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eit’s the power that’s connected with one’s dignity as a human being with the growth of one’s capacities, with the development of one’s freedom, that’s a different kind of power and it’s something that you have in yourself for its own sake, and that you can maintain in situations of really extreme powerlessness.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Zena Hitz, author of \u003c\/em\u003eLost in Thought: The Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life\u003cem\u003e (Princeton University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003eZena Hitz explores the dignity and freedom possible through the pursuit of learning with her book \u003cem\u003eLost in Thought: The Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life\u003c\/em\u003e. An intellectual life is not necessarily tied to the university, according to Hitz. On the contrary, educational institutions are often captured by private interests and captive to the marketplace; they are not places where real learning can necessarily flourish. For Hitz, real learning is always hidden learning. It is not about competing for power and domination. It is also not an acquisition, a private possession. Real learning means studiousness, rather than the “love of spectacle.” And it entails a “seriousness about living and learning” which is ultimately undertaken in communion with others.     \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"nolan\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJames L. Nolan, Jr.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“It was a very exciting time in nuclear physics — the exchange of ideas and the kind of discoveries that were unfolding at a rapid pace and, you know, ‘Can we do this?’ and I think that was clearly part of it. And again, the consequences, in terms of the military application of it, I don’t think was the primary or the leading motivation for the scientists. So much so that once they saw the Trinity Test and witnessed the enormity of the explosion, many of them all of a sudden had worries. Oppenheimer famously cited the\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eBhagavad Gita,\u003cem\u003e ‘I have become Death, the destroyer of worlds.’ And there’s all of a sudden a sense of ‘What have we done? What have we created?’”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— James L. Nolan, Jr., author of \u003c\/em\u003eAtomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age\u003cem\u003e (The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003eIn the book \u003cem\u003eAtomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age\u003c\/em\u003e, sociologist James L. Nolan, Jr., tells the story of his grandfather’s medical involvement in the Manhattan Project — the World War II research and development which produced the first atomic weapons. Nolan had known the basics of his grandfather’s history in the nuclear age. However, it was only after discovering a box filled with family memorabilia that Nolan discovered the extent of his grandfather’s involvement, spanning from working on the Trinity Project to being one of the first doctors in Japan after the war. While the book is primarily a historical account, Nolan also sees this time period as a case study in the dangers of technological enthusiasm outpacing wisdom and caution, and he believes that we need to take these lessons seriously in our own day.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"barron\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eBishop Robert Barron\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Precisely because God is not a being among beings, he is not one being sort of competing for territory in the same ontological space as creatures, then God’s presence is a non-competitive one. God can come close to his creatures without compromising their integrity. And, of course, the great moment when we see this is the incarnation. The two natures coming together —‘without mixing, mingling, or confusion,’ as Chalcedon puts it. So, the integrity of Jesus’ s humanity is preserved, it’s enhanced, it’s made perfect and beautiful precisely by the closeness of God.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Bishop Robert Barron, author of \u003c\/em\u003eRenewing Our Hope: Essays for the New Evangelization\u003cem\u003e (The Catholic University of America Press, 2021)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003eOne of the central threads of Bishop Robert Barron's work through the years has been the non-competitive transcendence of God — that “God can come close to his creatures without compromising their integrity.” In his latest book, \u003cem\u003eRenewing Our Hope: Essays for the New Evangelization\u003c\/em\u003e, Bishop Barron continues exploring this theme and (among other topics) how it conflicts with the modern conception of freedom. Rather than a \"zero-sum game,\" where the existence of God means the loss of human freedom and dignity, Barron argues that God’s non-competitive transcendence means the possibility of true freedom and dignity. Bishop Barron also believes the application of this theme addresses the tragic rift between theology and spirituality — in the same way that God's existence does not denigrate human dignity, right doctrine does not denigrate the human experience. The encounter with Christ is the purpose of theology and doctrine, and Barron does his best to exemplify this in his life and work.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"blakely\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJason Blakely\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I think that actually the dominant philosophical school in the social sciences thinks of itself as on the path to articulating something akin to the natural sciences, this sort of descriptive theory that is often articulated in almost an abstraction away from the socio-political lifeworld. I mean, if you told a social scientist, ‘Are you interpreting?’ they might very well say, ‘Yes, I’m interpreting,’ but then if you looked at their actual methods and concepts, they would not show interpretive sensitivity.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jason Blakely, author of \u003c\/em\u003eWe Built Reality: How Social Sciences Infiltrated Culture, Politics, and Power\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\" align=\"right\"\u003ePolitical scientist Jason Blakely argues in his book \u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eWe Built Reality: How Social Sciences Infiltrated Culture, Politics, and Power \u003c\/em\u003ethat the social sciences have too often been treated as though they were the same as the natural sciences. In contrast to the natural sciences, where theories do not affect what is being studied, social theory massively affects and changes studies within the social sciences. When this is not recognized, the social sciences can be misused as pseudo-scientific means to justify changes in culture and politics.  As a “hermeneuticist” committed to the art of interpretation, Blakely believes that the solution to this is to treat the social sciences in a way that is more akin to the humanities, recognizing the need for interpretive sensitivity. And he calls for social scientists to become comfortable with story as a way to capture the contingent causality that is always at play in the human sciences.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2021-11-25 16:23:57" } }
Volume 152

Guests on Volume 152

ELISABETH LASCH-QUINN on the revival of interest in pre-Christian philosophical schools (in response to postmodern nihilism)
JEFFREY BILBRO on resisting the disorienting and disintegrating effects of modern media
ZENA HITZ on the love of learning and the freedom animated by the intellectual life
JAMES L. NOLAN, JR. on the lessons we should have learned from the experience of the Manhattan Project
BISHOP ROBERT BARRON on God, freedom, faith, reason, and the need to keep theology linked with sanctity
JASON BLAKELY  on how the social sciences are interpretive disciplines, more like the humanities than the “hard” sciences

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.

Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn 

“I do really think that part of what we see in these ancient schools of thought — and then, possibly in their resurgence — is that side of human beings: the intellectual and philosophical. And then, that’s not even speaking quite yet of the spiritual. But, I do think that in everyday life, we can see all around us philosophies of different kinds. You know, sometimes fragmented, but sometimes . . . speaking quite loudly, through pretty much everything that we do or say or think or even feel. . . . There is something about reality — the human reality, the reality of the human person — that can resist the incursions of various different other ways of thinking.”

— Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, author of Ars Vitae: The Fate of Inwardness and the Return of the Ancient Arts of Living (University of Notre Dame Press, 2020)

Historian Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn discusses philosophy as the art of living in her book Ars Vitae: The Fate of Inwardness and the Return of the Ancient Arts of Living. Birthed out of her deep personal interest in antiquity and her alarm at the “shrinkage” of modern life and thought, Lasch-Quinn’s book explores five ancient philosophical schools experiencing a contemporary resurgence. Describing modern society as a therapeutic culture wedded with consumerism, she argues that we live in a “fourth sophistic” era, because of the “acrobatic” way words and philosophies are utilized in relation to actual truth. Lasch-Quinn argues that a return to philosophy as the art of living (not an esoteric territory claimed only by academics) offers an alternative way of life.       

•     •     •

Jeffrey Bilbro 

“Curiosity, in the news context, you might think of the rubbernecking tendency: the tendency to be drawn toward the spectacular or the outrageous or the crazy. . . . It can also be a way of wanting to know stuff in order to better manipulate or control reality to get what we want. It doesn’t have to take superficial forms. You can be quite serious and still be curious. It’s about the posture toward new knowledge and the . . . ends to which you want to put this new knowledge to: Is it to better understand and love and care for creation, other people, your neighbor? Or is it to satisfy your own appetites?”

— Jeffrey Bilbro, author of Reading the Times: A Literary and Theological Inquiry into the News (InterVarsity Press, 2021)

English professor Jeffrey Bilbro explores a Christian posture toward contemporary digital media in his book Reading the Times: A Literary and Theological Inquiry into the News. Bilbro orients his inquiry around three questions: “To what should we attend? How should we imagine and experience time? And how should we belong to one another?” Bilbro is not a declinist – he recognizes that people have always struggled against distraction. Nonetheless, he is concerned with how social media amplifies that tendency. He wants Christians to evaluate their understanding of time, to realize that their experience of “chronos” time (modern quantified duration) inhabits “kairos” time (time that is seasonal and patterned). This type of realignment toward the eternal can help cultivate the sort of “holy indifference” which Pascal encouraged: a stance which enables Christians to care deeply, but also rest in the providence of God.       

•     •     •

Zena Hitz 

“I want to distinguish between ‘knowledge as power’ in the contemporary sense — where it means . . . the power to do something, the power to get things, the power to acquire, I think, in the end, a kind of mastery. And, rather, it’s the power that’s connected with one’s dignity as a human being with the growth of one’s capacities, with the development of one’s freedom, that’s a different kind of power and it’s something that you have in yourself for its own sake, and that you can maintain in situations of really extreme powerlessness.”

— Zena Hitz, author of Lost in Thought: The Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life (Princeton University Press, 2020)

Zena Hitz explores the dignity and freedom possible through the pursuit of learning with her book Lost in Thought: The Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life. An intellectual life is not necessarily tied to the university, according to Hitz. On the contrary, educational institutions are often captured by private interests and captive to the marketplace; they are not places where real learning can necessarily flourish. For Hitz, real learning is always hidden learning. It is not about competing for power and domination. It is also not an acquisition, a private possession. Real learning means studiousness, rather than the “love of spectacle.” And it entails a “seriousness about living and learning” which is ultimately undertaken in communion with others.     

•     •     • 

James L. Nolan, Jr.

“It was a very exciting time in nuclear physics — the exchange of ideas and the kind of discoveries that were unfolding at a rapid pace and, you know, ‘Can we do this?’ and I think that was clearly part of it. And again, the consequences, in terms of the military application of it, I don’t think was the primary or the leading motivation for the scientists. So much so that once they saw the Trinity Test and witnessed the enormity of the explosion, many of them all of a sudden had worries. Oppenheimer famously cited the Bhagavad Gita, ‘I have become Death, the destroyer of worlds.’ And there’s all of a sudden a sense of ‘What have we done? What have we created?’”

— James L. Nolan, Jr., author of Atomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age (The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2020)

In the book Atomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, sociologist James L. Nolan, Jr., tells the story of his grandfather’s medical involvement in the Manhattan Project — the World War II research and development which produced the first atomic weapons. Nolan had known the basics of his grandfather’s history in the nuclear age. However, it was only after discovering a box filled with family memorabilia that Nolan discovered the extent of his grandfather’s involvement, spanning from working on the Trinity Project to being one of the first doctors in Japan after the war. While the book is primarily a historical account, Nolan also sees this time period as a case study in the dangers of technological enthusiasm outpacing wisdom and caution, and he believes that we need to take these lessons seriously in our own day.       

•     •     • 

Bishop Robert Barron

“Precisely because God is not a being among beings, he is not one being sort of competing for territory in the same ontological space as creatures, then God’s presence is a non-competitive one. God can come close to his creatures without compromising their integrity. And, of course, the great moment when we see this is the incarnation. The two natures coming together —‘without mixing, mingling, or confusion,’ as Chalcedon puts it. So, the integrity of Jesus’ s humanity is preserved, it’s enhanced, it’s made perfect and beautiful precisely by the closeness of God.”

— Bishop Robert Barron, author of Renewing Our Hope: Essays for the New Evangelization (The Catholic University of America Press, 2021)

One of the central threads of Bishop Robert Barron's work through the years has been the non-competitive transcendence of God — that “God can come close to his creatures without compromising their integrity.” In his latest book, Renewing Our Hope: Essays for the New Evangelization, Bishop Barron continues exploring this theme and (among other topics) how it conflicts with the modern conception of freedom. Rather than a "zero-sum game," where the existence of God means the loss of human freedom and dignity, Barron argues that God’s non-competitive transcendence means the possibility of true freedom and dignity. Bishop Barron also believes the application of this theme addresses the tragic rift between theology and spirituality — in the same way that God's existence does not denigrate human dignity, right doctrine does not denigrate the human experience. The encounter with Christ is the purpose of theology and doctrine, and Barron does his best to exemplify this in his life and work.       

•     •     • 

Jason Blakely

“I think that actually the dominant philosophical school in the social sciences thinks of itself as on the path to articulating something akin to the natural sciences, this sort of descriptive theory that is often articulated in almost an abstraction away from the socio-political lifeworld. I mean, if you told a social scientist, ‘Are you interpreting?’ they might very well say, ‘Yes, I’m interpreting,’ but then if you looked at their actual methods and concepts, they would not show interpretive sensitivity.”

— Jason Blakely, author of We Built Reality: How Social Sciences Infiltrated Culture, Politics, and Power (Oxford University Press, 2020)

Political scientist Jason Blakely argues in his book We Built Reality: How Social Sciences Infiltrated Culture, Politics, and Power that the social sciences have too often been treated as though they were the same as the natural sciences. In contrast to the natural sciences, where theories do not affect what is being studied, social theory massively affects and changes studies within the social sciences. When this is not recognized, the social sciences can be misused as pseudo-scientific means to justify changes in culture and politics.  As a “hermeneuticist” committed to the art of interpretation, Blakely believes that the solution to this is to treat the social sciences in a way that is more akin to the humanities, recognizing the need for interpretive sensitivity. And he calls for social scientists to become comfortable with story as a way to capture the contingent causality that is always at play in the human sciences.       

 

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{ "product": {"id":6749040672831,"title":"Volume 151","handle":"mh-151-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 151\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#stivers\" data-mce-href=\"#stivers\"\u003eRICHARD STIVERS\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eon lessons from Jacques Ellul about \u003cstrong\u003emedia technologies and society\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#ordway\" data-mce-href=\"#ordway\"\u003eHOLLY ORDWAY\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on the surprising reading habits of \u003cstrong\u003eJ. R. R. Tolkien\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#phillips\" data-mce-href=\"#phillips\"\u003eROBIN PHILLIPS\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the challenge of sustaining a posture of \u003cstrong\u003egratitude\u003c\/strong\u003e in the midst of suffering \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#newstok\" data-mce-href=\"#newstok\"\u003eSCOTT NEWSTOK\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on why William \u003cstrong\u003eShakespeare\u003c\/strong\u003e offers valuable perspectives on the means and ends of education \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#johnson\" data-mce-href=\"#johnson\"\u003eJUNIUS JOHNSON\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on why the experience of \u003cstrong\u003ebeauty\u003c\/strong\u003e is dangerous, but necessary \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mercer-taylor\"\u003ePETER MERCER-TAYLOR\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003eearly 19th-century hymnody\u003c\/strong\u003e introduced many Americans to a repertoire of classical music\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-151-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\" target=\"_blank\"\u003ehere\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/a\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"stivers\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eRichard Stivers\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“When you’re in real dialogue with a person, when you see this other person as independent, you make yourself vulnerable. So, basically, I think wanting to stay in control, not wanting to be vulnerable, people don’t want to be hurt. They want every relationship to be pleasant and to go their way. And so, I guess this is the great danger: that the more we use social media in particular, and every other type of anonymous\/almost anonymous discourse, the less human we become. To be human is to be vulnerable, to try to understand another person, to not try to impose one’s will on a person, to listen to the other person, and these are clearly in short supply today.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Richard Stivers, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Media Creates Us in Its Image and Other Essays on Technology and Culture\u003cem\u003e (Cascade Books, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSociologist Richard Stivers argues that the destructive tendencies blamed on new technologies are actually the fulfilment of much older dynamics and priorities. In his book,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Media Creates Us in Its Image and Other Essays on Technology and Culture\u003c\/em\u003e, Stivers continues to build on the work of philosopher Jacques Ellul, unpacking how the race for efficiency — what Max Weber called the “religion of the modern world” — shapes all of life in our technological society. One area in which we see this is in the increasing abstraction of human relationships. When efficiency is prioritized over meaning, the skills to navigate real human relationships atrophy. We lose the ability to disagree or to handle awkward realities of true relationships. As Stivers warns, “The more abstract human relationships become, the more the entire human being disappears.”        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"ordway\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eHolly Ordway\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“A lot of the criticism, a lot of the scholarship, and indeed most of the popular view of Tolkien has been that he simply ignored all things modern, whether that’s theological, or philosophical, or simply chronological modernity, that he just shut himself off from it. That he wasn’t interested — at all — and he just kind of hid himself away in the Middle Ages and engaged there. And that’s completely not the case. And he actually engages quite significantly with modernity in all sorts of interesting ways.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Holly Ordway, author of \u003c\/em\u003eTolkien's Modern Reading: Middle-earth Beyond the Middle Ages\u003cem\u003e (Word on Fire Academic, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eProfessor Holly Ordway counters the assumption that J. R. R. Tolkien was stuck in the past in her book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eTolkien’s Modern Reading: Middle-earth Beyond the Middle Ages.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eOrdway claims that we don’t even recognize the stereotype that Tolkien was hopelessly nostalgic. But in fact, as she demonstrates, Tolkien engaged widely and profoundly with modern literature, philosophy, and theology. Even in terms of technology, Tolkien was no Luddite, embracing in a nuanced way many of the most up-to-date technologies of his day. One of his students called Tolkien a “translator,” a “bridge” between the Middle Ages and the modern world. Ordway argues that to be an effective translator, one must be equally comfortable in both worlds. And she claims that because Tolkien was at home in both the Modern and the Medieval, his work continues to possess deep resonance today.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"phillips\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eRobin Phillips\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Gratitude can’t be developed in isolation. Gratitude grows in an ecosystem of other virtues. And that’s another area where I think the self-help literature on gratitude goes wrong. They’ve recognized something important, which is that gratitude helps with health and well being and with joy. But it’s impossible to develop true spiritual gratitude outside of this larger ecosystem of virtues.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Robin Phillips, author of \u003c\/em\u003eGratitude in Life's Trenches: How to Experience the Good Life Even When Everything is Going Wrong\u003cem\u003e (Ancient Faith Publishing, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eRobin Phillips writes about his experience moving from a pop-culture to sacramental understanding of gratitude in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eGratitude in Life’s Trenches: How to Experience the Good Life Even When Everything is Going Wrong.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eInfluenced heavily by G. K. Chesterton and Alexander Schmemann, Phillips conveys how “embracing the dark side of life” and accepting its inherent difficulty helped him discover a more profound experience of gratitude, even in suffering. Phillips believes that gratitude requires vulnerability — it’s not a matter of either stoicism or a trivializing optimism. Gratitude also requires an “ecosystem of virtues.” It can’t be developed in isolation either from other people or from the virtues that support it. Ultimately, the church institutionalizes the practices and virtues that cultivate and sustain gratitude.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"newstok\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eScott Newstok\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I'm trying to offer a number of analogues, and models, and patterns for inspiration, but I am actually not doing the more conventional ‘how to do X’ book or self-help book where you lay out the seven habits of highly successful people or whatever the model might be. In some ways, the . . . implicit point of the book is the way to think like Shakespeare is not to follow a set pattern of things, it’s to go through a number of habit inducing practices; and, it means reading widely, and it means thinking imaginatively, and it means all kind of things, but it’s not really programmatic.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Scott Newstok, author of \u003c\/em\u003eHow to Think Like Shakespeare: Lessons from a Renaissance Education\u003cem\u003e (Princeton University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eEnglish Professor Scott Newstok sets forth Shakespeare as a guide for the craft of thought in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eHow to Think Like Shakespeare.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eCiting Shakespeare's \"sponge-like quality of mind,\" Newstok points to habits and practices that helped refine Shakespeare's native brilliance. One habit is keeping a commonplace book to collect quotations. He also highlights the pedagogical practice of imitation, a ubiquitous technique in the past. Newstok believes that while we accept unreservedly the importance of imitation in physical practices, moderns are more critical of the use of imitation in scholarly pursuits. But, while imitation can certainly be stunted into parrot-like practice, it also can help develop a rich idiosyncratic style. With all that said, Newstok is not offering a procedural account of how to think like Shakespeare; he is articulating patterns and \"habit-inducing practices\" that contain the possibility of intellectual growth.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"johnson\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJunius Johnson\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The beautiful, Plato says, is difficult. The beautiful is very powerful. The beautiful is earth-shaking and heart-breaking. And I think that’s one of the main aspects of beauty in a broken world like we live in, is that it breaks our hearts. But the things of God, when they come to break our hearts, they do so because our hearts need to be broken. They do so because our hearts are hardened into forms that become these defenses against grace. Beauty is able to come in and fracture, and create these lines in our hearts that crack open\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e—\u003cem\u003e and these fissures\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e—\u003cem\u003e and through that, grace pours.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Junius Johnson, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Father of Lights: A Theology of Beauty\u003cem\u003e (Baker Academic, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eJunius Johnson warns that the pursuit of beauty is both perilous and unavoidable in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Father of Lights: A Theology of Beauty.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eThe desire for beauty points to the desire for God. For unbelievers, that desire for beauty, Johnson says, is “the person’s heart witnessing against them,” because beauty is particularly capable of destroying modern defenses against God.  Nonetheless, humans must be wary because we are experts in twisting good into evil, “mistaking the intermediary for the ultimate.” Johnson articulates Bonaventure’s idea of “contuition” as a way to rightly align recognition of the beautiful and recognition of God. He also brings in the concept of analogy, explaining how creation is a language God invented to speak about Himself and that, therefore, “things belong to a vocabulary of the divine.”         \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mercer-taylor\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003ePeter Mercer-Taylor\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“There were hundreds and hundreds of these adaptations published in the United States. And I have not looked at, for example, the English scene nearly as much as the American one, but my strong sense is that there wasn’t nearly that amount of this sort of thing going on in England. And at the same time, England had a more robust tradition of classical music performance, that in the United States, it was just much rarer as a general rule, to actually have exposure to the classical music that these [hymn tunes] were based on. And so, in that sense, it’s as though these hymn tune adaptations were serving a more . . . central cultural purpose in the American context than in the English.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Peter Mercer-Taylor, author of \u003c\/em\u003eGems of Exquisite Beauty: How Hymnody Carried Classical Music to America\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMusicologist Peter Mercer-Taylor tells the story of how 19th-century American musicians adapted classical repertoire into hymn tunes in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eGems of Exquisite Beauty: How Hymnody Carried Classical Music to America.\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eMercer-Taylor’s research began as an extension of his Felix Mendelssohn scholarship, specifically when he began to uncover the story of\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eHark, the Herald Angels Sing.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eThis led to his discovery of many hundreds of these adaptations, specifically in the American context. While classical hymn tunes were not uncommon in England, they were more prominent in America, serving a “central cultural purpose,” since the performance of classical music was a rarity. These hymn tunes gradually fell out of vogue, but we can still see traces of the adaptations in the hymnals used today.         \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2021-09-28T22:30:00-04:00","created_at":"2021-09-20T11:31:38-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["Beauty","Classical Music","Education","Gratitude","Holly Ordway","Hymnody","J. R. R. Tolkien","Jacques Ellul","Junius Johnson","Media Technologies","Peter Mercer-Taylor","Richard Stivers","Robin Phillips","Scott Newstok","Shakespeare","Suffering"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":39458191245375,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-151-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 151","public_title":null,"options":["Default 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name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 data-mce-fragment=\"1\" style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 151\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#stivers\" data-mce-href=\"#stivers\"\u003eRICHARD STIVERS\u003c\/a\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003eon lessons from Jacques Ellul about \u003cstrong\u003emedia technologies and society\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#ordway\" data-mce-href=\"#ordway\"\u003eHOLLY ORDWAY\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on the surprising reading habits of \u003cstrong\u003eJ. R. R. Tolkien\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#phillips\" data-mce-href=\"#phillips\"\u003eROBIN PHILLIPS\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the challenge of sustaining a posture of \u003cstrong\u003egratitude\u003c\/strong\u003e in the midst of suffering \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#newstok\" data-mce-href=\"#newstok\"\u003eSCOTT NEWSTOK\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on why William \u003cstrong\u003eShakespeare\u003c\/strong\u003e offers valuable perspectives on the means and ends of education \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#johnson\" data-mce-href=\"#johnson\"\u003eJUNIUS JOHNSON\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on why the experience of \u003cstrong\u003ebeauty\u003c\/strong\u003e is dangerous, but necessary \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mercer-taylor\"\u003ePETER MERCER-TAYLOR\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003eearly 19th-century hymnody\u003c\/strong\u003e introduced many Americans to a repertoire of classical music\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-151-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\" target=\"_blank\"\u003ehere\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/a\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"stivers\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eRichard Stivers\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“When you’re in real dialogue with a person, when you see this other person as independent, you make yourself vulnerable. So, basically, I think wanting to stay in control, not wanting to be vulnerable, people don’t want to be hurt. They want every relationship to be pleasant and to go their way. And so, I guess this is the great danger: that the more we use social media in particular, and every other type of anonymous\/almost anonymous discourse, the less human we become. To be human is to be vulnerable, to try to understand another person, to not try to impose one’s will on a person, to listen to the other person, and these are clearly in short supply today.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Richard Stivers, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Media Creates Us in Its Image and Other Essays on Technology and Culture\u003cem\u003e (Cascade Books, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSociologist Richard Stivers argues that the destructive tendencies blamed on new technologies are actually the fulfilment of much older dynamics and priorities. In his book,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Media Creates Us in Its Image and Other Essays on Technology and Culture\u003c\/em\u003e, Stivers continues to build on the work of philosopher Jacques Ellul, unpacking how the race for efficiency — what Max Weber called the “religion of the modern world” — shapes all of life in our technological society. One area in which we see this is in the increasing abstraction of human relationships. When efficiency is prioritized over meaning, the skills to navigate real human relationships atrophy. We lose the ability to disagree or to handle awkward realities of true relationships. As Stivers warns, “The more abstract human relationships become, the more the entire human being disappears.”        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"ordway\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eHolly Ordway\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“A lot of the criticism, a lot of the scholarship, and indeed most of the popular view of Tolkien has been that he simply ignored all things modern, whether that’s theological, or philosophical, or simply chronological modernity, that he just shut himself off from it. That he wasn’t interested — at all — and he just kind of hid himself away in the Middle Ages and engaged there. And that’s completely not the case. And he actually engages quite significantly with modernity in all sorts of interesting ways.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Holly Ordway, author of \u003c\/em\u003eTolkien's Modern Reading: Middle-earth Beyond the Middle Ages\u003cem\u003e (Word on Fire Academic, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eProfessor Holly Ordway counters the assumption that J. R. R. Tolkien was stuck in the past in her book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eTolkien’s Modern Reading: Middle-earth Beyond the Middle Ages.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eOrdway claims that we don’t even recognize the stereotype that Tolkien was hopelessly nostalgic. But in fact, as she demonstrates, Tolkien engaged widely and profoundly with modern literature, philosophy, and theology. Even in terms of technology, Tolkien was no Luddite, embracing in a nuanced way many of the most up-to-date technologies of his day. One of his students called Tolkien a “translator,” a “bridge” between the Middle Ages and the modern world. Ordway argues that to be an effective translator, one must be equally comfortable in both worlds. And she claims that because Tolkien was at home in both the Modern and the Medieval, his work continues to possess deep resonance today.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"phillips\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eRobin Phillips\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Gratitude can’t be developed in isolation. Gratitude grows in an ecosystem of other virtues. And that’s another area where I think the self-help literature on gratitude goes wrong. They’ve recognized something important, which is that gratitude helps with health and well being and with joy. But it’s impossible to develop true spiritual gratitude outside of this larger ecosystem of virtues.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Robin Phillips, author of \u003c\/em\u003eGratitude in Life's Trenches: How to Experience the Good Life Even When Everything is Going Wrong\u003cem\u003e (Ancient Faith Publishing, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eRobin Phillips writes about his experience moving from a pop-culture to sacramental understanding of gratitude in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eGratitude in Life’s Trenches: How to Experience the Good Life Even When Everything is Going Wrong.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eInfluenced heavily by G. K. Chesterton and Alexander Schmemann, Phillips conveys how “embracing the dark side of life” and accepting its inherent difficulty helped him discover a more profound experience of gratitude, even in suffering. Phillips believes that gratitude requires vulnerability — it’s not a matter of either stoicism or a trivializing optimism. Gratitude also requires an “ecosystem of virtues.” It can’t be developed in isolation either from other people or from the virtues that support it. Ultimately, the church institutionalizes the practices and virtues that cultivate and sustain gratitude.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"newstok\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eScott Newstok\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I'm trying to offer a number of analogues, and models, and patterns for inspiration, but I am actually not doing the more conventional ‘how to do X’ book or self-help book where you lay out the seven habits of highly successful people or whatever the model might be. In some ways, the . . . implicit point of the book is the way to think like Shakespeare is not to follow a set pattern of things, it’s to go through a number of habit inducing practices; and, it means reading widely, and it means thinking imaginatively, and it means all kind of things, but it’s not really programmatic.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Scott Newstok, author of \u003c\/em\u003eHow to Think Like Shakespeare: Lessons from a Renaissance Education\u003cem\u003e (Princeton University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eEnglish Professor Scott Newstok sets forth Shakespeare as a guide for the craft of thought in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eHow to Think Like Shakespeare.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eCiting Shakespeare's \"sponge-like quality of mind,\" Newstok points to habits and practices that helped refine Shakespeare's native brilliance. One habit is keeping a commonplace book to collect quotations. He also highlights the pedagogical practice of imitation, a ubiquitous technique in the past. Newstok believes that while we accept unreservedly the importance of imitation in physical practices, moderns are more critical of the use of imitation in scholarly pursuits. But, while imitation can certainly be stunted into parrot-like practice, it also can help develop a rich idiosyncratic style. With all that said, Newstok is not offering a procedural account of how to think like Shakespeare; he is articulating patterns and \"habit-inducing practices\" that contain the possibility of intellectual growth.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"johnson\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJunius Johnson\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The beautiful, Plato says, is difficult. The beautiful is very powerful. The beautiful is earth-shaking and heart-breaking. And I think that’s one of the main aspects of beauty in a broken world like we live in, is that it breaks our hearts. But the things of God, when they come to break our hearts, they do so because our hearts need to be broken. They do so because our hearts are hardened into forms that become these defenses against grace. Beauty is able to come in and fracture, and create these lines in our hearts that crack open\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e—\u003cem\u003e and these fissures\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e—\u003cem\u003e and through that, grace pours.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Junius Johnson, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Father of Lights: A Theology of Beauty\u003cem\u003e (Baker Academic, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eJunius Johnson warns that the pursuit of beauty is both perilous and unavoidable in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Father of Lights: A Theology of Beauty.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eThe desire for beauty points to the desire for God. For unbelievers, that desire for beauty, Johnson says, is “the person’s heart witnessing against them,” because beauty is particularly capable of destroying modern defenses against God.  Nonetheless, humans must be wary because we are experts in twisting good into evil, “mistaking the intermediary for the ultimate.” Johnson articulates Bonaventure’s idea of “contuition” as a way to rightly align recognition of the beautiful and recognition of God. He also brings in the concept of analogy, explaining how creation is a language God invented to speak about Himself and that, therefore, “things belong to a vocabulary of the divine.”         \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mercer-taylor\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003ePeter Mercer-Taylor\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“There were hundreds and hundreds of these adaptations published in the United States. And I have not looked at, for example, the English scene nearly as much as the American one, but my strong sense is that there wasn’t nearly that amount of this sort of thing going on in England. And at the same time, England had a more robust tradition of classical music performance, that in the United States, it was just much rarer as a general rule, to actually have exposure to the classical music that these [hymn tunes] were based on. And so, in that sense, it’s as though these hymn tune adaptations were serving a more . . . central cultural purpose in the American context than in the English.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Peter Mercer-Taylor, author of \u003c\/em\u003eGems of Exquisite Beauty: How Hymnody Carried Classical Music to America\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMusicologist Peter Mercer-Taylor tells the story of how 19th-century American musicians adapted classical repertoire into hymn tunes in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eGems of Exquisite Beauty: How Hymnody Carried Classical Music to America.\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eMercer-Taylor’s research began as an extension of his Felix Mendelssohn scholarship, specifically when he began to uncover the story of\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eHark, the Herald Angels Sing.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eThis led to his discovery of many hundreds of these adaptations, specifically in the American context. While classical hymn tunes were not uncommon in England, they were more prominent in America, serving a “central cultural purpose,” since the performance of classical music was a rarity. These hymn tunes gradually fell out of vogue, but we can still see traces of the adaptations in the hymnals used today.         \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2021-09-01 12:06:10" } }
Volume 151

Guests on Volume 151

RICHARD STIVERS on lessons from Jacques Ellul about media technologies and society
HOLLY ORDWAY on the surprising reading habits of J. R. R. Tolkien
ROBIN PHILLIPS on the challenge of sustaining a posture of gratitude in the midst of suffering
SCOTT NEWSTOK on why William Shakespeare offers valuable perspectives on the means and ends of education
JUNIUS JOHNSON on why the experience of beauty is dangerous, but necessary
PETER MERCER-TAYLOR on how early 19th-century hymnody introduced many Americans to a repertoire of classical music

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume. 

Richard Stivers

“When you’re in real dialogue with a person, when you see this other person as independent, you make yourself vulnerable. So, basically, I think wanting to stay in control, not wanting to be vulnerable, people don’t want to be hurt. They want every relationship to be pleasant and to go their way. And so, I guess this is the great danger: that the more we use social media in particular, and every other type of anonymous/almost anonymous discourse, the less human we become. To be human is to be vulnerable, to try to understand another person, to not try to impose one’s will on a person, to listen to the other person, and these are clearly in short supply today.”

— Richard Stivers, author of The Media Creates Us in Its Image and Other Essays on Technology and Culture (Cascade Books, 2020)

Sociologist Richard Stivers argues that the destructive tendencies blamed on new technologies are actually the fulfilment of much older dynamics and priorities. In his book, The Media Creates Us in Its Image and Other Essays on Technology and Culture, Stivers continues to build on the work of philosopher Jacques Ellul, unpacking how the race for efficiency — what Max Weber called the “religion of the modern world” — shapes all of life in our technological society. One area in which we see this is in the increasing abstraction of human relationships. When efficiency is prioritized over meaning, the skills to navigate real human relationships atrophy. We lose the ability to disagree or to handle awkward realities of true relationships. As Stivers warns, “The more abstract human relationships become, the more the entire human being disappears.”       

•     •     •

Holly Ordway

“A lot of the criticism, a lot of the scholarship, and indeed most of the popular view of Tolkien has been that he simply ignored all things modern, whether that’s theological, or philosophical, or simply chronological modernity, that he just shut himself off from it. That he wasn’t interested — at all — and he just kind of hid himself away in the Middle Ages and engaged there. And that’s completely not the case. And he actually engages quite significantly with modernity in all sorts of interesting ways.”

— Holly Ordway, author of Tolkien's Modern Reading: Middle-earth Beyond the Middle Ages (Word on Fire Academic, 2020)

Professor Holly Ordway counters the assumption that J. R. R. Tolkien was stuck in the past in her book Tolkien’s Modern Reading: Middle-earth Beyond the Middle Ages. Ordway claims that we don’t even recognize the stereotype that Tolkien was hopelessly nostalgic. But in fact, as she demonstrates, Tolkien engaged widely and profoundly with modern literature, philosophy, and theology. Even in terms of technology, Tolkien was no Luddite, embracing in a nuanced way many of the most up-to-date technologies of his day. One of his students called Tolkien a “translator,” a “bridge” between the Middle Ages and the modern world. Ordway argues that to be an effective translator, one must be equally comfortable in both worlds. And she claims that because Tolkien was at home in both the Modern and the Medieval, his work continues to possess deep resonance today.       

•     •     •

Robin Phillips

“Gratitude can’t be developed in isolation. Gratitude grows in an ecosystem of other virtues. And that’s another area where I think the self-help literature on gratitude goes wrong. They’ve recognized something important, which is that gratitude helps with health and well being and with joy. But it’s impossible to develop true spiritual gratitude outside of this larger ecosystem of virtues.”

— Robin Phillips, author of Gratitude in Life's Trenches: How to Experience the Good Life Even When Everything is Going Wrong (Ancient Faith Publishing, 2020)

Robin Phillips writes about his experience moving from a pop-culture to sacramental understanding of gratitude in his book Gratitude in Life’s Trenches: How to Experience the Good Life Even When Everything is Going Wrong. Influenced heavily by G. K. Chesterton and Alexander Schmemann, Phillips conveys how “embracing the dark side of life” and accepting its inherent difficulty helped him discover a more profound experience of gratitude, even in suffering. Phillips believes that gratitude requires vulnerability — it’s not a matter of either stoicism or a trivializing optimism. Gratitude also requires an “ecosystem of virtues.” It can’t be developed in isolation either from other people or from the virtues that support it. Ultimately, the church institutionalizes the practices and virtues that cultivate and sustain gratitude.       

•     •     •

Scott Newstok

“I'm trying to offer a number of analogues, and models, and patterns for inspiration, but I am actually not doing the more conventional ‘how to do X’ book or self-help book where you lay out the seven habits of highly successful people or whatever the model might be. In some ways, the . . . implicit point of the book is the way to think like Shakespeare is not to follow a set pattern of things, it’s to go through a number of habit inducing practices; and, it means reading widely, and it means thinking imaginatively, and it means all kind of things, but it’s not really programmatic.”

— Scott Newstok, author of How to Think Like Shakespeare: Lessons from a Renaissance Education (Princeton University Press, 2020)

English Professor Scott Newstok sets forth Shakespeare as a guide for the craft of thought in his book How to Think Like Shakespeare. Citing Shakespeare's "sponge-like quality of mind," Newstok points to habits and practices that helped refine Shakespeare's native brilliance. One habit is keeping a commonplace book to collect quotations. He also highlights the pedagogical practice of imitation, a ubiquitous technique in the past. Newstok believes that while we accept unreservedly the importance of imitation in physical practices, moderns are more critical of the use of imitation in scholarly pursuits. But, while imitation can certainly be stunted into parrot-like practice, it also can help develop a rich idiosyncratic style. With all that said, Newstok is not offering a procedural account of how to think like Shakespeare; he is articulating patterns and "habit-inducing practices" that contain the possibility of intellectual growth.       

•     •     •

Junius Johnson

“The beautiful, Plato says, is difficult. The beautiful is very powerful. The beautiful is earth-shaking and heart-breaking. And I think that’s one of the main aspects of beauty in a broken world like we live in, is that it breaks our hearts. But the things of God, when they come to break our hearts, they do so because our hearts need to be broken. They do so because our hearts are hardened into forms that become these defenses against grace. Beauty is able to come in and fracture, and create these lines in our hearts that crack open  and these fissures  and through that, grace pours.”

— Junius Johnson, author of The Father of Lights: A Theology of Beauty (Baker Academic, 2020)

Junius Johnson warns that the pursuit of beauty is both perilous and unavoidable in his book The Father of Lights: A Theology of Beauty. The desire for beauty points to the desire for God. For unbelievers, that desire for beauty, Johnson says, is “the person’s heart witnessing against them,” because beauty is particularly capable of destroying modern defenses against God.  Nonetheless, humans must be wary because we are experts in twisting good into evil, “mistaking the intermediary for the ultimate.” Johnson articulates Bonaventure’s idea of “contuition” as a way to rightly align recognition of the beautiful and recognition of God. He also brings in the concept of analogy, explaining how creation is a language God invented to speak about Himself and that, therefore, “things belong to a vocabulary of the divine.”        

•     •     •

Peter Mercer-Taylor

“There were hundreds and hundreds of these adaptations published in the United States. And I have not looked at, for example, the English scene nearly as much as the American one, but my strong sense is that there wasn’t nearly that amount of this sort of thing going on in England. And at the same time, England had a more robust tradition of classical music performance, that in the United States, it was just much rarer as a general rule, to actually have exposure to the classical music that these [hymn tunes] were based on. And so, in that sense, it’s as though these hymn tune adaptations were serving a more . . . central cultural purpose in the American context than in the English.”

— Peter Mercer-Taylor, author of Gems of Exquisite Beauty: How Hymnody Carried Classical Music to America (Oxford University Press, 2020)

Musicologist Peter Mercer-Taylor tells the story of how 19th-century American musicians adapted classical repertoire into hymn tunes in his book Gems of Exquisite Beauty: How Hymnody Carried Classical Music to America. Mercer-Taylor’s research began as an extension of his Felix Mendelssohn scholarship, specifically when he began to uncover the story of Hark, the Herald Angels Sing. This led to his discovery of many hundreds of these adaptations, specifically in the American context. While classical hymn tunes were not uncommon in England, they were more prominent in America, serving a “central cultural purpose,” since the performance of classical music was a rarity. These hymn tunes gradually fell out of vogue, but we can still see traces of the adaptations in the hymnals used today.        

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{ "product": {"id":6609668800575,"title":"Volume 150","handle":"mh-150-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 150\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#smith\"\u003eDAVID I. SMITH\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how Christian schools can make wise decisions about the use of \u003cstrong\u003eeducational technologies\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#jacobsen\" data-mce-href=\"#jacobsen\"\u003eERIC O. JACOBSEN\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how living in \u003cstrong\u003ea world mediated by screens\u003c\/strong\u003e encourages loneliness\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#crawford\" data-mce-href=\"#crawford\"\u003eMATTHEW CRAWFORD\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how the “promise” of self-driving cars threatens the capacities of agency enabled by \u003cstrong\u003edriving \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#davison\" data-mce-href=\"#davison\"\u003eANDREW DAVISON\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003emetaphysical concept of participation\u003c\/strong\u003e helps us understand God’s relationship with Creation (and with us)\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#davis\" data-mce-href=\"#davis\"\u003eJOSEPH E. DAVIS\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the \u003cstrong\u003emedicalization of suffering\u003c\/strong\u003e and the reductionism promoted by neuroscience\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#deyoung\"\u003eREBECCA KONYNDYK DEYOUNG\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the wisdom of the tradition of understanding faithfulness and morality in the framework of \u003cstrong\u003evirtues, vices, and spiritual disciplines\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-150-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\" target=\"_blank\"\u003ehere\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/a\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"smith\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eDavid I. Smith\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“So many technology books . . . are either . . . ‘Technology, digital devices will save us and transform our future; there’s no going back, etc. etc.’ or ‘Digital devices are going to ruin us and destroy civilization and render us all mute’ and so on. Reality just seems to be in a more complex middle space than either of those stories — where there are always gains and losses, where when we change our technologies . . . they challenge us to figure out those gains and losses, and how to respond, and what choices to make.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— David I. Smith, author of \u003c\/em\u003eDigital Life Together: The Challenge of Technology for Christian Schools\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eEducator David I. Smith articulates the difficulties Christian schools face as they seek to use technology in a faithful way. The book he co-authored,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eDigital Life Together: The Challenge of Technology for Christian Schools,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ewas the result of a multi-year project in which the authors meticulously analyzed the technological philosophies and artifacts of several Christian schools. Smith warns that technology, mixed with modern priorities of efficiency and productivity, can lead to an unfortunate alchemy, impoverishing a rich education into “getting things done by the deadlines.” However, he wants to avoid an all-out condemnation of technology, believing that wisdom calls for a careful assessment of the gains and losses that all new technologies bring. Smith encourages school administrators to keep their first principles before them as they make each decision about whether to incorporate a new technology into the life of their school.        \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"jacobsen\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eEric O. Jacobsen\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“[Jane] Jacobs said that the city itself was a problem of organized complexity. It works, but it works in such a complex way that it defies our complete understanding. So, you make small interventions, but you pay attention to what is happening outside of your understanding. So, I say that with belonging as well. It’s not simply a matter of ‘Oh, people need a few more friendships.’ It’s not something that we’re going to solve with a really clear program like that. We need to create environments where friendship and connection are going to happen organically. It’s just really hard to engineer, it’s hard to engineer belonging. It grows in the right kind of soil.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Eric O. Jacobsen, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThree Pieces of Glass: Why We Feel Lonely in a World Mediated by Screens\u003cem\u003e (Brazos Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePastor Eric O. Jacobsen addresses modern isolation and how to foster belonging in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThree Pieces of Glass: Why We Feel Lonely in a World Mediated by Screens.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eThe title “three pieces of glass” refers to the car windshield, the television, and the cell phone. Jacobsen structures his argument around these emblematic items to illustrate how modern priorities have led to alienation from people and the places where we live. Applying his previous work on the importance of place, Jacobsen explains how urbanist Jane Jacobs argued for respectful attentiveness to “organized complexity” in the city. Jacobsen applies her ideas to what he calls “kingdom-belonging,” arguing that it’s not possible to straightforwardly\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eengineer,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003ebut only organically\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003ecultivate.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eThe belonging that grows in this way, he believes, is the subjective experience of “shalom:” the goodness and beauty of right relationships in the Kingdom of God.        \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"crawford\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMatthew Crawford\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e \u003cem\u003e“Urban driving . . . looks chaotic. It’s messy, but we’re basically improvising; we’re working it out on the fly; we’re solving problems together; we’re cooperating. For Tocqueville, that was really an important part of the democratic personality: The ability to cooperate in some practical activity, without having to be supervised (whether by some bureaucracy, or by some technology that does everything for us). So now we’re getting into the realm of political culture and sensibility. So the big worry here is that as the space for intelligent human action and skill and cooperation gets colonized by machines, our skills atrophy and I think our social intelligence is likely to atrophy — which of course leads to demands for further automation to replace trust with machine generated certainty.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Matthew Crawford, author of \u003c\/em\u003eWhy We Drive: Toward a Philosophy of the Open Road\u003cem\u003e (William Morrow, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePhilosopher and mechanic Matthew Crawford argues for the renewal of manual competence through the lens of modern driving in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eWhy We Drive: Toward a Philosophy of the Open Road.\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eProvoked by the specter of self-driving cars, Crawford laments the losses of human skill that correspond with gains in mechanical automation. For him, more automation means submitting to more bureaucracy as the car becomes a “device” comparable to a smartphone. Quoting Nietzche’s axiom that “Joy is the feeling of your powers expanding,” Crawford argues that we miss out on fundamental aspects of human experience the further we move toward automation and away from skill and responsibility. Drawing from Tocqueville’s insights into the democratic personality, Crawford ultimately holds that cultivating everyday skill (like the ability to drive well) is necessary for the “messy” realities of self-government.        \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"davison\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAndrew Davison\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“One helpful distinction that we get from theological writing is the distinction between cause in being and a cause in coming to be, initially. So, I think it would be a mistake to say that God is only cause of the world as if that were a past event; but rather . . . God is the cause of the being of the world every moment. So I think it is useful to think that there is a kind of freshness to God’s gift to us at every moment, really as fresh as the first moment of the existence of the world. We can continually see the world as given to us.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Andrew Davison, author of \u003c\/em\u003eParticipation in God: A Study in Christian Doctrine and Metaphysics\u003cem\u003e (Cambridge University Press, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTheologian and priest Andrew Davison believes that retrieving the historic doctrine of participation in God is vital to help Christians escape from the default philosophy of the age. In his recent book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eParticipation in God: A Study in Christian Doctrine and Metaphysics,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eDavison undertakes a systematic treatment of the doctrine, approaching it from two angles: Creation (all things — whether the justice of man or the greenness of trees — find their being in God) and Redemption (God has saved us in order that we may become partakers in his very nature). The doctrine of participation means reckoning with the nature of being as ongoing gift of God and with the awareness that God’s transcendence does not mean God is distant from the world — “in Him and through Him and to Him are all things.”        \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"davis\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJoseph E. Davis\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“These older concepts and language implicate us in a way that the neurobiological seems to let us . . . not implicate our own history, our own life, our own experience. . . . That kind of stuff suggests either that the story I’m telling about myself might be wrong in some fundamental way, or that I might have to really do some painful soul searching. Psychotherapy can often be quite painful, if it’s good — or counseling . . . or broader kind of dialogical thinking about our suffering and shared experience and so on. If that’s done well, it’s going to force us to confront aspects of ourselves.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Joseph E. Davis, author of \u003c\/em\u003eChemically Imbalanced: Everyday Suffering, Medication, and Our Troubled Quest for Self-Mastery\u003cem\u003e (University of Chicago Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSociologist Joseph Davis investigates the modern “healthscape” in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eChemically Imbalanced: Everyday Suffering, Medication, and Our Troubled Quest for Self-Mastery.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eHe traces how the language of psychiatry entered the popular realm around 1980, providing a new neurobiological vocabulary that was socially validated. While Davis doesn’t dismiss the neurobiological, he wants to push back on reductionist explanations which don’t account for factors like personality, history, vices, or choices. Neurobiological language isolates the problem within an individual’s (merely material) existence, rather than situating persons within a larger social and spiritual context. Recovering older language (like “alienation” or “acedia”) may help to recontextualize experience. Nonetheless, coming to terms with factors beyond the neurobiological takes courage because of the way that we are implicated and may have to confront unattractive aspects of ourselves.        \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"deyoung\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eRebecca Konyndyk DeYoung\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“What I often tell my students is ‘It’s very important to ask yourself, “Is this right thing to do?”’ That’s an important ethical question no doubt. But, it’s at least as important an ethical question to ask yourself, ‘If I do this thing today, and tomorrow, and the next day, and over and over again for the next five years, what kind of person will I become?’ And that’s a character question. So, I don’t want to reduce ethics to act-centric-only kind of thinking. . . . So, I think the vice lens is important because it narrates your ethical character over time. It says this is a life-long project of character building.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, author of \u003c\/em\u003eGlittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies\u003cem\u003e (Brazos Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePhilosophy professor Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung illuminates how the seven deadly sins work to malform the heart in her book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eGlittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eInstead of “deadly sins,” DeYoung argues that we should recover an older term, the “capital vices,” because it connotes how these sins are the principal underlying sources behind sinful actions. DeYoung situates the capital vices in the territory of habits, of accumulated patterns that become part of our ethical character through time. Explaining the need for a second edition of her book, DeYoung explains that she wrote the first edition from a philosophical perspective, not anticipating the broad audience who would read and be convicted by the book. In this edition, she focuses more explicitly on the healing and wholeness that come when we are able to name the roots of sin in our lives.        \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2021-04-29T13:20:30-04:00","created_at":"2021-04-29T12:58:46-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["Andrew Davison","Christian Education","David I. Smith","Driving","Educational Technologies","Eric O. Jacobsen","Joseph E. Davis","Loneliness","Matthew Crawford","Metaphysics","Neuroscience","Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung","Self-driving cars","Spiritual Disciplines","Technology","Vices","Virtues"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":39328619364415,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-150-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 150","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-150.png?v=1634654770","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Smith_DigitalLifeTogether.jpg?v=1634654775","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jacobsen_ThreePiecesofGlass.jpg?v=1634654775","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Crawford_WhyWeDrive.jpg?v=1634654775","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Davison_ParticipationinGod.jpg?v=1634654773","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Davis_ChemicallyImbalanced.jpg?v=1634654773","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/DeYoung_GlitteringVices.jpg?v=1634654773"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-150.png?v=1634654770","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":21195090165823,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-150.png?v=1634654770"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-150.png?v=1634654770","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":20540515614783,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"width":333,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Smith_DigitalLifeTogether.jpg?v=1634654775"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Smith_DigitalLifeTogether.jpg?v=1634654775","width":333},{"alt":null,"id":20540515680319,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":435,"width":290,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jacobsen_ThreePiecesofGlass.jpg?v=1634654775"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":435,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jacobsen_ThreePiecesofGlass.jpg?v=1634654775","width":290},{"alt":null,"id":20540515713087,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.666,"height":500,"width":333,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Crawford_WhyWeDrive.jpg?v=1634654775"},"aspect_ratio":0.666,"height":500,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Crawford_WhyWeDrive.jpg?v=1634654775","width":333},{"alt":null,"id":20540515778623,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.629,"height":499,"width":314,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Davison_ParticipationinGod.jpg?v=1634654773"},"aspect_ratio":0.629,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Davison_ParticipationinGod.jpg?v=1634654773","width":314},{"alt":null,"id":20540515844159,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"width":333,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Davis_ChemicallyImbalanced.jpg?v=1634654773"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Davis_ChemicallyImbalanced.jpg?v=1634654773","width":333},{"alt":null,"id":20540515909695,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.649,"height":499,"width":324,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/DeYoung_GlitteringVices.jpg?v=1634654773"},"aspect_ratio":0.649,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/DeYoung_GlitteringVices.jpg?v=1634654773","width":324}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 150\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#smith\"\u003eDAVID I. SMITH\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how Christian schools can make wise decisions about the use of \u003cstrong\u003eeducational technologies\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#jacobsen\" data-mce-href=\"#jacobsen\"\u003eERIC O. JACOBSEN\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how living in \u003cstrong\u003ea world mediated by screens\u003c\/strong\u003e encourages loneliness\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#crawford\" data-mce-href=\"#crawford\"\u003eMATTHEW CRAWFORD\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how the “promise” of self-driving cars threatens the capacities of agency enabled by \u003cstrong\u003edriving \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#davison\" data-mce-href=\"#davison\"\u003eANDREW DAVISON\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003emetaphysical concept of participation\u003c\/strong\u003e helps us understand God’s relationship with Creation (and with us)\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#davis\" data-mce-href=\"#davis\"\u003eJOSEPH E. DAVIS\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the \u003cstrong\u003emedicalization of suffering\u003c\/strong\u003e and the reductionism promoted by neuroscience\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#deyoung\"\u003eREBECCA KONYNDYK DEYOUNG\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e on the wisdom of the tradition of understanding faithfulness and morality in the framework of \u003cstrong\u003evirtues, vices, and spiritual disciplines\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-150-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\" target=\"_blank\"\u003ehere\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/a\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"smith\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eDavid I. Smith\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“So many technology books . . . are either . . . ‘Technology, digital devices will save us and transform our future; there’s no going back, etc. etc.’ or ‘Digital devices are going to ruin us and destroy civilization and render us all mute’ and so on. Reality just seems to be in a more complex middle space than either of those stories — where there are always gains and losses, where when we change our technologies . . . they challenge us to figure out those gains and losses, and how to respond, and what choices to make.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— David I. Smith, author of \u003c\/em\u003eDigital Life Together: The Challenge of Technology for Christian Schools\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eEducator David I. Smith articulates the difficulties Christian schools face as they seek to use technology in a faithful way. The book he co-authored,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eDigital Life Together: The Challenge of Technology for Christian Schools,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ewas the result of a multi-year project in which the authors meticulously analyzed the technological philosophies and artifacts of several Christian schools. Smith warns that technology, mixed with modern priorities of efficiency and productivity, can lead to an unfortunate alchemy, impoverishing a rich education into “getting things done by the deadlines.” However, he wants to avoid an all-out condemnation of technology, believing that wisdom calls for a careful assessment of the gains and losses that all new technologies bring. Smith encourages school administrators to keep their first principles before them as they make each decision about whether to incorporate a new technology into the life of their school.        \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"jacobsen\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eEric O. Jacobsen\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“[Jane] Jacobs said that the city itself was a problem of organized complexity. It works, but it works in such a complex way that it defies our complete understanding. So, you make small interventions, but you pay attention to what is happening outside of your understanding. So, I say that with belonging as well. It’s not simply a matter of ‘Oh, people need a few more friendships.’ It’s not something that we’re going to solve with a really clear program like that. We need to create environments where friendship and connection are going to happen organically. It’s just really hard to engineer, it’s hard to engineer belonging. It grows in the right kind of soil.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Eric O. Jacobsen, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThree Pieces of Glass: Why We Feel Lonely in a World Mediated by Screens\u003cem\u003e (Brazos Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePastor Eric O. Jacobsen addresses modern isolation and how to foster belonging in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThree Pieces of Glass: Why We Feel Lonely in a World Mediated by Screens.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eThe title “three pieces of glass” refers to the car windshield, the television, and the cell phone. Jacobsen structures his argument around these emblematic items to illustrate how modern priorities have led to alienation from people and the places where we live. Applying his previous work on the importance of place, Jacobsen explains how urbanist Jane Jacobs argued for respectful attentiveness to “organized complexity” in the city. Jacobsen applies her ideas to what he calls “kingdom-belonging,” arguing that it’s not possible to straightforwardly\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eengineer,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003ebut only organically\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003ecultivate.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eThe belonging that grows in this way, he believes, is the subjective experience of “shalom:” the goodness and beauty of right relationships in the Kingdom of God.        \u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"crawford\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMatthew Crawford\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e \u003cem\u003e“Urban driving . . . looks chaotic. It’s messy, but we’re basically improvising; we’re working it out on the fly; we’re solving problems together; we’re cooperating. For Tocqueville, that was really an important part of the democratic personality: The ability to cooperate in some practical activity, without having to be supervised (whether by some bureaucracy, or by some technology that does everything for us). So now we’re getting into the realm of political culture and sensibility. So the big worry here is that as the space for intelligent human action and skill and cooperation gets colonized by machines, our skills atrophy and I think our social intelligence is likely to atrophy — which of course leads to demands for further automation to replace trust with machine generated certainty.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Matthew Crawford, author of \u003c\/em\u003eWhy We Drive: Toward a Philosophy of the Open Road\u003cem\u003e (William Morrow, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePhilosopher and mechanic Matthew Crawford argues for the renewal of manual competence through the lens of modern driving in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eWhy We Drive: Toward a Philosophy of the Open Road.\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eProvoked by the specter of self-driving cars, Crawford laments the losses of human skill that correspond with gains in mechanical automation. For him, more automation means submitting to more bureaucracy as the car becomes a “device” comparable to a smartphone. Quoting Nietzche’s axiom that “Joy is the feeling of your powers expanding,” Crawford argues that we miss out on fundamental aspects of human experience the further we move toward automation and away from skill and responsibility. Drawing from Tocqueville’s insights into the democratic personality, Crawford ultimately holds that cultivating everyday skill (like the ability to drive well) is necessary for the “messy” realities of self-government.        \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"davison\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAndrew Davison\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“One helpful distinction that we get from theological writing is the distinction between cause in being and a cause in coming to be, initially. So, I think it would be a mistake to say that God is only cause of the world as if that were a past event; but rather . . . God is the cause of the being of the world every moment. So I think it is useful to think that there is a kind of freshness to God’s gift to us at every moment, really as fresh as the first moment of the existence of the world. We can continually see the world as given to us.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Andrew Davison, author of \u003c\/em\u003eParticipation in God: A Study in Christian Doctrine and Metaphysics\u003cem\u003e (Cambridge University Press, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTheologian and priest Andrew Davison believes that retrieving the historic doctrine of participation in God is vital to help Christians escape from the default philosophy of the age. In his recent book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eParticipation in God: A Study in Christian Doctrine and Metaphysics,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eDavison undertakes a systematic treatment of the doctrine, approaching it from two angles: Creation (all things — whether the justice of man or the greenness of trees — find their being in God) and Redemption (God has saved us in order that we may become partakers in his very nature). The doctrine of participation means reckoning with the nature of being as ongoing gift of God and with the awareness that God’s transcendence does not mean God is distant from the world — “in Him and through Him and to Him are all things.”        \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"davis\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJoseph E. Davis\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“These older concepts and language implicate us in a way that the neurobiological seems to let us . . . not implicate our own history, our own life, our own experience. . . . That kind of stuff suggests either that the story I’m telling about myself might be wrong in some fundamental way, or that I might have to really do some painful soul searching. Psychotherapy can often be quite painful, if it’s good — or counseling . . . or broader kind of dialogical thinking about our suffering and shared experience and so on. If that’s done well, it’s going to force us to confront aspects of ourselves.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Joseph E. Davis, author of \u003c\/em\u003eChemically Imbalanced: Everyday Suffering, Medication, and Our Troubled Quest for Self-Mastery\u003cem\u003e (University of Chicago Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSociologist Joseph Davis investigates the modern “healthscape” in his book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eChemically Imbalanced: Everyday Suffering, Medication, and Our Troubled Quest for Self-Mastery.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eHe traces how the language of psychiatry entered the popular realm around 1980, providing a new neurobiological vocabulary that was socially validated. While Davis doesn’t dismiss the neurobiological, he wants to push back on reductionist explanations which don’t account for factors like personality, history, vices, or choices. Neurobiological language isolates the problem within an individual’s (merely material) existence, rather than situating persons within a larger social and spiritual context. Recovering older language (like “alienation” or “acedia”) may help to recontextualize experience. Nonetheless, coming to terms with factors beyond the neurobiological takes courage because of the way that we are implicated and may have to confront unattractive aspects of ourselves.        \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"deyoung\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eRebecca Konyndyk DeYoung\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“What I often tell my students is ‘It’s very important to ask yourself, “Is this right thing to do?”’ That’s an important ethical question no doubt. But, it’s at least as important an ethical question to ask yourself, ‘If I do this thing today, and tomorrow, and the next day, and over and over again for the next five years, what kind of person will I become?’ And that’s a character question. So, I don’t want to reduce ethics to act-centric-only kind of thinking. . . . So, I think the vice lens is important because it narrates your ethical character over time. It says this is a life-long project of character building.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, author of \u003c\/em\u003eGlittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies\u003cem\u003e (Brazos Press, 2020)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePhilosophy professor Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung illuminates how the seven deadly sins work to malform the heart in her book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eGlittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eInstead of “deadly sins,” DeYoung argues that we should recover an older term, the “capital vices,” because it connotes how these sins are the principal underlying sources behind sinful actions. DeYoung situates the capital vices in the territory of habits, of accumulated patterns that become part of our ethical character through time. Explaining the need for a second edition of her book, DeYoung explains that she wrote the first edition from a philosophical perspective, not anticipating the broad audience who would read and be convicted by the book. In this edition, she focuses more explicitly on the healing and wholeness that come when we are able to name the roots of sin in our lives.        \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2021-04-20 12:15:37" } }
Volume 150

Guests on Volume 150

• DAVID I. SMITH on how Christian schools can make wise decisions about the use of educational technologies
ERIC O. JACOBSEN on how living in a world mediated by screens encourages loneliness
MATTHEW CRAWFORD on how the “promise” of self-driving cars threatens the capacities of agency enabled by driving 
ANDREW DAVISON on how the metaphysical concept of participation helps us understand God’s relationship with Creation (and with us)
JOSEPH E. DAVIS on the medicalization of suffering and the reductionism promoted by neuroscience
REBECCA KONYNDYK DEYOUNG on the wisdom of the tradition of understanding faithfulness and morality in the framework of virtues, vices, and spiritual disciplines

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume. 

David I. Smith

“So many technology books . . . are either . . . ‘Technology, digital devices will save us and transform our future; there’s no going back, etc. etc.’ or ‘Digital devices are going to ruin us and destroy civilization and render us all mute’ and so on. Reality just seems to be in a more complex middle space than either of those stories — where there are always gains and losses, where when we change our technologies . . . they challenge us to figure out those gains and losses, and how to respond, and what choices to make.”

— David I. Smith, author of Digital Life Together: The Challenge of Technology for Christian Schools (Eerdmans, 2020)

Educator David I. Smith articulates the difficulties Christian schools face as they seek to use technology in a faithful way. The book he co-authored, Digital Life Together: The Challenge of Technology for Christian Schools, was the result of a multi-year project in which the authors meticulously analyzed the technological philosophies and artifacts of several Christian schools. Smith warns that technology, mixed with modern priorities of efficiency and productivity, can lead to an unfortunate alchemy, impoverishing a rich education into “getting things done by the deadlines.” However, he wants to avoid an all-out condemnation of technology, believing that wisdom calls for a careful assessment of the gains and losses that all new technologies bring. Smith encourages school administrators to keep their first principles before them as they make each decision about whether to incorporate a new technology into the life of their school.       

•     •     •

Eric O. Jacobsen

“[Jane] Jacobs said that the city itself was a problem of organized complexity. It works, but it works in such a complex way that it defies our complete understanding. So, you make small interventions, but you pay attention to what is happening outside of your understanding. So, I say that with belonging as well. It’s not simply a matter of ‘Oh, people need a few more friendships.’ It’s not something that we’re going to solve with a really clear program like that. We need to create environments where friendship and connection are going to happen organically. It’s just really hard to engineer, it’s hard to engineer belonging. It grows in the right kind of soil.”

— Eric O. Jacobsen, author of Three Pieces of Glass: Why We Feel Lonely in a World Mediated by Screens (Brazos Press, 2020)

Pastor Eric O. Jacobsen addresses modern isolation and how to foster belonging in his book Three Pieces of Glass: Why We Feel Lonely in a World Mediated by Screens. The title “three pieces of glass” refers to the car windshield, the television, and the cell phone. Jacobsen structures his argument around these emblematic items to illustrate how modern priorities have led to alienation from people and the places where we live. Applying his previous work on the importance of place, Jacobsen explains how urbanist Jane Jacobs argued for respectful attentiveness to “organized complexity” in the city. Jacobsen applies her ideas to what he calls “kingdom-belonging,” arguing that it’s not possible to straightforwardly engineer, but only organically cultivate. The belonging that grows in this way, he believes, is the subjective experience of “shalom:” the goodness and beauty of right relationships in the Kingdom of God.       

•     •     •

Matthew Crawford

 “Urban driving . . . looks chaotic. It’s messy, but we’re basically improvising; we’re working it out on the fly; we’re solving problems together; we’re cooperating. For Tocqueville, that was really an important part of the democratic personality: The ability to cooperate in some practical activity, without having to be supervised (whether by some bureaucracy, or by some technology that does everything for us). So now we’re getting into the realm of political culture and sensibility. So the big worry here is that as the space for intelligent human action and skill and cooperation gets colonized by machines, our skills atrophy and I think our social intelligence is likely to atrophy — which of course leads to demands for further automation to replace trust with machine generated certainty.”

— Matthew Crawford, author of Why We Drive: Toward a Philosophy of the Open Road (William Morrow, 2020)

Philosopher and mechanic Matthew Crawford argues for the renewal of manual competence through the lens of modern driving in his book Why We Drive: Toward a Philosophy of the Open Road. Provoked by the specter of self-driving cars, Crawford laments the losses of human skill that correspond with gains in mechanical automation. For him, more automation means submitting to more bureaucracy as the car becomes a “device” comparable to a smartphone. Quoting Nietzche’s axiom that “Joy is the feeling of your powers expanding,” Crawford argues that we miss out on fundamental aspects of human experience the further we move toward automation and away from skill and responsibility. Drawing from Tocqueville’s insights into the democratic personality, Crawford ultimately holds that cultivating everyday skill (like the ability to drive well) is necessary for the “messy” realities of self-government.       

•     •     •

Andrew Davison

“One helpful distinction that we get from theological writing is the distinction between cause in being and a cause in coming to be, initially. So, I think it would be a mistake to say that God is only cause of the world as if that were a past event; but rather . . . God is the cause of the being of the world every moment. So I think it is useful to think that there is a kind of freshness to God’s gift to us at every moment, really as fresh as the first moment of the existence of the world. We can continually see the world as given to us.”

— Andrew Davison, author of Participation in God: A Study in Christian Doctrine and Metaphysics (Cambridge University Press, 2019)

Theologian and priest Andrew Davison believes that retrieving the historic doctrine of participation in God is vital to help Christians escape from the default philosophy of the age. In his recent book Participation in God: A Study in Christian Doctrine and Metaphysics, Davison undertakes a systematic treatment of the doctrine, approaching it from two angles: Creation (all things — whether the justice of man or the greenness of trees — find their being in God) and Redemption (God has saved us in order that we may become partakers in his very nature). The doctrine of participation means reckoning with the nature of being as ongoing gift of God and with the awareness that God’s transcendence does not mean God is distant from the world — “in Him and through Him and to Him are all things.”       

•     •     •

Joseph E. Davis

“These older concepts and language implicate us in a way that the neurobiological seems to let us . . . not implicate our own history, our own life, our own experience. . . . That kind of stuff suggests either that the story I’m telling about myself might be wrong in some fundamental way, or that I might have to really do some painful soul searching. Psychotherapy can often be quite painful, if it’s good — or counseling . . . or broader kind of dialogical thinking about our suffering and shared experience and so on. If that’s done well, it’s going to force us to confront aspects of ourselves.”

— Joseph E. Davis, author of Chemically Imbalanced: Everyday Suffering, Medication, and Our Troubled Quest for Self-Mastery (University of Chicago Press, 2020)

Sociologist Joseph Davis investigates the modern “healthscape” in his book Chemically Imbalanced: Everyday Suffering, Medication, and Our Troubled Quest for Self-Mastery. He traces how the language of psychiatry entered the popular realm around 1980, providing a new neurobiological vocabulary that was socially validated. While Davis doesn’t dismiss the neurobiological, he wants to push back on reductionist explanations which don’t account for factors like personality, history, vices, or choices. Neurobiological language isolates the problem within an individual’s (merely material) existence, rather than situating persons within a larger social and spiritual context. Recovering older language (like “alienation” or “acedia”) may help to recontextualize experience. Nonetheless, coming to terms with factors beyond the neurobiological takes courage because of the way that we are implicated and may have to confront unattractive aspects of ourselves.       

•     •     •

Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung

“What I often tell my students is ‘It’s very important to ask yourself, “Is this right thing to do?”’ That’s an important ethical question no doubt. But, it’s at least as important an ethical question to ask yourself, ‘If I do this thing today, and tomorrow, and the next day, and over and over again for the next five years, what kind of person will I become?’ And that’s a character question. So, I don’t want to reduce ethics to act-centric-only kind of thinking. . . . So, I think the vice lens is important because it narrates your ethical character over time. It says this is a life-long project of character building.”

— Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, author of Glittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies (Brazos Press, 2020)

Philosophy professor Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung illuminates how the seven deadly sins work to malform the heart in her book Glittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies. Instead of “deadly sins,” DeYoung argues that we should recover an older term, the “capital vices,” because it connotes how these sins are the principal underlying sources behind sinful actions. DeYoung situates the capital vices in the territory of habits, of accumulated patterns that become part of our ethical character through time. Explaining the need for a second edition of her book, DeYoung explains that she wrote the first edition from a philosophical perspective, not anticipating the broad audience who would read and be convicted by the book. In this edition, she focuses more explicitly on the healing and wholeness that come when we are able to name the roots of sin in our lives.       

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RICHARDSON, JR.\u003c\/strong\u003e,\u003c\/span\u003e on why the work of \u003cstrong\u003eRalph Waldo Emerson\u003c\/strong\u003e continues to attract certain religious seekers\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eROGER LUNDIN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on \u003cstrong\u003eEmerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity\u003c\/strong\u003e, and how they have seeped under the American cultural skin\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eWILFRED MCCLAY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on \u003cstrong\u003eindividualism and collectivism\u003c\/strong\u003e in American society\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eANDREW A. TADIE\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on learning to love and learn from \u003cstrong\u003eG. K. Chesterton\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eROBERT JENSON\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on why \u003cstrong\u003ethe life of the mind\u003c\/strong\u003e matters to the Church, and how it should take shape in the world\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eTED PRESCOTT\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on why artists have been attracted to abstraction, and what viewers should look for in \u003cstrong\u003eabstract art\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eTED LIBBEY\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eon \u003cstrong\u003eHaydn's\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Creation\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eElizabeth Fox-Genovese\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOn January 17, 1996, the Supreme Court heard arguments in\u003cem\u003e United States v. the Commonwealth of Virginia\u003c\/em\u003e. At stake in the case was the question of whether or not the Virginia Military Institute was guilty of violating federal regulations on gender discrimination by maintaining its male-only admission policy. One of the expert witnesses on behalf of the Citadel and Virginia Military Institute was Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, professor of Humanities and History at Emory University. Her 1991 book, \u003cem\u003eFeminism without Illusions\u003c\/em\u003e, challenges many of the inconsistencies and blind spots of contemporary feminism. A graduate of an all-women's college, she is an ardent advocate of single-sex education for men and women.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eRobert D. Richardson, Jr.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eThe figure of the sage-poet Ralph Waldo Emerson is a commanding presence in American culture. The answers he sketched out to questions of meaning, society, and individual identity continue to inform the American way of life. Those who worry that the nineteenth century figure inaugurated an unprecedented spirit of relativism and self-centeredness remember that it was Emerson who first uttered the maxim, \"Do your own thing.\" Robert Richardson published a masterful study of Emerson's life, \u003cem\u003eEmerson: The Mind on Fire\u003c\/em\u003e. It is an intellectual biography which examines the way Emerson's ideas germinated, took root, and manifested themselves in his life.\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eRoger Lundin\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eRoger Lundin is a professor of English at Wheaton College, a cultural historian, and the author of \u003cem\u003eThe Culture of Interpretation: Christian Faith and the Postmodern World\u003c\/em\u003e. One of the chapters in his book looks at the influence of Emerson's ideas on contemporary literary theory and on society at large. Lundin presents an audio essay, a musing on why Emerson's influence lingers in American culture. Specifically, he examines Emerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity and how they have been adopted by the American people.\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eWilfred McClay\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eAmerican culture has long struggled with the paradox of radical individualism coexisting with a tendency to institutionalization and bland conformism. The spirit of the 1960s and the spirit of the 1950s are both essentially American. Historian Wilfred McClay's book \u003cem\u003eThe Masterless: Self and Society in Modern America\u003c\/em\u003e traces the history of the vacillating fortunes of these two tendencies. On the one hand, the individualism of Emerson, Andrew Jackson, Charles Finney, and the frontier; on the other, the growing consolidation of power in national government and of experience in national culture. His book tells the story of a society that does not know quite what to make of authority.\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eAndrew Tadie\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eOne of the most quoted and quotable writers on matters of society and culture is G. K. Chesterton. Dr. Andrew Tadie teaches English at Seattle University and has served as co-editor of two collections of essays concerning Chesterton, the more recent entitled \u003cem\u003ePermanent Things\u003c\/em\u003e. Tadie talks about his own difficulties with Chesterton as a young man and the way he has attempted to make Chesterton accessible for his students. He gives some critique of \u003cem\u003eThe Napoleon of Notting Hill\u003c\/em\u003e, one of Chesterton's works of fiction, and examines its message about community and neighborhoods.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eRobert Jenson\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eDr. Robert Jenson is a professor of religion at St. Olaf College, and his essay, \"On the Renewing of the Mind: Reflections on the Calling of Christian Intellectuals,\" is part of a new anthology of short pieces called \u003cem\u003eEssays in Theology of Culture\u003c\/em\u003e. Dr. Jenson suggests that the crisis of modern higher education cannot be explained in terms of funding, politicization, or overspecialization but that the modern university has forgotten from where it came. The present-day university upholds the Enlightenment vision of individual and autonomous reason rather than the original vision of thinkers in communion and conversation.\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eTed Prescott\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eArt critic Ted Prescott offers a primer for understanding abstract art. For many people, abstract painting and sculpture is at best a highly specialized and technical interest, and at worst a joke. If, however, one is interested in comprehending the dynamics of twentieth-century culture, it is imperative to have some understanding of the rise of abstraction-how ideas about abstraction have evolved and how numerous social and cultural forces outside the art world influence its development.\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eTed Libbey\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Creation\u003c\/em\u003e, written by Haydn in 1796, is a compilation of settings from Genesis, the Psalms, and Milton's \u003cem\u003eParadise Lost\u003c\/em\u003e. Much historical evidence exists to suggest that Haydn considered this project one of the most meaningful efforts of his career. 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style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 20\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eELIZABETH FOX-GENOVESE\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on the benefits of \u003cstrong\u003esingle-sex education\u003c\/strong\u003e, and the confusion of \"elite\" \u003cstrong\u003efeminism\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eROBERT D. RICHARDSON, JR.\u003c\/strong\u003e,\u003c\/span\u003e on why the work of \u003cstrong\u003eRalph Waldo Emerson\u003c\/strong\u003e continues to attract certain religious seekers\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eROGER LUNDIN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on \u003cstrong\u003eEmerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity\u003c\/strong\u003e, and how they have seeped under the American cultural skin\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eWILFRED MCCLAY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on \u003cstrong\u003eindividualism and collectivism\u003c\/strong\u003e in American society\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eANDREW A. TADIE\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on learning to love and learn from \u003cstrong\u003eG. K. Chesterton\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eROBERT JENSON\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on why \u003cstrong\u003ethe life of the mind\u003c\/strong\u003e matters to the Church, and how it should take shape in the world\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eTED PRESCOTT\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on why artists have been attracted to abstraction, and what viewers should look for in \u003cstrong\u003eabstract art\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eTED LIBBEY\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eon \u003cstrong\u003eHaydn's\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Creation\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eElizabeth Fox-Genovese\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eOn January 17, 1996, the Supreme Court heard arguments in\u003cem\u003e United States v. the Commonwealth of Virginia\u003c\/em\u003e. At stake in the case was the question of whether or not the Virginia Military Institute was guilty of violating federal regulations on gender discrimination by maintaining its male-only admission policy. One of the expert witnesses on behalf of the Citadel and Virginia Military Institute was Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, professor of Humanities and History at Emory University. Her 1991 book, \u003cem\u003eFeminism without Illusions\u003c\/em\u003e, challenges many of the inconsistencies and blind spots of contemporary feminism. A graduate of an all-women's college, she is an ardent advocate of single-sex education for men and women.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eRobert D. Richardson, Jr.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eThe figure of the sage-poet Ralph Waldo Emerson is a commanding presence in American culture. The answers he sketched out to questions of meaning, society, and individual identity continue to inform the American way of life. Those who worry that the nineteenth century figure inaugurated an unprecedented spirit of relativism and self-centeredness remember that it was Emerson who first uttered the maxim, \"Do your own thing.\" Robert Richardson published a masterful study of Emerson's life, \u003cem\u003eEmerson: The Mind on Fire\u003c\/em\u003e. It is an intellectual biography which examines the way Emerson's ideas germinated, took root, and manifested themselves in his life.\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eRoger Lundin\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eRoger Lundin is a professor of English at Wheaton College, a cultural historian, and the author of \u003cem\u003eThe Culture of Interpretation: Christian Faith and the Postmodern World\u003c\/em\u003e. One of the chapters in his book looks at the influence of Emerson's ideas on contemporary literary theory and on society at large. Lundin presents an audio essay, a musing on why Emerson's influence lingers in American culture. Specifically, he examines Emerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity and how they have been adopted by the American people.\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eWilfred McClay\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eAmerican culture has long struggled with the paradox of radical individualism coexisting with a tendency to institutionalization and bland conformism. The spirit of the 1960s and the spirit of the 1950s are both essentially American. Historian Wilfred McClay's book \u003cem\u003eThe Masterless: Self and Society in Modern America\u003c\/em\u003e traces the history of the vacillating fortunes of these two tendencies. On the one hand, the individualism of Emerson, Andrew Jackson, Charles Finney, and the frontier; on the other, the growing consolidation of power in national government and of experience in national culture. His book tells the story of a society that does not know quite what to make of authority.\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eAndrew Tadie\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eOne of the most quoted and quotable writers on matters of society and culture is G. K. Chesterton. Dr. Andrew Tadie teaches English at Seattle University and has served as co-editor of two collections of essays concerning Chesterton, the more recent entitled \u003cem\u003ePermanent Things\u003c\/em\u003e. Tadie talks about his own difficulties with Chesterton as a young man and the way he has attempted to make Chesterton accessible for his students. He gives some critique of \u003cem\u003eThe Napoleon of Notting Hill\u003c\/em\u003e, one of Chesterton's works of fiction, and examines its message about community and neighborhoods.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eRobert Jenson\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eDr. Robert Jenson is a professor of religion at St. Olaf College, and his essay, \"On the Renewing of the Mind: Reflections on the Calling of Christian Intellectuals,\" is part of a new anthology of short pieces called \u003cem\u003eEssays in Theology of Culture\u003c\/em\u003e. Dr. Jenson suggests that the crisis of modern higher education cannot be explained in terms of funding, politicization, or overspecialization but that the modern university has forgotten from where it came. The present-day university upholds the Enlightenment vision of individual and autonomous reason rather than the original vision of thinkers in communion and conversation.\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eTed Prescott\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eArt critic Ted Prescott offers a primer for understanding abstract art. For many people, abstract painting and sculpture is at best a highly specialized and technical interest, and at worst a joke. If, however, one is interested in comprehending the dynamics of twentieth-century culture, it is imperative to have some understanding of the rise of abstraction-how ideas about abstraction have evolved and how numerous social and cultural forces outside the art world influence its development.\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003eTed Libbey\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Creation\u003c\/em\u003e, written by Haydn in 1796, is a compilation of settings from Genesis, the Psalms, and Milton's \u003cem\u003eParadise Lost\u003c\/em\u003e. Much historical evidence exists to suggest that Haydn considered this project one of the most meaningful efforts of his career. The musical style is reminiscent of Handel's oratorios. Haydn had heard a lot of Handel during a visit to London in 1791 and had been very impressed. In \u003cem\u003eThe Creation\u003c\/em\u003e, Haydn uses a great deal of dramatic orchestral coloring to evoke the feeling of various events in the narrative. Music critic Ted Libbey points out that in addition to this obvious musical expression, Haydn used a number of musical devices to make up for not having sets, scenery, or stage action.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "1996-05-01 12:15:37" } }
Volume 20

Guests on Volume 20

ELIZABETH FOX-GENOVESE on the benefits of single-sex education, and the confusion of "elite" feminism
ROBERT D. RICHARDSON, JR., on why the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson continues to attract certain religious seekers
ROGER LUNDIN on Emerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity, and how they have seeped under the American cultural skin
WILFRED MCCLAY on individualism and collectivism in American society
ANDREW A. TADIE on learning to love and learn from G. K. Chesterton
ROBERT JENSON on why the life of the mind matters to the Church, and how it should take shape in the world
TED PRESCOTT on why artists have been attracted to abstraction, and what viewers should look for in abstract art
• TED LIBBEY on Haydn's The Creation

 

Elizabeth Fox-Genovese

On January 17, 1996, the Supreme Court heard arguments in United States v. the Commonwealth of Virginia. At stake in the case was the question of whether or not the Virginia Military Institute was guilty of violating federal regulations on gender discrimination by maintaining its male-only admission policy. One of the expert witnesses on behalf of the Citadel and Virginia Military Institute was Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, professor of Humanities and History at Emory University. Her 1991 book, Feminism without Illusions, challenges many of the inconsistencies and blind spots of contemporary feminism. A graduate of an all-women's college, she is an ardent advocate of single-sex education for men and women.

•     •     •

Robert D. Richardson, Jr.

The figure of the sage-poet Ralph Waldo Emerson is a commanding presence in American culture. The answers he sketched out to questions of meaning, society, and individual identity continue to inform the American way of life. Those who worry that the nineteenth century figure inaugurated an unprecedented spirit of relativism and self-centeredness remember that it was Emerson who first uttered the maxim, "Do your own thing." Robert Richardson published a masterful study of Emerson's life, Emerson: The Mind on Fire. It is an intellectual biography which examines the way Emerson's ideas germinated, took root, and manifested themselves in his life.

•     •     •

Roger Lundin

Roger Lundin is a professor of English at Wheaton College, a cultural historian, and the author of The Culture of Interpretation: Christian Faith and the Postmodern World. One of the chapters in his book looks at the influence of Emerson's ideas on contemporary literary theory and on society at large. Lundin presents an audio essay, a musing on why Emerson's influence lingers in American culture. Specifically, he examines Emerson's assertion of alternatives to Christianity and how they have been adopted by the American people.

•     •     •

Wilfred McClay

American culture has long struggled with the paradox of radical individualism coexisting with a tendency to institutionalization and bland conformism. The spirit of the 1960s and the spirit of the 1950s are both essentially American. Historian Wilfred McClay's book The Masterless: Self and Society in Modern America traces the history of the vacillating fortunes of these two tendencies. On the one hand, the individualism of Emerson, Andrew Jackson, Charles Finney, and the frontier; on the other, the growing consolidation of power in national government and of experience in national culture. His book tells the story of a society that does not know quite what to make of authority.

•     •     •

Andrew Tadie

One of the most quoted and quotable writers on matters of society and culture is G. K. Chesterton. Dr. Andrew Tadie teaches English at Seattle University and has served as co-editor of two collections of essays concerning Chesterton, the more recent entitled Permanent Things. Tadie talks about his own difficulties with Chesterton as a young man and the way he has attempted to make Chesterton accessible for his students. He gives some critique of The Napoleon of Notting Hill, one of Chesterton's works of fiction, and examines its message about community and neighborhoods.

•     •     •

Robert Jenson

Dr. Robert Jenson is a professor of religion at St. Olaf College, and his essay, "On the Renewing of the Mind: Reflections on the Calling of Christian Intellectuals," is part of a new anthology of short pieces called Essays in Theology of Culture. Dr. Jenson suggests that the crisis of modern higher education cannot be explained in terms of funding, politicization, or overspecialization but that the modern university has forgotten from where it came. The present-day university upholds the Enlightenment vision of individual and autonomous reason rather than the original vision of thinkers in communion and conversation.

•     •     •

Ted Prescott

Art critic Ted Prescott offers a primer for understanding abstract art. For many people, abstract painting and sculpture is at best a highly specialized and technical interest, and at worst a joke. If, however, one is interested in comprehending the dynamics of twentieth-century culture, it is imperative to have some understanding of the rise of abstraction-how ideas about abstraction have evolved and how numerous social and cultural forces outside the art world influence its development.

•     •     •

Ted Libbey

The Creation, written by Haydn in 1796, is a compilation of settings from Genesis, the Psalms, and Milton's Paradise Lost. Much historical evidence exists to suggest that Haydn considered this project one of the most meaningful efforts of his career. The musical style is reminiscent of Handel's oratorios. Haydn had heard a lot of Handel during a visit to London in 1791 and had been very impressed. In The Creation, Haydn uses a great deal of dramatic orchestral coloring to evoke the feeling of various events in the narrative. Music critic Ted Libbey points out that in addition to this obvious musical expression, Haydn used a number of musical devices to make up for not having sets, scenery, or stage action.


 



 

 

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{ "product": {"id":4924588687423,"title":"Volume 53","handle":"mh-53-m","description":"\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 53: \u003c\/span\u003eLawrence Adams\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on the possibilities of religious pluralism in Islamic views of state and society; \u003c\/span\u003eDana Gioia\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on the craft, popularity, and significance of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; \u003c\/span\u003eElmer M. Colyer\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on theologian Thomas F. Torrance's understanding of the Incarnation; \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/r-herrera\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/r-herrera\"\u003eR. A. Herrera\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on how the Christian view of Creation and Incarnation shapes an understanding of history; \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/margaret-visser\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/margaret-visser\"\u003eMargaret Visser\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on learning to recognize the deep meaning in the design of Christian churches; and \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/joseph-pearce\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/joseph-pearce\"\u003eJoseph Pearce\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on Tolkien's other writings and on his view of myth and story.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Reform tends to be something that brings Islam back to its roots, and creates a movement that's even more antithetical to Western society in its secular form, as we know it now. It's often been said--going back to the issue of tolerance--that Islam in its early centuries was very tolerant. You often hear it said it was more tolerant than the Christianity of the time was. But what it was tolerant of was a Medieval and Ancient form of Christianity.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/lawrence-adams\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eLawrence Adams\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePolitical philosopher\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/lawrence-adams\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eLawrence Adams\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ediscusses why some strains of Islam are threatened by the concept of a secular \"New World Order.\" The Islamic worldview divides the world into places where Islam is practiced and places where it is not practiced. These are two distinct realms which ought not be conflated. Western states, however, seek homogenization, mixing religious and non-religious souls in pluralistic, secular communities. This is deeply offensive to many Islamists who do not share the West's understandings of tolerance and pluralism.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Longfellow is not simply part of American literature, he's part of American history.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/dana-gioia\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eDana Gioia\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePoet and critic\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/dana-gioia\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eDana Gioia\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eexplains why Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) is one of the three great American poets. He was one of the first to understand that accounts of American nationality had to recognize the country's \"extraordinary diversity\" in order to be truly representative of the nation. He practiced what he believed and wrote about French Canadian Catholics in the Midwest, early British Puritans in New England, and Native Americans before the \"white man\" settled in North America. He was a master at developing atmosphere in his works and was very popular even in his own lifetime; his poetry appealed to readers across every age, social class, and region in the United States. Gioia says, \"He . . . Was an extraordinarily sophisticated intellectual poet, but his gift was to take all of that learning and wear it lightly . . . And it's that combination . . . Of profound intelligence and the common touch that was Longfellow's calling card.\"\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"If [the] triune God is not a solitary God, but a being in communion . . . And if in the Incarnation Christ assumes our broken humanity and restores it to union and communion to God, than we have to think of our humanity as radically relational. We can't be fully human without being in relationships, with God and one another.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— Elmer Colyer\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eProfessor Elmer Colyer discusses Thomas F. Torrance's doctrine of the Incarnation and how it could influence the disorder found in contemporary culture. Colyer is author of\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ccite\u003eHow to Read T. F. Torrance: Understanding His Trinitarian and Scientific Theology\u003c\/cite\u003e. Contemporary culture does not fully appreciate what it means to be human; Torrance understands the Incarnation as an indication of how greatly God appreciates humanity. When Christ became incarnate he assumed humanity in its brokenness and alienation from God, restoring humanity to full communion with God. Colyer explains the importance of this reality for contemporary culture, noting particularly that humanity is made for fellowship with God and one another.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Once the world is created, then the philosophy of history becomes a possibility.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/r-herrera\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eR. A. Herrera\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePhilosopher\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/r-herrera\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eR. A. Herrera\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eexplains why a linear view of history is such an important Judeo-Christian legacy for the West. Herrera is author of\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ccite\u003eReasons for Our Rhymes: An Inquiry into the Philosophy of History\u003c\/cite\u003e. While the Greeks had \"wonderful philosophers and historians,\" history had no sense or meaning for them because they had nothing by which to order it; it was merely one cycle following another. The Judeo-Christian notion of Creation, of history as a story with a beginning and end, established an order for history while enabling an understanding of its meaning.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"We think of ourselves as so rich, but in many ways we're very, very, very poor. And I think we should reclaim the riches that are lying there waiting to be looked at in everyday life.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/margaret-visser\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eMargaret Visser\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn her book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ccite\u003eThe Geometry of Love: Space, Time, Mystery, and Meaning in an Ordinary Church\u003c\/cite\u003e, writer\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/margaret-visser\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eMargaret Visser\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003easks questions of a small church in Rome in order to discover the story it tells. Visser explains that church buildings sustain memory and meaning and have stories to tell. The memories, meaning, and stories can be discerned by attending to how the buildings are put together. Her book is an example of what it means to attend to the \"plot\" of a church, discovering meaning in what appears to be \"banal and trivial.\" Visser explains how her work considers and refutes modernity's insistence that there is no meaning in matter.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"It's paradoxical, but really myth--at least good myth, in the way that \u003ccite\u003eThe Lord of the Rings\u003c\/cite\u003e is good myth-- can be more realistic than a factually based novel.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— \u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/joseph-pearce\"\u003eJoseph Pearce\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eBiographer\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/joseph-pearce\"\u003eJoseph Pearce\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ediscusses the paradoxical nature of myth and what J. R. R. Tolkien believed about human creativity. Pearce, author of\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ccite\u003eTolkien: Man and Myth\u003c\/cite\u003e, explains that myth deals with realistic issues (theological, ethical, or philosophical, for example) in a setting that is not realistic. The advantage of mythology, he says, is that one can get to the core of truth without having the whole message become \"foggy with fact.\" Pearce also names some of the works in which Tolkien articulated why humanity is compelled to create and to tell stories. As images of The Creator and Storyteller, people can do no less.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eOn this CD bonus track, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/dana-gioia\"\u003eDana Gioia\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e talks about the sorrowful life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; the congenial literary circle that gathered around him; and the international recognition that he achieved for American letters.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2021-01-20T11:42:17-05:00","created_at":"2021-01-20T11:26:21-05:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":[],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":33336138924095,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-53-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 53","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-53.jpg?v=1611160564","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Colyer.jpg?v=1611160570","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Herrera.jpg?v=1611160585","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Pearce.jpg?v=1611160592","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Visser.jpg?v=1611160598"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-53.jpg?v=1611160564","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":8067649830975,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-53.jpg?v=1611160564"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-53.jpg?v=1611160564","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":8067649929279,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.665,"height":475,"width":316,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Colyer.jpg?v=1611160570"},"aspect_ratio":0.665,"height":475,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Colyer.jpg?v=1611160570","width":316},{"alt":null,"id":8067651043391,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":475,"width":317,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Herrera.jpg?v=1611160585"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":475,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Herrera.jpg?v=1611160585","width":317},{"alt":null,"id":8067651502143,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.617,"height":972,"width":600,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Pearce.jpg?v=1611160592"},"aspect_ratio":0.617,"height":972,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Pearce.jpg?v=1611160592","width":600},{"alt":null,"id":8067651698751,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.657,"height":475,"width":312,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Visser.jpg?v=1611160598"},"aspect_ratio":0.657,"height":475,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Visser.jpg?v=1611160598","width":312}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eGuests on Volume 53: \u003c\/span\u003eLawrence Adams\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on the possibilities of religious pluralism in Islamic views of state and society; \u003c\/span\u003eDana Gioia\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on the craft, popularity, and significance of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; \u003c\/span\u003eElmer M. Colyer\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on theologian Thomas F. Torrance's understanding of the Incarnation; \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/r-herrera\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/r-herrera\"\u003eR. A. Herrera\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on how the Christian view of Creation and Incarnation shapes an understanding of history; \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/margaret-visser\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/margaret-visser\"\u003eMargaret Visser\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on learning to recognize the deep meaning in the design of Christian churches; and \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/joseph-pearce\" data-mce-fragment=\"1\" data-mce-href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/joseph-pearce\"\u003eJoseph Pearce\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e, on Tolkien's other writings and on his view of myth and story.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Reform tends to be something that brings Islam back to its roots, and creates a movement that's even more antithetical to Western society in its secular form, as we know it now. It's often been said--going back to the issue of tolerance--that Islam in its early centuries was very tolerant. You often hear it said it was more tolerant than the Christianity of the time was. But what it was tolerant of was a Medieval and Ancient form of Christianity.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/lawrence-adams\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eLawrence Adams\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePolitical philosopher\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/lawrence-adams\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eLawrence Adams\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ediscusses why some strains of Islam are threatened by the concept of a secular \"New World Order.\" The Islamic worldview divides the world into places where Islam is practiced and places where it is not practiced. These are two distinct realms which ought not be conflated. Western states, however, seek homogenization, mixing religious and non-religious souls in pluralistic, secular communities. This is deeply offensive to many Islamists who do not share the West's understandings of tolerance and pluralism.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Longfellow is not simply part of American literature, he's part of American history.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/dana-gioia\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eDana Gioia\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePoet and critic\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/dana-gioia\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eDana Gioia\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eexplains why Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) is one of the three great American poets. He was one of the first to understand that accounts of American nationality had to recognize the country's \"extraordinary diversity\" in order to be truly representative of the nation. He practiced what he believed and wrote about French Canadian Catholics in the Midwest, early British Puritans in New England, and Native Americans before the \"white man\" settled in North America. He was a master at developing atmosphere in his works and was very popular even in his own lifetime; his poetry appealed to readers across every age, social class, and region in the United States. Gioia says, \"He . . . Was an extraordinarily sophisticated intellectual poet, but his gift was to take all of that learning and wear it lightly . . . And it's that combination . . . Of profound intelligence and the common touch that was Longfellow's calling card.\"\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"If [the] triune God is not a solitary God, but a being in communion . . . And if in the Incarnation Christ assumes our broken humanity and restores it to union and communion to God, than we have to think of our humanity as radically relational. We can't be fully human without being in relationships, with God and one another.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— Elmer Colyer\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eProfessor Elmer Colyer discusses Thomas F. Torrance's doctrine of the Incarnation and how it could influence the disorder found in contemporary culture. Colyer is author of\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ccite\u003eHow to Read T. F. Torrance: Understanding His Trinitarian and Scientific Theology\u003c\/cite\u003e. Contemporary culture does not fully appreciate what it means to be human; Torrance understands the Incarnation as an indication of how greatly God appreciates humanity. When Christ became incarnate he assumed humanity in its brokenness and alienation from God, restoring humanity to full communion with God. Colyer explains the importance of this reality for contemporary culture, noting particularly that humanity is made for fellowship with God and one another.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Once the world is created, then the philosophy of history becomes a possibility.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/r-herrera\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eR. A. Herrera\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePhilosopher\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/r-herrera\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eR. A. Herrera\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eexplains why a linear view of history is such an important Judeo-Christian legacy for the West. Herrera is author of\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ccite\u003eReasons for Our Rhymes: An Inquiry into the Philosophy of History\u003c\/cite\u003e. While the Greeks had \"wonderful philosophers and historians,\" history had no sense or meaning for them because they had nothing by which to order it; it was merely one cycle following another. The Judeo-Christian notion of Creation, of history as a story with a beginning and end, established an order for history while enabling an understanding of its meaning.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"We think of ourselves as so rich, but in many ways we're very, very, very poor. And I think we should reclaim the riches that are lying there waiting to be looked at in everyday life.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— \u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/margaret-visser\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eMargaret Visser\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn her book\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ccite\u003eThe Geometry of Love: Space, Time, Mystery, and Meaning in an Ordinary Church\u003c\/cite\u003e, writer\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/margaret-visser\" class=\"guest_format\"\u003eMargaret Visser\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003easks questions of a small church in Rome in order to discover the story it tells. Visser explains that church buildings sustain memory and meaning and have stories to tell. The memories, meaning, and stories can be discerned by attending to how the buildings are put together. Her book is an example of what it means to attend to the \"plot\" of a church, discovering meaning in what appears to be \"banal and trivial.\" Visser explains how her work considers and refutes modernity's insistence that there is no meaning in matter.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"It's paradoxical, but really myth--at least good myth, in the way that \u003ccite\u003eThe Lord of the Rings\u003c\/cite\u003e is good myth-- can be more realistic than a factually based novel.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e— \u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/joseph-pearce\"\u003eJoseph Pearce\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eBiographer\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/joseph-pearce\"\u003eJoseph Pearce\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ediscusses the paradoxical nature of myth and what J. R. R. Tolkien believed about human creativity. Pearce, author of\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ccite\u003eTolkien: Man and Myth\u003c\/cite\u003e, explains that myth deals with realistic issues (theological, ethical, or philosophical, for example) in a setting that is not realistic. The advantage of mythology, he says, is that one can get to the core of truth without having the whole message become \"foggy with fact.\" Pearce also names some of the works in which Tolkien articulated why humanity is compelled to create and to tell stories. As images of The Creator and Storyteller, people can do no less.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eOn this CD bonus track, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca class=\"guest_format\" href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/people\/dana-gioia\"\u003eDana Gioia\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e talks about the sorrowful life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; the congenial literary circle that gathered around him; and the international recognition that he achieved for American letters.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2001-12-01 14:43:11" } }
Volume 53

Guests on Volume 53: Lawrence Adams, on the possibilities of religious pluralism in Islamic views of state and society; Dana Gioia, on the craft, popularity, and significance of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; Elmer M. Colyer, on theologian Thomas F. Torrance's understanding of the Incarnation; R. A. Herrera, on how the Christian view of Creation and Incarnation shapes an understanding of history; Margaret Visser, on learning to recognize the deep meaning in the design of Christian churches; and Joseph Pearce, on Tolkien's other writings and on his view of myth and story.

 

"Reform tends to be something that brings Islam back to its roots, and creates a movement that's even more antithetical to Western society in its secular form, as we know it now. It's often been said--going back to the issue of tolerance--that Islam in its early centuries was very tolerant. You often hear it said it was more tolerant than the Christianity of the time was. But what it was tolerant of was a Medieval and Ancient form of Christianity."
— Lawrence Adams

Political philosopher Lawrence Adams discusses why some strains of Islam are threatened by the concept of a secular "New World Order." The Islamic worldview divides the world into places where Islam is practiced and places where it is not practiced. These are two distinct realms which ought not be conflated. Western states, however, seek homogenization, mixing religious and non-religious souls in pluralistic, secular communities. This is deeply offensive to many Islamists who do not share the West's understandings of tolerance and pluralism.

 

"Longfellow is not simply part of American literature, he's part of American history."
— Dana Gioia

Poet and critic Dana Gioia explains why Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) is one of the three great American poets. He was one of the first to understand that accounts of American nationality had to recognize the country's "extraordinary diversity" in order to be truly representative of the nation. He practiced what he believed and wrote about French Canadian Catholics in the Midwest, early British Puritans in New England, and Native Americans before the "white man" settled in North America. He was a master at developing atmosphere in his works and was very popular even in his own lifetime; his poetry appealed to readers across every age, social class, and region in the United States. Gioia says, "He . . . Was an extraordinarily sophisticated intellectual poet, but his gift was to take all of that learning and wear it lightly . . . And it's that combination . . . Of profound intelligence and the common touch that was Longfellow's calling card."

 

"If [the] triune God is not a solitary God, but a being in communion . . . And if in the Incarnation Christ assumes our broken humanity and restores it to union and communion to God, than we have to think of our humanity as radically relational. We can't be fully human without being in relationships, with God and one another."
— Elmer Colyer

Professor Elmer Colyer discusses Thomas F. Torrance's doctrine of the Incarnation and how it could influence the disorder found in contemporary culture. Colyer is author of How to Read T. F. Torrance: Understanding His Trinitarian and Scientific Theology. Contemporary culture does not fully appreciate what it means to be human; Torrance understands the Incarnation as an indication of how greatly God appreciates humanity. When Christ became incarnate he assumed humanity in its brokenness and alienation from God, restoring humanity to full communion with God. Colyer explains the importance of this reality for contemporary culture, noting particularly that humanity is made for fellowship with God and one another.

 

"Once the world is created, then the philosophy of history becomes a possibility."
— R. A. Herrera

Philosopher R. A. Herrera explains why a linear view of history is such an important Judeo-Christian legacy for the West. Herrera is author of Reasons for Our Rhymes: An Inquiry into the Philosophy of History. While the Greeks had "wonderful philosophers and historians," history had no sense or meaning for them because they had nothing by which to order it; it was merely one cycle following another. The Judeo-Christian notion of Creation, of history as a story with a beginning and end, established an order for history while enabling an understanding of its meaning.

 

"We think of ourselves as so rich, but in many ways we're very, very, very poor. And I think we should reclaim the riches that are lying there waiting to be looked at in everyday life."
— Margaret Visser

In her book The Geometry of Love: Space, Time, Mystery, and Meaning in an Ordinary Church, writer Margaret Visser asks questions of a small church in Rome in order to discover the story it tells. Visser explains that church buildings sustain memory and meaning and have stories to tell. The memories, meaning, and stories can be discerned by attending to how the buildings are put together. Her book is an example of what it means to attend to the "plot" of a church, discovering meaning in what appears to be "banal and trivial." Visser explains how her work considers and refutes modernity's insistence that there is no meaning in matter.

 

"It's paradoxical, but really myth--at least good myth, in the way that The Lord of the Rings is good myth-- can be more realistic than a factually based novel."
— Joseph Pearce

Biographer Joseph Pearce discusses the paradoxical nature of myth and what J. R. R. Tolkien believed about human creativity. Pearce, author of Tolkien: Man and Myth, explains that myth deals with realistic issues (theological, ethical, or philosophical, for example) in a setting that is not realistic. The advantage of mythology, he says, is that one can get to the core of truth without having the whole message become "foggy with fact." Pearce also names some of the works in which Tolkien articulated why humanity is compelled to create and to tell stories. As images of The Creator and Storyteller, people can do no less.

 

On this CD bonus track, Dana Gioia talks about the sorrowful life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; the congenial literary circle that gathered around him; and the international recognition that he achieved for American letters.

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Blake\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003eDANA GIOIA\u003c\/strong\u003e on the place of poetry and the \u003cstrong\u003eway words work\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003eMARY MIDGLEY\u003c\/strong\u003e on the ways \u003cstrong\u003escience explains reality\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003eTED LIBBEY\u003c\/strong\u003e on the life and music of \u003cstrong\u003eEdmund Rubbra\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2001-09-01 15:00:25" } }
Volume 51

Guests on Volume 51

  • NIGEL CAMERON on the challenges of bioethics and how Christians ignore them
  • DAVID BLANKENHORN on the public meaning of marriage and the private sector and the family
  • ROBERT WUTHNOW on creativity and faith
  • MORTIMER ADLER on philosophical theism and How to Think about God
  • ROGER LUNDIN on the vision of William Blake
  • DANA GIOIA on the place of poetry and the way words work
  • MARY MIDGLEY on the ways science explains reality
  • TED LIBBEY on the life and music of Edmund Rubbra
{ "product": {"id":4923745402943,"title":"Volume 40","handle":"mh-40-m","description":"\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 40\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eJOSEPH EPSTEIN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on writing essays and education through \u003cstrong\u003emagazines\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eJOHN GRAY \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eon the cultural contradictions of \u003cstrong\u003eglobal capitalism\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eKENNETH R. CRAYCRAFT, JR.\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on why the \u003cstrong\u003eFirst Amendment\u003c\/strong\u003e doesn't really protect Christian liberty\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eWILLIAM T. PIZZI\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on \u003cem\u003eTrials without Truth: Why Our System of \u003cstrong\u003eCriminal Trials\u003c\/strong\u003e Has Become an Expensive Failure and What We Need to Do to Rebuild It\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003ePAMELA WALKER LAIRD\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003enineteenth-century advertising\u003c\/strong\u003e promoted progress\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e•\u003cstrong\u003e ALBERT BORGMANN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003etechnology\u003c\/strong\u003e disengages us from experiencing reality\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eNEAL STEPHENSON\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on the \"eureka\" moments with \u003cstrong\u003ecodes and computers\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eALAN JACOBS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on why \u003cstrong\u003eHarry Potter's magic\u003c\/strong\u003e shouldn't trouble Christians\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eJoseph Epstein, essayist and editor, speaks about the art of writing. Epstein briefly tells of finding the form of the essay while in college while reading the intellectual magazines. He comments on the role of editors in the writing process. He criticizes writing on the Internet for its lack of style and notes the difference between writing on the computer versus writing for the computer. The interview concludes with comments on the educational value of magazines and the difference between editor and writer-driven composition in magazines.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eJohn Gray, author of \u003ccite\u003eFalse Dawn\u003c\/cite\u003e, argues that the globalization of the world economies according to the model of free market capitalism will have unseen and unfavorable effects on the social and political orders of the world's various nation-states. Gray argues that free markets depend on the laws and habits of a civil society; however, the relationship is parasitic because the demands of the free market deplete the foundation of those laws and habits. The demands of the free market should be tempered and understood in order to restrain this depletion. Gray fears that if cultural restraints do not curtail free market economic ideals, nations will react with large scale protectionism.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eKenneth R. Craycraft, Jr., author of \u003ccite\u003eThe American Myth of Religious Freedom\u003c\/cite\u003e, discusses the four myths of American religious freedom which he sees in the culture. One of his fundamental beliefs is that a theologically rich definition of religious liberty is at odds with the American definition of religious liberty. During the interview he details the myths which are so commonly held by American Christians and analyzes their fallacies.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eWilliam T. Pizzi comments on the defects in America's legal system. He postulates that many of the problems of the system come from values which the system embodies: a desire for procedure and a fixation on the rules. Pizzi argues that the many rules get in the way of delivering justice. The question that exposes the flaws in the system is \"What is the object of the system?\" It is not a game nor an exhibition of brilliance but rather a search for the truth. The complications of litigation obfuscate the search for truth. The rich can manipulate the system, while the poor often plea-bargain to avoid the cost of a trial. Pizzi compares the American system with others regarding the role of lawyers. Other systems do not closely identify a lawyer with his client. Thus, the defendant is more active and the trial more spontaneous and interactive.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePamela Walker Laird, author of \u003ccite\u003eAdvertising Progress: American Business and the Rise of Consumer Marketing\u003c\/cite\u003e, speaks about the theme of progress in advertising in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Ads in this age were a toast to the progress that producers had made. Thus, ads featured the wonders of factories running on electricity or a factory owner in his finely furnished home. For consumers who were enthusiastic about the fine products produced by progressive technology, products from a modern factory, or that arrived on new transportation technologies, had a sacramental nature that could link them with progress. Laird explains that ads reflect, even now, the values of their creators, who were originally the advertisers themselves, before advertising agents intervened in the process. Advertisers portrayed life as easier, more wholesome, and more prestigious if only consumers possessed the correct and progressive new products.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAlbert Borgmann, most recently author of \u003ccite\u003eHolding onto Reality: The Nature of Information at the Turn of the Millennium\u003c\/cite\u003e, speaks briefly about the history of technology and the ephemeral rewards new technology brings. 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Thus, many often have a platonic sense that they are discovering the nature of things.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAlan Jacobs interprets the magic aspect of the Harry Potter novels by J. K. Rowling. Jacob argues that framing the magic in these children's novels in the believable, coherent, yet alternative world of the novel should calm the fears of those concerned about their children reading about wizards and magic. In this world, magic is not innately evil but, like technology in ours, must be judged by the end to which it is put to use.\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2021-01-20T11:43:16-05:00","created_at":"2021-01-19T17:04:44-05:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":[],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":33335454367807,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-40-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 40","public_title":null,"options":["Default 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style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 40\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eJOSEPH EPSTEIN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on writing essays and education through \u003cstrong\u003emagazines\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eJOHN GRAY \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eon the cultural contradictions of \u003cstrong\u003eglobal capitalism\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eKENNETH R. CRAYCRAFT, JR.\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on why the \u003cstrong\u003eFirst Amendment\u003c\/strong\u003e doesn't really protect Christian liberty\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eWILLIAM T. PIZZI\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on \u003cem\u003eTrials without Truth: Why Our System of \u003cstrong\u003eCriminal Trials\u003c\/strong\u003e Has Become an Expensive Failure and What We Need to Do to Rebuild It\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003ePAMELA WALKER LAIRD\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003enineteenth-century advertising\u003c\/strong\u003e promoted progress\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e•\u003cstrong\u003e ALBERT BORGMANN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003etechnology\u003c\/strong\u003e disengages us from experiencing reality\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eNEAL STEPHENSON\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on the \"eureka\" moments with \u003cstrong\u003ecodes and computers\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003eALAN JACOBS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on why \u003cstrong\u003eHarry Potter's magic\u003c\/strong\u003e shouldn't trouble Christians\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e  \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eJoseph Epstein, essayist and editor, speaks about the art of writing. Epstein briefly tells of finding the form of the essay while in college while reading the intellectual magazines. He comments on the role of editors in the writing process. He criticizes writing on the Internet for its lack of style and notes the difference between writing on the computer versus writing for the computer. The interview concludes with comments on the educational value of magazines and the difference between editor and writer-driven composition in magazines.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eJohn Gray, author of \u003ccite\u003eFalse Dawn\u003c\/cite\u003e, argues that the globalization of the world economies according to the model of free market capitalism will have unseen and unfavorable effects on the social and political orders of the world's various nation-states. Gray argues that free markets depend on the laws and habits of a civil society; however, the relationship is parasitic because the demands of the free market deplete the foundation of those laws and habits. The demands of the free market should be tempered and understood in order to restrain this depletion. Gray fears that if cultural restraints do not curtail free market economic ideals, nations will react with large scale protectionism.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eKenneth R. Craycraft, Jr., author of \u003ccite\u003eThe American Myth of Religious Freedom\u003c\/cite\u003e, discusses the four myths of American religious freedom which he sees in the culture. One of his fundamental beliefs is that a theologically rich definition of religious liberty is at odds with the American definition of religious liberty. During the interview he details the myths which are so commonly held by American Christians and analyzes their fallacies.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eWilliam T. Pizzi comments on the defects in America's legal system. He postulates that many of the problems of the system come from values which the system embodies: a desire for procedure and a fixation on the rules. Pizzi argues that the many rules get in the way of delivering justice. The question that exposes the flaws in the system is \"What is the object of the system?\" It is not a game nor an exhibition of brilliance but rather a search for the truth. The complications of litigation obfuscate the search for truth. The rich can manipulate the system, while the poor often plea-bargain to avoid the cost of a trial. Pizzi compares the American system with others regarding the role of lawyers. Other systems do not closely identify a lawyer with his client. Thus, the defendant is more active and the trial more spontaneous and interactive.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePamela Walker Laird, author of \u003ccite\u003eAdvertising Progress: American Business and the Rise of Consumer Marketing\u003c\/cite\u003e, speaks about the theme of progress in advertising in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Ads in this age were a toast to the progress that producers had made. Thus, ads featured the wonders of factories running on electricity or a factory owner in his finely furnished home. For consumers who were enthusiastic about the fine products produced by progressive technology, products from a modern factory, or that arrived on new transportation technologies, had a sacramental nature that could link them with progress. Laird explains that ads reflect, even now, the values of their creators, who were originally the advertisers themselves, before advertising agents intervened in the process. Advertisers portrayed life as easier, more wholesome, and more prestigious if only consumers possessed the correct and progressive new products.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAlbert Borgmann, most recently author of \u003ccite\u003eHolding onto Reality: The Nature of Information at the Turn of the Millennium\u003c\/cite\u003e, speaks briefly about the history of technology and the ephemeral rewards new technology brings. Borgmann notes that Pre-modern technology required people with skill to produce a product where modern technology requires skill only for its construction not its use. Thus, in pre-modern times music required skilled musicians whereas now it only requires the flip of a switch. Borgmann gives three reasons for the promise of greater information and says that the combination of these accounts for our disappointment. He also dismisses the techno-utopia proposed by many and concludes that technology tends to detach people from a true experience of life.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eNeal Stephenson, author of \u003ccite\u003eCryptonomicon\u003c\/cite\u003e, talks about the context of his novel: the subculture of those who work to \"crack\" computer codes. Often, those who crack these codes have a feeling that they have touched something deeper than the problem. At times, the solutions come to the thinkers in an almost intuitive way. Thus, many often have a platonic sense that they are discovering the nature of things.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eAlan Jacobs interprets the magic aspect of the Harry Potter novels by J. K. Rowling. Jacob argues that framing the magic in these children's novels in the believable, coherent, yet alternative world of the novel should calm the fears of those concerned about their children reading about wizards and magic. In this world, magic is not innately evil but, like technology in ours, must be judged by the end to which it is put to use.\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "1999-11-01 15:03:22" } }
Volume 40

Guests on Volume 40

• JOSEPH EPSTEIN on writing essays and education through magazines
• JOHN GRAY on the cultural contradictions of global capitalism
• KENNETH R. CRAYCRAFT, JR. on why the First Amendment doesn't really protect Christian liberty
• WILLIAM T. PIZZI on Trials without Truth: Why Our System of Criminal Trials Has Become an Expensive Failure and What We Need to Do to Rebuild It
• PAMELA WALKER LAIRD on how nineteenth-century advertising promoted progress
 ALBERT BORGMANN on how technology disengages us from experiencing reality
• NEAL STEPHENSON on the "eureka" moments with codes and computers
• ALAN JACOBS on why Harry Potter's magic shouldn't trouble Christians

  

Joseph Epstein, essayist and editor, speaks about the art of writing. Epstein briefly tells of finding the form of the essay while in college while reading the intellectual magazines. He comments on the role of editors in the writing process. He criticizes writing on the Internet for its lack of style and notes the difference between writing on the computer versus writing for the computer. The interview concludes with comments on the educational value of magazines and the difference between editor and writer-driven composition in magazines.

John Gray, author of False Dawn, argues that the globalization of the world economies according to the model of free market capitalism will have unseen and unfavorable effects on the social and political orders of the world's various nation-states. Gray argues that free markets depend on the laws and habits of a civil society; however, the relationship is parasitic because the demands of the free market deplete the foundation of those laws and habits. The demands of the free market should be tempered and understood in order to restrain this depletion. Gray fears that if cultural restraints do not curtail free market economic ideals, nations will react with large scale protectionism.

Kenneth R. Craycraft, Jr., author of The American Myth of Religious Freedom, discusses the four myths of American religious freedom which he sees in the culture. One of his fundamental beliefs is that a theologically rich definition of religious liberty is at odds with the American definition of religious liberty. During the interview he details the myths which are so commonly held by American Christians and analyzes their fallacies.

William T. Pizzi comments on the defects in America's legal system. He postulates that many of the problems of the system come from values which the system embodies: a desire for procedure and a fixation on the rules. Pizzi argues that the many rules get in the way of delivering justice. The question that exposes the flaws in the system is "What is the object of the system?" It is not a game nor an exhibition of brilliance but rather a search for the truth. The complications of litigation obfuscate the search for truth. The rich can manipulate the system, while the poor often plea-bargain to avoid the cost of a trial. Pizzi compares the American system with others regarding the role of lawyers. Other systems do not closely identify a lawyer with his client. Thus, the defendant is more active and the trial more spontaneous and interactive.

Pamela Walker Laird, author of Advertising Progress: American Business and the Rise of Consumer Marketing, speaks about the theme of progress in advertising in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Ads in this age were a toast to the progress that producers had made. Thus, ads featured the wonders of factories running on electricity or a factory owner in his finely furnished home. For consumers who were enthusiastic about the fine products produced by progressive technology, products from a modern factory, or that arrived on new transportation technologies, had a sacramental nature that could link them with progress. Laird explains that ads reflect, even now, the values of their creators, who were originally the advertisers themselves, before advertising agents intervened in the process. Advertisers portrayed life as easier, more wholesome, and more prestigious if only consumers possessed the correct and progressive new products.

Albert Borgmann, most recently author of Holding onto Reality: The Nature of Information at the Turn of the Millennium, speaks briefly about the history of technology and the ephemeral rewards new technology brings. Borgmann notes that Pre-modern technology required people with skill to produce a product where modern technology requires skill only for its construction not its use. Thus, in pre-modern times music required skilled musicians whereas now it only requires the flip of a switch. Borgmann gives three reasons for the promise of greater information and says that the combination of these accounts for our disappointment. He also dismisses the techno-utopia proposed by many and concludes that technology tends to detach people from a true experience of life.

Neal Stephenson, author of Cryptonomicon, talks about the context of his novel: the subculture of those who work to "crack" computer codes. Often, those who crack these codes have a feeling that they have touched something deeper than the problem. At times, the solutions come to the thinkers in an almost intuitive way. Thus, many often have a platonic sense that they are discovering the nature of things.

Alan Jacobs interprets the magic aspect of the Harry Potter novels by J. K. Rowling. Jacob argues that framing the magic in these children's novels in the believable, coherent, yet alternative world of the novel should calm the fears of those concerned about their children reading about wizards and magic. In this world, magic is not innately evil but, like technology in ours, must be judged by the end to which it is put to use.

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{ "product": {"id":4903245873215,"title":"Volume 149","handle":"mh-149-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eGuests on Volume 149\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#johnson\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDRU JOHNSON\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003erituals\u003c\/strong\u003e serve to shape our understanding of God and Creation\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#porter\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSTEVEN L. PORTER\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003c\/a\u003eon the causes and consequences of the loss of confidence in the \u003cstrong\u003erationality of morality\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hutter\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eREINHARD HÜTTER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on why Christian \u003cstrong\u003eethics\u003c\/strong\u003e must be ordered by Christian \u003cstrong\u003eeschatology\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#levering\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMATTHEW LEVERING\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the theological and philosophical concerns of \u003cstrong\u003eHans Urs von Balthasar\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#jeffrey\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDAVID LYLE JEFFREY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the influence of the \u003cstrong\u003eBible on English poetry\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#phillips\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCHRISTOPHER PHILLIPS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the cultural and spiritual effects of hymns and the “thingness” of \u003cstrong\u003ehymnals\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-149-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"johnson\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDru Johnson\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e“\u003cem\u003eEvery good endeavor to understand the world contains a lot of ritual in it — and rituals where you don’t necessarily understand what you’re doing, or why you are doing them at first. . . . The idea that you should be able to understand it from the outset, before you set foot into any activity, is kind of absurd in all of life. So I don’t know why we think it would be any different if God is enjoining us through our bodies into his world, to see it properly.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Dru Johnson, author of \u003c\/em\u003eHuman Rites: The Power of Rituals, Habits, and Sacraments\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eBiblical scholar Dru Johnson highlights the unique way the Scriptures link ritual with epistemology; what we know is inextricable from what we do. Human life is inescapably ritualistic, he argues, even if rituals are spurned as inauthentic or superficial. Approaching ritual studies from a Hebrew Bible perspective, Johnson views ritual as the umbrella concept for liturgy and sacrament. In his experience, the ritual nature of daily life garners resistance from Christians who want the sacraments to be almost bizarrely special. But discerning the ritual nature of all life helps us to discern the sacramentality of all life — guided by the sacredness of a particular meal and bath. Like poetry and story, the sacraments are irreducible; they cannot be boiled down to propositional statements. We are to “theologize through performance” because as Johnson explains, “The body is not ‘second-tier’ in how we understand the world.”\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"porter\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSteven L. Porter\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e“\u003cem\u003eTo tolerate someone else’s opinion and to respect their opinion actually needs to be grounded in knowledge, in moral knowledge, because . . . [toleration] is a form of respect; it’s to give the other person the dignity to hold the view that they hold, and to be as sympathetic and understanding as we possibly can as to the reasons they hold that. So knowledge actually engenders a kind of humility, a kind of open-mindedness, an actual respect and ability to listen to the other side without immediately thinking of how I’m going to respond without even understanding their arguments.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Steven L. Porter, editor of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Disappearance of Moral Knowledge\u003cem\u003e (Routledge, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eSteven L. Porter discusses \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Disappearance of Moral Knowledge,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e an unfinished manuscript (which he helped to complete) by the late philosopher Dallas Willard. The book traces how modern culture lost the assumption that ethical claims are matters of knowledge, which can be right or wrong. Without a basis in rationality, morality is confined to private opinion, pulled along by rhetoric and tribalism. While Willard held that this disappearance primarily resulted from sociological factors, nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophers did not help matters, as they failed to provide an adequate foundation to ground ethical theory. As Porter explains, Willard grounds moral knowledge conclusively in love — an embrace of the other. Ultimately, toleration and humility grow out of recovering moral knowledge, making space for respect and complexity in the mutual pursuit of what is right.  \u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hutter\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eReinhard Hütter\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e“\u003cem\u003eIn Thomas Aquinas, eschatology runs all the way through. . . . The eschaton describes the final end of humans with God. And the final end is, in a certain way, already thematized right at the beginning [of the \u003c\/em\u003eSumma Theologiae]\u003cem\u003e. . . . If Christian theology is not all the way shot through by eschatology, it’s not Christian theology. It’s something else. Christian theology is all the way eschatological . . . because it’s always a connection — in the encounter with Christ, it’s a connection, not only with God . . . but also an encounter with that end to which God has called humans.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Reinhard Hütter, author of \u003c\/em\u003eBound for Beatitude: A Thomistic Study in Eschatology and Ethics\u003cem\u003e (Catholic University of America Press, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eTheologian Reinhard Hütter argues that Christian theology must be oriented toward the beatific vision — eschatalogical “all the way through.” While many modern Christians anticipate an Edenic paradise as the ultimate \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etelos,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e this parts from the Church’s tradition, which recognized that Adam and Eve were made for something \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003ebeyond\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e Paradise: for union with God Himself. Hütter sets forth Thomas Aquinas’s theology as a corrective to modern underreaching eschatology. From the beginning of the \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eSumma Theologiae,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003eAquinas weaved in eschatology. He taught that each soul is directly created by God \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eex nihilo\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e and that, therefore, the end of each soul is union with God. Despite the anti-human agendas of modernity, Hütter follows Aquinas and encourages that the transcendent will always break through, because the human soul is ordered to God and created for union with Him. \u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"levering\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMatthew Levering\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Balthasar believes that the credibility of Christianity ultimately rests on love. He has a book called \u003c\/em\u003eLove Alone is Credible\u003cem\u003e because Christ alone reveals the form of divine love. And so the ultimate apologetic for the truth of Christianity is love. . . . And Nietzsche is a factor because Nietzsche cuts through this rationalism of the day and insists upon the role of the will. Now Balthasar does not accept the will to power, but he argues repeatedly that truth — when you uncover truth, when you get to the bottom of it — you see that truth is the will to love, the divine will to love.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Matthew Levering, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Achievement of Hans Urs von Balthasar: An Introduction to His Trilogy\u003cem\u003e (Catholic University of America Press, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eTheologian Matthew Levering discusses how Hans Urs von Balthasar engaged with the philosophies of Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche in order to spread the Christian faith among intellectuals. Balthasar believed that Catholic Neo-scholastics had an overly negative response to Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche, shunning them as a \"triad of heretics.\" Instead, Balthasar took these philosophers seriously, with a view towards apologetics. Responding to Nietzsche, for example, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003eBalthasar rejected the overly propositional Christianity of Neo-scholasticism, arguing that truth does involve the will, as Nietzsche insisted, but \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003enot\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e the will to power — rather the will to love. He held that self-surrender in love is the ground of all knowing, all beauty. For Hans Urs von Balthasar, as Levering explains, love is what makes Christianity credible. \u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"jeffrey\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDavid Lyle Jeffrey\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“John Donne is keenly aware that when God speaks most authoritatively concerning his people, from the prophets on, through to the end of the Scriptures, and Jesus as well — when he teaches something that’s authoritative, that is absolutely necessary for the disciples to know, he resorts to a form of poetry. When Donne calls the Lord a ‘metaphorical God,’ what he means is that God, when he reaches out to us because he desires that we understand Him, recognizes the need for poetry both to communicate -- but it also becomes the stamp of Him speaking.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— David Lyle Jeffrey, author of \u003c\/em\u003eScripture and the English Poetic Tradition\u003cem\u003e (Baker Academic, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eEnglish professor David Lyle Jeffrey emphasizes the effect of “magnificent fruitfulness” that Scripture had upon the writings of English poets. Reason is not the only conduit of reality, Jeffrey observes, which is why God speaks so frequently through poetry in the Scriptures (and why John Donne can call him a “metaphorical God”). Beginning with medieval poetry, Jeffrey describes the surprising way Italian dramatic sermons, encouraged by St. Francis of Assisi, made the Gospel accessible to the imagination and later influenced English poets and Biblical translators. These dramatic sermons led to Gospel paraphrases which laid a foundation for translating Scripture into the vernacular, culminating in the incomparable King James Version. Accentuating the aural and oral nature of the English Scriptures, Jeffrey makes the case that beautiful poetic language is not only self-revelatory, but is also a stamp of authoritative divine revelation. \u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"phillips\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eChristopher Phillips\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“One of the things that I really found really exciting about this project was realizing how many things, not just people did with hymns, but how many things hymns enabled people to do and empowered them to do. To think that a creative mind as powerful as William Cowper, who would write everything from very witty rewrites of Horace and Pindar to scathing attacks on the evils of slavery to one of the most incisive descriptions of what depression fells like that a poet’s ever written. . . . He gets to it through what had been written off as this very conventional means.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Christopher Phillips, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Hymnal: A Reading History\u003cem\u003e (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eEnglish Professor Christopher N. Phillips discusses hymnals as physical artifacts and how these “lived-with books” have formed devotion at church, school, and home. While teaching through Susan Warner’s nineteenth-century novel \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Wide, Wide World,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e Philips noticed how hymnbooks kept appearing in the text. This led him to focus on the “subplot of the hymnbook” within the novel, and how it “traces a growth of the self.” Making application beyond the novel, Phillips highlights how physical things like hymnbooks are deeply formative, in fellowship with practices and rituals. Philips also explores how the poetic form of hymns — sometimes disparaged as conventional — actually  “enabled and empowered” some poets (such as Cowper, Frost, and Dickinson) toward original creative expression.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2021-01-04T13:42:52-05:00","created_at":"2021-01-04T12:26:25-05:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["Christian ethics","Christopher Phillips","David Lyle Jeffrey","Dru Johnson","English poetry","Hans Urs von Balthasar","Hymnals","Hymns","Matthew Levering","Morality","Reinhard Hutter","Rituals","Steven L. Porter"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":33293561692223,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-149-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 149","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-149.jpg?v=1609785523","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Johnson_HumanRites.jpg?v=1609785707","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Porter-Willard_TheDisappearanceofMoralKnowledge.jpg?v=1609785724","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hutter_BoundforBeatitude.jpg?v=1609785737","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Levering_HansUrsvonBalthasar.jpg?v=1609785744","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jeffrey_ScriptureandtheEnglishPoeticImagination.jpg?v=1609785751","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Phillips_TheHymnal.jpg?v=1609785760"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-149.jpg?v=1609785523","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7997951443007,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-149.jpg?v=1609785523"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-149.jpg?v=1609785523","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":7997965664319,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.649,"height":499,"width":324,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Johnson_HumanRites.jpg?v=1609785707"},"aspect_ratio":0.649,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Johnson_HumanRites.jpg?v=1609785707","width":324},{"alt":null,"id":7997966909503,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"width":333,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Porter-Willard_TheDisappearanceofMoralKnowledge.jpg?v=1609785724"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Porter-Willard_TheDisappearanceofMoralKnowledge.jpg?v=1609785724","width":333},{"alt":null,"id":7997967368255,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.647,"height":921,"width":596,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hutter_BoundforBeatitude.jpg?v=1609785737"},"aspect_ratio":0.647,"height":921,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hutter_BoundforBeatitude.jpg?v=1609785737","width":596},{"alt":null,"id":7997967564863,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.647,"height":921,"width":596,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Levering_HansUrsvonBalthasar.jpg?v=1609785744"},"aspect_ratio":0.647,"height":921,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Levering_HansUrsvonBalthasar.jpg?v=1609785744","width":596},{"alt":null,"id":7997968285759,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.663,"height":499,"width":331,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jeffrey_ScriptureandtheEnglishPoeticImagination.jpg?v=1609785751"},"aspect_ratio":0.663,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jeffrey_ScriptureandtheEnglishPoeticImagination.jpg?v=1609785751","width":331},{"alt":null,"id":7997968908351,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.651,"height":499,"width":325,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Phillips_TheHymnal.jpg?v=1609785760"},"aspect_ratio":0.651,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Phillips_TheHymnal.jpg?v=1609785760","width":325}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eGuests on Volume 149\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#johnson\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDRU JOHNSON\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003erituals\u003c\/strong\u003e serve to shape our understanding of God and Creation\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#porter\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSTEVEN L. PORTER\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003c\/a\u003eon the causes and consequences of the loss of confidence in the \u003cstrong\u003erationality of morality\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hutter\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eREINHARD HÜTTER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on why Christian \u003cstrong\u003eethics\u003c\/strong\u003e must be ordered by Christian \u003cstrong\u003eeschatology\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#levering\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMATTHEW LEVERING\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the theological and philosophical concerns of \u003cstrong\u003eHans Urs von Balthasar\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#jeffrey\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDAVID LYLE JEFFREY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the influence of the \u003cstrong\u003eBible on English poetry\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#phillips\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCHRISTOPHER PHILLIPS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the cultural and spiritual effects of hymns and the “thingness” of \u003cstrong\u003ehymnals\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-149-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"johnson\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDru Johnson\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e“\u003cem\u003eEvery good endeavor to understand the world contains a lot of ritual in it — and rituals where you don’t necessarily understand what you’re doing, or why you are doing them at first. . . . The idea that you should be able to understand it from the outset, before you set foot into any activity, is kind of absurd in all of life. So I don’t know why we think it would be any different if God is enjoining us through our bodies into his world, to see it properly.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Dru Johnson, author of \u003c\/em\u003eHuman Rites: The Power of Rituals, Habits, and Sacraments\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eBiblical scholar Dru Johnson highlights the unique way the Scriptures link ritual with epistemology; what we know is inextricable from what we do. Human life is inescapably ritualistic, he argues, even if rituals are spurned as inauthentic or superficial. Approaching ritual studies from a Hebrew Bible perspective, Johnson views ritual as the umbrella concept for liturgy and sacrament. In his experience, the ritual nature of daily life garners resistance from Christians who want the sacraments to be almost bizarrely special. But discerning the ritual nature of all life helps us to discern the sacramentality of all life — guided by the sacredness of a particular meal and bath. Like poetry and story, the sacraments are irreducible; they cannot be boiled down to propositional statements. We are to “theologize through performance” because as Johnson explains, “The body is not ‘second-tier’ in how we understand the world.”\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"porter\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSteven L. Porter\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e“\u003cem\u003eTo tolerate someone else’s opinion and to respect their opinion actually needs to be grounded in knowledge, in moral knowledge, because . . . [toleration] is a form of respect; it’s to give the other person the dignity to hold the view that they hold, and to be as sympathetic and understanding as we possibly can as to the reasons they hold that. So knowledge actually engenders a kind of humility, a kind of open-mindedness, an actual respect and ability to listen to the other side without immediately thinking of how I’m going to respond without even understanding their arguments.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Steven L. Porter, editor of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Disappearance of Moral Knowledge\u003cem\u003e (Routledge, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eSteven L. Porter discusses \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Disappearance of Moral Knowledge,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e an unfinished manuscript (which he helped to complete) by the late philosopher Dallas Willard. The book traces how modern culture lost the assumption that ethical claims are matters of knowledge, which can be right or wrong. Without a basis in rationality, morality is confined to private opinion, pulled along by rhetoric and tribalism. While Willard held that this disappearance primarily resulted from sociological factors, nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophers did not help matters, as they failed to provide an adequate foundation to ground ethical theory. As Porter explains, Willard grounds moral knowledge conclusively in love — an embrace of the other. Ultimately, toleration and humility grow out of recovering moral knowledge, making space for respect and complexity in the mutual pursuit of what is right.  \u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hutter\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eReinhard Hütter\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e“\u003cem\u003eIn Thomas Aquinas, eschatology runs all the way through. . . . The eschaton describes the final end of humans with God. And the final end is, in a certain way, already thematized right at the beginning [of the \u003c\/em\u003eSumma Theologiae]\u003cem\u003e. . . . If Christian theology is not all the way shot through by eschatology, it’s not Christian theology. It’s something else. Christian theology is all the way eschatological . . . because it’s always a connection — in the encounter with Christ, it’s a connection, not only with God . . . but also an encounter with that end to which God has called humans.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Reinhard Hütter, author of \u003c\/em\u003eBound for Beatitude: A Thomistic Study in Eschatology and Ethics\u003cem\u003e (Catholic University of America Press, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eTheologian Reinhard Hütter argues that Christian theology must be oriented toward the beatific vision — eschatalogical “all the way through.” While many modern Christians anticipate an Edenic paradise as the ultimate \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etelos,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e this parts from the Church’s tradition, which recognized that Adam and Eve were made for something \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003ebeyond\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e Paradise: for union with God Himself. Hütter sets forth Thomas Aquinas’s theology as a corrective to modern underreaching eschatology. From the beginning of the \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eSumma Theologiae,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003eAquinas weaved in eschatology. He taught that each soul is directly created by God \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eex nihilo\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e and that, therefore, the end of each soul is union with God. Despite the anti-human agendas of modernity, Hütter follows Aquinas and encourages that the transcendent will always break through, because the human soul is ordered to God and created for union with Him. \u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"levering\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMatthew Levering\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Balthasar believes that the credibility of Christianity ultimately rests on love. He has a book called \u003c\/em\u003eLove Alone is Credible\u003cem\u003e because Christ alone reveals the form of divine love. And so the ultimate apologetic for the truth of Christianity is love. . . . And Nietzsche is a factor because Nietzsche cuts through this rationalism of the day and insists upon the role of the will. Now Balthasar does not accept the will to power, but he argues repeatedly that truth — when you uncover truth, when you get to the bottom of it — you see that truth is the will to love, the divine will to love.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Matthew Levering, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Achievement of Hans Urs von Balthasar: An Introduction to His Trilogy\u003cem\u003e (Catholic University of America Press, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eTheologian Matthew Levering discusses how Hans Urs von Balthasar engaged with the philosophies of Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche in order to spread the Christian faith among intellectuals. Balthasar believed that Catholic Neo-scholastics had an overly negative response to Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche, shunning them as a \"triad of heretics.\" Instead, Balthasar took these philosophers seriously, with a view towards apologetics. Responding to Nietzsche, for example, \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003eBalthasar rejected the overly propositional Christianity of Neo-scholasticism, arguing that truth does involve the will, as Nietzsche insisted, but \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003enot\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e the will to power — rather the will to love. He held that self-surrender in love is the ground of all knowing, all beauty. For Hans Urs von Balthasar, as Levering explains, love is what makes Christianity credible. \u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"jeffrey\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDavid Lyle Jeffrey\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“John Donne is keenly aware that when God speaks most authoritatively concerning his people, from the prophets on, through to the end of the Scriptures, and Jesus as well — when he teaches something that’s authoritative, that is absolutely necessary for the disciples to know, he resorts to a form of poetry. When Donne calls the Lord a ‘metaphorical God,’ what he means is that God, when he reaches out to us because he desires that we understand Him, recognizes the need for poetry both to communicate -- but it also becomes the stamp of Him speaking.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— David Lyle Jeffrey, author of \u003c\/em\u003eScripture and the English Poetic Tradition\u003cem\u003e (Baker Academic, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eEnglish professor David Lyle Jeffrey emphasizes the effect of “magnificent fruitfulness” that Scripture had upon the writings of English poets. Reason is not the only conduit of reality, Jeffrey observes, which is why God speaks so frequently through poetry in the Scriptures (and why John Donne can call him a “metaphorical God”). Beginning with medieval poetry, Jeffrey describes the surprising way Italian dramatic sermons, encouraged by St. Francis of Assisi, made the Gospel accessible to the imagination and later influenced English poets and Biblical translators. These dramatic sermons led to Gospel paraphrases which laid a foundation for translating Scripture into the vernacular, culminating in the incomparable King James Version. Accentuating the aural and oral nature of the English Scriptures, Jeffrey makes the case that beautiful poetic language is not only self-revelatory, but is also a stamp of authoritative divine revelation. \u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"phillips\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eChristopher Phillips\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“One of the things that I really found really exciting about this project was realizing how many things, not just people did with hymns, but how many things hymns enabled people to do and empowered them to do. To think that a creative mind as powerful as William Cowper, who would write everything from very witty rewrites of Horace and Pindar to scathing attacks on the evils of slavery to one of the most incisive descriptions of what depression fells like that a poet’s ever written. . . . He gets to it through what had been written off as this very conventional means.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Christopher Phillips, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Hymnal: A Reading History\u003cem\u003e (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eEnglish Professor Christopher N. Phillips discusses hymnals as physical artifacts and how these “lived-with books” have formed devotion at church, school, and home. While teaching through Susan Warner’s nineteenth-century novel \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Wide, Wide World,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e Philips noticed how hymnbooks kept appearing in the text. This led him to focus on the “subplot of the hymnbook” within the novel, and how it “traces a growth of the self.” Making application beyond the novel, Phillips highlights how physical things like hymnbooks are deeply formative, in fellowship with practices and rituals. Philips also explores how the poetic form of hymns — sometimes disparaged as conventional — actually  “enabled and empowered” some poets (such as Cowper, Frost, and Dickinson) toward original creative expression.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2020-12-24 12:15:37" } }
Volume 149

Guests on Volume 149

DRU JOHNSON on how rituals serve to shape our understanding of God and Creation
STEVEN L. PORTER on the causes and consequences of the loss of confidence in the rationality of morality
REINHARD HÜTTER on why Christian ethics must be ordered by Christian eschatology
MATTHEW LEVERING on the theological and philosophical concerns of Hans Urs von Balthasar
DAVID LYLE JEFFREY on the influence of the Bible on English poetry
CHRISTOPHER PHILLIPS on the cultural and spiritual effects of hymns and the “thingness” of hymnals

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume. 

Dru Johnson

Every good endeavor to understand the world contains a lot of ritual in it — and rituals where you don’t necessarily understand what you’re doing, or why you are doing them at first. . . . The idea that you should be able to understand it from the outset, before you set foot into any activity, is kind of absurd in all of life. So I don’t know why we think it would be any different if God is enjoining us through our bodies into his world, to see it properly.”

— Dru Johnson, author of Human Rites: The Power of Rituals, Habits, and Sacraments (Eerdmans, 2019)

Biblical scholar Dru Johnson highlights the unique way the Scriptures link ritual with epistemology; what we know is inextricable from what we do. Human life is inescapably ritualistic, he argues, even if rituals are spurned as inauthentic or superficial. Approaching ritual studies from a Hebrew Bible perspective, Johnson views ritual as the umbrella concept for liturgy and sacrament. In his experience, the ritual nature of daily life garners resistance from Christians who want the sacraments to be almost bizarrely special. But discerning the ritual nature of all life helps us to discern the sacramentality of all life — guided by the sacredness of a particular meal and bath. Like poetry and story, the sacraments are irreducible; they cannot be boiled down to propositional statements. We are to “theologize through performance” because as Johnson explains, “The body is not ‘second-tier’ in how we understand the world.”       

•     •     •

Steven L. Porter

To tolerate someone else’s opinion and to respect their opinion actually needs to be grounded in knowledge, in moral knowledge, because . . . [toleration] is a form of respect; it’s to give the other person the dignity to hold the view that they hold, and to be as sympathetic and understanding as we possibly can as to the reasons they hold that. So knowledge actually engenders a kind of humility, a kind of open-mindedness, an actual respect and ability to listen to the other side without immediately thinking of how I’m going to respond without even understanding their arguments.”

— Steven L. Porter, editor of The Disappearance of Moral Knowledge (Routledge, 2018)

Steven L. Porter discusses The Disappearance of Moral Knowledge, an unfinished manuscript (which he helped to complete) by the late philosopher Dallas Willard. The book traces how modern culture lost the assumption that ethical claims are matters of knowledge, which can be right or wrong. Without a basis in rationality, morality is confined to private opinion, pulled along by rhetoric and tribalism. While Willard held that this disappearance primarily resulted from sociological factors, nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophers did not help matters, as they failed to provide an adequate foundation to ground ethical theory. As Porter explains, Willard grounds moral knowledge conclusively in love — an embrace of the other. Ultimately, toleration and humility grow out of recovering moral knowledge, making space for respect and complexity in the mutual pursuit of what is right.         

•     •     •

Reinhard Hütter

In Thomas Aquinas, eschatology runs all the way through. . . . The eschaton describes the final end of humans with God. And the final end is, in a certain way, already thematized right at the beginning [of the Summa Theologiae]. . . . If Christian theology is not all the way shot through by eschatology, it’s not Christian theology. It’s something else. Christian theology is all the way eschatological . . . because it’s always a connection — in the encounter with Christ, it’s a connection, not only with God . . . but also an encounter with that end to which God has called humans.”

— Reinhard Hütter, author of Bound for Beatitude: A Thomistic Study in Eschatology and Ethics (Catholic University of America Press, 2019)

Theologian Reinhard Hütter argues that Christian theology must be oriented toward the beatific vision — eschatalogical “all the way through.” While many modern Christians anticipate an Edenic paradise as the ultimate telos, this parts from the Church’s tradition, which recognized that Adam and Eve were made for something beyond Paradise: for union with God Himself. Hütter sets forth Thomas Aquinas’s theology as a corrective to modern underreaching eschatology. From the beginning of the Summa Theologiae, Aquinas weaved in eschatology. He taught that each soul is directly created by God ex nihilo and that, therefore, the end of each soul is union with God. Despite the anti-human agendas of modernity, Hütter follows Aquinas and encourages that the transcendent will always break through, because the human soul is ordered to God and created for union with Him.        

•     •     •

Matthew Levering

“Balthasar believes that the credibility of Christianity ultimately rests on love. He has a book called Love Alone is Credible because Christ alone reveals the form of divine love. And so the ultimate apologetic for the truth of Christianity is love. . . . And Nietzsche is a factor because Nietzsche cuts through this rationalism of the day and insists upon the role of the will. Now Balthasar does not accept the will to power, but he argues repeatedly that truth — when you uncover truth, when you get to the bottom of it — you see that truth is the will to love, the divine will to love.”

— Matthew Levering, author of The Achievement of Hans Urs von Balthasar: An Introduction to His Trilogy (Catholic University of America Press, 2019)

Theologian Matthew Levering discusses how Hans Urs von Balthasar engaged with the philosophies of Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche in order to spread the Christian faith among intellectuals. Balthasar believed that Catholic Neo-scholastics had an overly negative response to Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche, shunning them as a "triad of heretics." Instead, Balthasar took these philosophers seriously, with a view towards apologetics. Responding to Nietzsche, for example, Balthasar rejected the overly propositional Christianity of Neo-scholasticism, arguing that truth does involve the will, as Nietzsche insisted, but not the will to power — rather the will to love. He held that self-surrender in love is the ground of all knowing, all beauty. For Hans Urs von Balthasar, as Levering explains, love is what makes Christianity credible.        

•     •     •

David Lyle Jeffrey

“John Donne is keenly aware that when God speaks most authoritatively concerning his people, from the prophets on, through to the end of the Scriptures, and Jesus as well — when he teaches something that’s authoritative, that is absolutely necessary for the disciples to know, he resorts to a form of poetry. When Donne calls the Lord a ‘metaphorical God,’ what he means is that God, when he reaches out to us because he desires that we understand Him, recognizes the need for poetry both to communicate -- but it also becomes the stamp of Him speaking.”

— David Lyle Jeffrey, author of Scripture and the English Poetic Tradition (Baker Academic, 2019)

English professor David Lyle Jeffrey emphasizes the effect of “magnificent fruitfulness” that Scripture had upon the writings of English poets. Reason is not the only conduit of reality, Jeffrey observes, which is why God speaks so frequently through poetry in the Scriptures (and why John Donne can call him a “metaphorical God”). Beginning with medieval poetry, Jeffrey describes the surprising way Italian dramatic sermons, encouraged by St. Francis of Assisi, made the Gospel accessible to the imagination and later influenced English poets and Biblical translators. These dramatic sermons led to Gospel paraphrases which laid a foundation for translating Scripture into the vernacular, culminating in the incomparable King James Version. Accentuating the aural and oral nature of the English Scriptures, Jeffrey makes the case that beautiful poetic language is not only self-revelatory, but is also a stamp of authoritative divine revelation.        

•     •     •

Christopher Phillips

“One of the things that I really found really exciting about this project was realizing how many things, not just people did with hymns, but how many things hymns enabled people to do and empowered them to do. To think that a creative mind as powerful as William Cowper, who would write everything from very witty rewrites of Horace and Pindar to scathing attacks on the evils of slavery to one of the most incisive descriptions of what depression fells like that a poet’s ever written. . . . He gets to it through what had been written off as this very conventional means.”

— Christopher Phillips, author of The Hymnal: A Reading History (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018)

English Professor Christopher N. Phillips discusses hymnals as physical artifacts and how these “lived-with books” have formed devotion at church, school, and home. While teaching through Susan Warner’s nineteenth-century novel The Wide, Wide World, Philips noticed how hymnbooks kept appearing in the text. This led him to focus on the “subplot of the hymnbook” within the novel, and how it “traces a growth of the self.” Making application beyond the novel, Phillips highlights how physical things like hymnbooks are deeply formative, in fellowship with practices and rituals. Philips also explores how the poetic form of hymns — sometimes disparaged as conventional — actually  “enabled and empowered” some poets (such as Cowper, Frost, and Dickinson) toward original creative expression.       

 

 

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SMITH\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how a modern “religion without God” characterizes what alleges to be \u003cstrong\u003esecular neutrality\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#vanderburg\"\u003eWILLEM VANDERBURG\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on the costs of forgetting the unity and \u003cstrong\u003einterdependence of Creation\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#bilbro\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJEFFREY BILBRO\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on lessons from \u003cstrong\u003eWendell Berry’s poetry, fiction, and essays\u003c\/strong\u003e about the virtues that characterize people who foster sustainable cultures\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mason\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eEMMA MASON\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the theological concerns evident in the \u003cstrong\u003epoetry of Christina Rossetti\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#milbank\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eALISON MILBANK\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003eGothic literary genre\u003c\/strong\u003e in England expressed ambivalence about the effects of the Reformation\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#larsen\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eTIMOTHY LARSEN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on \u003cstrong\u003eGeorge MacDonald\u003c\/strong\u003e and Victorian earnestness about faith and anxieties about doubt\u003cbr\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-148-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-148-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"smith\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eSteven D. Smith\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Paganism is a label you can use to refer to a kind of immanent religiosity or a view that there is something that’s sacred and holy, but it’s not transcendent — it’s not part of a different sphere of being or another world. It is immanent in this world. And I suggest that that in a sense is the natural condition of humanity. Unless there’s something that comes along to lift us out of that, that is sort of our natural assumption.”\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e— \u003cem\u003eSteven D. Smith, author of \u003c\/em\u003ePagans and Christians in the City: Culture Wars from the Tiber to the Potomac\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eLaw professor Steven D. Smith discusses the relationship between the sacred and the civic in his newest book \u003cem\u003ePagans and Christians in the City: Culture Wars from the Tiber to the Potomac.\u003c\/em\u003e Setting out to track the profound changes apparent in the modern world, Smith compares the paganism of the Roman Empire to the rise of a contemporary paganism which takes the form of a “religion without God.” For Smith, this differs radically from a transcendent religion which acknowledges an ultimate good beyond this universe. Right now, we are not witnessing so much a destruction of “the sacred” as such, but instead the rise of new orthodoxies, often centered on individual or national identity. Without the recognition that humans are inescapably religious creatures, the struggle to confront or solve our current public disputes will continue.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"vanderburg\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eWillem Vanderburg\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“About 100 years ago . . . we began to rearrange all human knowing and doing by means of disciplines. From the perspective of human history, that’s an extraordinarily strange way of arranging our knowing and doing. What we do with the discipline-based organization is, we say to the physicist, ‘Here, you study physical phenomena,’ . . . and to the sociologist, ‘Here, you study social phenomena,’ . . . In other words, we study human life and the world one category of phenomena at a time. And that has enormous limitation.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Willem Vanderburg, author of \u003c\/em\u003eSecular Nations Under New Gods: Christianity's Subversion by Technology and Politics\u003cem\u003e (University of Toronto Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eWillem H. Vanderburg, a former student of philosopher Jacques Ellul, argues for a vision of the world that better accounts for the complexity of life — both its individuality and its wholeness — than our current mechanistic, anti-human approach. Unlike machines, which can be quantified and mathematically represented, human life operates with an interconnectedness that cannot be so easily measured. Vanderburg emphasizes that we have rearranged human knowledge and action into narrow disciplines which purport to study life, but do so using\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003esingle\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecategories, an ordering which can work only in those fields where the focus on one category is useful, such as physics, biology, or chemistry. By reorganizing complex human methods of operation and communication into discipline-based silos which depend on the mechanical or technical domains, we have created a world of confusion where we understand life in the same terms as non-life. Vanderburg concludes that this subversion of a traditional Christian vision by modern technology poses a grave threat to our humanity.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"bilbro\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJeffrey Bilbro\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“So much of the cult of the artist today is about originality and making things new and coming up with the latest and greatest, but that’s really a symptom of a technological society — that we always have to have a new iteration of the gadget . . . Berry’s emphasis [is] on fidelity and sticking with things that might seem old and obsolete and worn out, and trying to be creative about how they might be renewed and made useful and new again. A renewal presupposes that something good has come earlier and that our task is not to create ‘ex nihilo’ — that’s God’s task — but to renew that which has been broken.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jeffrey Bilbro, author of \u003c\/em\u003eVirtues of Renewal: Wendell Berry's Sustainable Forms\u003cem\u003e (University Press of Kentucky, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eJeffrey Bilbro explores the importance of sustainability through the essays, poetry and fiction of Wendell Berry. He argues that Berry fosters a sense of propriety or fittingness, a manner in which we act in connection with the world around us. This theme is demonstrated by the example of a farmer who works with the land and within its limits, allowing the nature of the place to help form and correct the farmer’s initial vision. In opposition to this reciprocal way of farming, Berry describes much of contemporary agriculture, where the only value is how much can be produced, with no concern for the complexity of the relation of farmer to farm, leading inevitably to violent control of the relationship. Our current society has shifted into an economy that values an industrial mindset, focusing heavily on productivity. Bilbro defines this as the industrial grammar versus the agrarian grammar. He points out that the grammar of technology cannot heal, but only amplify the misdirected vision already in place. Bilbro hopes that we can, seeing through the eyes of Berry, come to recognize this reciprocity and, using a healthy imagination, make whole again those aspects of our lives that have been damaged.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mason\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eEmma Mason\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“What poetry does is almost push us into a position where we have to pay really close attention to words. It’s very difficult to read a poem quickly, and I think when we try to that’s often when people just get frustrated with it and say, ‘Oh, I don’t understand this,’ or ‘It feels inaccessible.’ Obviously, Rossetti works very hard to make her poetry quite accessible by using a very strong form, by using rhythm and by using rhyme. And it’s quite enjoyable to read.  But I think underneath those rhymes and really in the poem are these very deep and profound meanings and reflections that are both philosophical and theological. Poetry enables this layering of ideas and layering of our feelings about those ideas.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Emma Mason, author of \u003c\/em\u003eChristina Rossetti: Poetry, Ecology, Faith\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eProfessor Emma Mason explains how the Anglo-Catholic theological movement was integral to the faith of Christina Rossetti and helped shape her theological and philosophical convictions. The Oxford Movement within the Church of England, Mason explains, sought to return to a form that embraced the “supernatural” element then held in suspicion by many. Mason argues that important figures in this movement such as John Keble and John Henry Newman, drawing on a contemporary reclamation of the early Church fathers, turned to Romantic writers such as William Wordsworth and William Blake to find a way to rediscover the mystical in Anglicanism. Rossetti’s poetry reflects this attitude, exploring a deep connection to God through forms of rituals and practices that break free from a more rational, dualistic vision, drawing all things together through grace.         \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"milbank\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAlison Milbank\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e “I really do think that the ‘explained supernatural’ plays the 18th-century game of saying, ‘Yes, we have gotten beyond the past. We now live in an enlightened world.’ But then it begins to question that enlightenment. And I think that’s the point of the way that it works in Ann Radcliffe. And it’s also a Protestant mode which is partly about idolatry. I do think that there is a very Protestant form of Gothic whereby you show the deadness of the idol in order to point to the livingness of the true God.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Alison Milbank, author of \u003c\/em\u003eGod and the Gothic: Religion, Romance, and Reality in the English Literary Tradition\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTheologian Alison Milbank argues that nineteenth-century English Gothic literature grew out of the intuition of an uneasy relationship between the natural and supernatural following the English Reformation. The extreme rationalism of the nineteenth century led to a cultural ambivalence; belief in the narrative of historical progress conflicted with nostalgia for a past when structures and practices dealt with matters ghostly and divine. “The Catholic past is a site of desire as well as revulsion,” Milbank explains. “The Gothic seeks both to escape and harness its signifying power.” Haunted by that history, authors such as Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, and Bram Stoker explored the limits of materialism and grappled with the loss of a religious imaginary which could mediate the supernatural.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"larsen\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eTimothy Larsen\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Questioning is natural and inevitable. It’s how you get to a more mature Christian view. To not doubt something is to not think about it. So, MacDonald can see that this is just a maturation process. You were told about the Virgin Birth when you were 11, and now you’re 18 and you’re thinking about it again in a new way, and to think about it is to doubt it. That questioning, not in the kind of scoffing, accusatory way but just in the processing way, is part of life. It’s part of the Christian life.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Timothy Larsen, author of \u003c\/em\u003eGeorge MacDonald in the Age of Miracles: Incarnation, Doubt, and Reenchantment\u003cem\u003e (IVP Academic, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eHistorian Timothy Larsen situates George MacDonald within a Victorian understanding of faith and doubt. Faith, defined as “what you believe in your heart,” rose to an unprecedented value in the Victorian era, corresponding with a tendency toward unhealthy introspection and preoccupation with the problem of doubt. MacDonald held that these problems hinged upon understanding faith only in cerebral terms. He rejected a narrow Enlightenment view of faith, focusing instead upon trust in the person of Christ — specifically, the self-authenticating revelation of Christ in the Gospels. Larsen discusses how, like many Romantics, MacDonald worked toward the reenchantment of the world through the imagination, writing fairy tales as a medium to explore the meaning of reality.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-10-27T15:28:35-04:00","created_at":"2020-10-27T15:25:05-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["Alison Milbank","Christina Rossetti","Creation","Emma Mason","English Gothic Literature","George MacDonald","Jeffrey Bilbro","Secular neutrality","Steven D. Smith","Timothy Larsen","Virtue","Wendell Berry","Willem Vanderburg"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":33175108157503,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-148-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 148","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-148.jpg?v=1609794809","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Smith_Pagans_Christians.jpg?v=1609794809","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Vanderburg_SecularNations.jpg?v=1609794809","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bilbro_VirtuesofRenewal.jpg?v=1609794809","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Mason_ChristinaRossetti.jpg?v=1609794809","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Milbank_God_theGothic.jpg?v=1609794809","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Larsen_GeorgeMacDonaldandMiracles.jpg?v=1609794809"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-148.jpg?v=1609794809","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7998379098175,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-148.jpg?v=1609794809"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-148.jpg?v=1609794809","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":7997909532735,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":499,"width":334,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Smith_Pagans_Christians.jpg?v=1609794809"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Smith_Pagans_Christians.jpg?v=1609794809","width":334},{"alt":null,"id":7997909565503,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"width":333,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Vanderburg_SecularNations.jpg?v=1609794809"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":499,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Vanderburg_SecularNations.jpg?v=1609794809","width":333},{"alt":null,"id":7997909925951,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":600,"width":400,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bilbro_VirtuesofRenewal.jpg?v=1609794809"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":600,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bilbro_VirtuesofRenewal.jpg?v=1609794809","width":400},{"alt":null,"id":7997909631039,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.655,"height":550,"width":360,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Mason_ChristinaRossetti.jpg?v=1609794809"},"aspect_ratio":0.655,"height":550,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Mason_ChristinaRossetti.jpg?v=1609794809","width":360},{"alt":null,"id":7997909598271,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.662,"height":550,"width":364,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Milbank_God_theGothic.jpg?v=1609794809"},"aspect_ratio":0.662,"height":550,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Milbank_God_theGothic.jpg?v=1609794809","width":364},{"alt":null,"id":7997910319167,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":550,"width":367,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Larsen_GeorgeMacDonaldandMiracles.jpg?v=1609794809"},"aspect_ratio":0.667,"height":550,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Larsen_GeorgeMacDonaldandMiracles.jpg?v=1609794809","width":367}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 148\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#smith\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSTEVEN D. SMITH\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how a modern “religion without God” characterizes what alleges to be \u003cstrong\u003esecular neutrality\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#vanderburg\"\u003eWILLEM VANDERBURG\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on the costs of forgetting the unity and \u003cstrong\u003einterdependence of Creation\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#bilbro\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJEFFREY BILBRO\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on lessons from \u003cstrong\u003eWendell Berry’s poetry, fiction, and essays\u003c\/strong\u003e about the virtues that characterize people who foster sustainable cultures\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mason\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eEMMA MASON\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the theological concerns evident in the \u003cstrong\u003epoetry of Christina Rossetti\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#milbank\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eALISON MILBANK\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003eGothic literary genre\u003c\/strong\u003e in England expressed ambivalence about the effects of the Reformation\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#larsen\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eTIMOTHY LARSEN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on \u003cstrong\u003eGeorge MacDonald\u003c\/strong\u003e and Victorian earnestness about faith and anxieties about doubt\u003cbr\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-148-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-148-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"smith\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eSteven D. Smith\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Paganism is a label you can use to refer to a kind of immanent religiosity or a view that there is something that’s sacred and holy, but it’s not transcendent — it’s not part of a different sphere of being or another world. It is immanent in this world. And I suggest that that in a sense is the natural condition of humanity. Unless there’s something that comes along to lift us out of that, that is sort of our natural assumption.”\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e— \u003cem\u003eSteven D. Smith, author of \u003c\/em\u003ePagans and Christians in the City: Culture Wars from the Tiber to the Potomac\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eLaw professor Steven D. Smith discusses the relationship between the sacred and the civic in his newest book \u003cem\u003ePagans and Christians in the City: Culture Wars from the Tiber to the Potomac.\u003c\/em\u003e Setting out to track the profound changes apparent in the modern world, Smith compares the paganism of the Roman Empire to the rise of a contemporary paganism which takes the form of a “religion without God.” For Smith, this differs radically from a transcendent religion which acknowledges an ultimate good beyond this universe. Right now, we are not witnessing so much a destruction of “the sacred” as such, but instead the rise of new orthodoxies, often centered on individual or national identity. Without the recognition that humans are inescapably religious creatures, the struggle to confront or solve our current public disputes will continue.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"vanderburg\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eWillem Vanderburg\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“About 100 years ago . . . we began to rearrange all human knowing and doing by means of disciplines. From the perspective of human history, that’s an extraordinarily strange way of arranging our knowing and doing. What we do with the discipline-based organization is, we say to the physicist, ‘Here, you study physical phenomena,’ . . . and to the sociologist, ‘Here, you study social phenomena,’ . . . In other words, we study human life and the world one category of phenomena at a time. And that has enormous limitation.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Willem Vanderburg, author of \u003c\/em\u003eSecular Nations Under New Gods: Christianity's Subversion by Technology and Politics\u003cem\u003e (University of Toronto Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eWillem H. Vanderburg, a former student of philosopher Jacques Ellul, argues for a vision of the world that better accounts for the complexity of life — both its individuality and its wholeness — than our current mechanistic, anti-human approach. Unlike machines, which can be quantified and mathematically represented, human life operates with an interconnectedness that cannot be so easily measured. Vanderburg emphasizes that we have rearranged human knowledge and action into narrow disciplines which purport to study life, but do so using\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003esingle\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ecategories, an ordering which can work only in those fields where the focus on one category is useful, such as physics, biology, or chemistry. By reorganizing complex human methods of operation and communication into discipline-based silos which depend on the mechanical or technical domains, we have created a world of confusion where we understand life in the same terms as non-life. Vanderburg concludes that this subversion of a traditional Christian vision by modern technology poses a grave threat to our humanity.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"bilbro\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJeffrey Bilbro\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“So much of the cult of the artist today is about originality and making things new and coming up with the latest and greatest, but that’s really a symptom of a technological society — that we always have to have a new iteration of the gadget . . . Berry’s emphasis [is] on fidelity and sticking with things that might seem old and obsolete and worn out, and trying to be creative about how they might be renewed and made useful and new again. A renewal presupposes that something good has come earlier and that our task is not to create ‘ex nihilo’ — that’s God’s task — but to renew that which has been broken.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jeffrey Bilbro, author of \u003c\/em\u003eVirtues of Renewal: Wendell Berry's Sustainable Forms\u003cem\u003e (University Press of Kentucky, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eJeffrey Bilbro explores the importance of sustainability through the essays, poetry and fiction of Wendell Berry. He argues that Berry fosters a sense of propriety or fittingness, a manner in which we act in connection with the world around us. This theme is demonstrated by the example of a farmer who works with the land and within its limits, allowing the nature of the place to help form and correct the farmer’s initial vision. In opposition to this reciprocal way of farming, Berry describes much of contemporary agriculture, where the only value is how much can be produced, with no concern for the complexity of the relation of farmer to farm, leading inevitably to violent control of the relationship. Our current society has shifted into an economy that values an industrial mindset, focusing heavily on productivity. Bilbro defines this as the industrial grammar versus the agrarian grammar. He points out that the grammar of technology cannot heal, but only amplify the misdirected vision already in place. Bilbro hopes that we can, seeing through the eyes of Berry, come to recognize this reciprocity and, using a healthy imagination, make whole again those aspects of our lives that have been damaged.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mason\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eEmma Mason\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“What poetry does is almost push us into a position where we have to pay really close attention to words. It’s very difficult to read a poem quickly, and I think when we try to that’s often when people just get frustrated with it and say, ‘Oh, I don’t understand this,’ or ‘It feels inaccessible.’ Obviously, Rossetti works very hard to make her poetry quite accessible by using a very strong form, by using rhythm and by using rhyme. And it’s quite enjoyable to read.  But I think underneath those rhymes and really in the poem are these very deep and profound meanings and reflections that are both philosophical and theological. Poetry enables this layering of ideas and layering of our feelings about those ideas.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Emma Mason, author of \u003c\/em\u003eChristina Rossetti: Poetry, Ecology, Faith\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eProfessor Emma Mason explains how the Anglo-Catholic theological movement was integral to the faith of Christina Rossetti and helped shape her theological and philosophical convictions. The Oxford Movement within the Church of England, Mason explains, sought to return to a form that embraced the “supernatural” element then held in suspicion by many. Mason argues that important figures in this movement such as John Keble and John Henry Newman, drawing on a contemporary reclamation of the early Church fathers, turned to Romantic writers such as William Wordsworth and William Blake to find a way to rediscover the mystical in Anglicanism. Rossetti’s poetry reflects this attitude, exploring a deep connection to God through forms of rituals and practices that break free from a more rational, dualistic vision, drawing all things together through grace.         \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"milbank\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAlison Milbank\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e “I really do think that the ‘explained supernatural’ plays the 18th-century game of saying, ‘Yes, we have gotten beyond the past. We now live in an enlightened world.’ But then it begins to question that enlightenment. And I think that’s the point of the way that it works in Ann Radcliffe. And it’s also a Protestant mode which is partly about idolatry. I do think that there is a very Protestant form of Gothic whereby you show the deadness of the idol in order to point to the livingness of the true God.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Alison Milbank, author of \u003c\/em\u003eGod and the Gothic: Religion, Romance, and Reality in the English Literary Tradition\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTheologian Alison Milbank argues that nineteenth-century English Gothic literature grew out of the intuition of an uneasy relationship between the natural and supernatural following the English Reformation. The extreme rationalism of the nineteenth century led to a cultural ambivalence; belief in the narrative of historical progress conflicted with nostalgia for a past when structures and practices dealt with matters ghostly and divine. “The Catholic past is a site of desire as well as revulsion,” Milbank explains. “The Gothic seeks both to escape and harness its signifying power.” Haunted by that history, authors such as Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, and Bram Stoker explored the limits of materialism and grappled with the loss of a religious imaginary which could mediate the supernatural.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"larsen\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\" data-mce-style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eTimothy Larsen\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Questioning is natural and inevitable. It’s how you get to a more mature Christian view. To not doubt something is to not think about it. So, MacDonald can see that this is just a maturation process. You were told about the Virgin Birth when you were 11, and now you’re 18 and you’re thinking about it again in a new way, and to think about it is to doubt it. That questioning, not in the kind of scoffing, accusatory way but just in the processing way, is part of life. It’s part of the Christian life.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Timothy Larsen, author of \u003c\/em\u003eGeorge MacDonald in the Age of Miracles: Incarnation, Doubt, and Reenchantment\u003cem\u003e (IVP Academic, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eHistorian Timothy Larsen situates George MacDonald within a Victorian understanding of faith and doubt. Faith, defined as “what you believe in your heart,” rose to an unprecedented value in the Victorian era, corresponding with a tendency toward unhealthy introspection and preoccupation with the problem of doubt. MacDonald held that these problems hinged upon understanding faith only in cerebral terms. He rejected a narrow Enlightenment view of faith, focusing instead upon trust in the person of Christ — specifically, the self-authenticating revelation of Christ in the Gospels. Larsen discusses how, like many Romantics, MacDonald worked toward the reenchantment of the world through the imagination, writing fairy tales as a medium to explore the meaning of reality.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2020-09-16 12:15:37" } }
Volume 148

Guests on Volume 148

STEVEN D. SMITH on how a modern “religion without God” characterizes what alleges to be secular neutrality
WILLEM VANDERBURG on the costs of forgetting the unity and interdependence of Creation
JEFFREY BILBRO on lessons from Wendell Berry’s poetry, fiction, and essays about the virtues that characterize people who foster sustainable cultures
EMMA MASON on the theological concerns evident in the poetry of Christina Rossetti
ALISON MILBANK on how the Gothic literary genre in England expressed ambivalence about the effects of the Reformation
TIMOTHY LARSEN on George MacDonald and Victorian earnestness about faith and anxieties about doubt

This Volume is also available on CD

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.

Steven D. Smith

“Paganism is a label you can use to refer to a kind of immanent religiosity or a view that there is something that’s sacred and holy, but it’s not transcendent — it’s not part of a different sphere of being or another world. It is immanent in this world. And I suggest that that in a sense is the natural condition of humanity. Unless there’s something that comes along to lift us out of that, that is sort of our natural assumption.”

— Steven D. Smith, author of Pagans and Christians in the City: Culture Wars from the Tiber to the Potomac (Eerdmans, 2018)

Law professor Steven D. Smith discusses the relationship between the sacred and the civic in his newest book Pagans and Christians in the City: Culture Wars from the Tiber to the Potomac. Setting out to track the profound changes apparent in the modern world, Smith compares the paganism of the Roman Empire to the rise of a contemporary paganism which takes the form of a “religion without God.” For Smith, this differs radically from a transcendent religion which acknowledges an ultimate good beyond this universe. Right now, we are not witnessing so much a destruction of “the sacred” as such, but instead the rise of new orthodoxies, often centered on individual or national identity. Without the recognition that humans are inescapably religious creatures, the struggle to confront or solve our current public disputes will continue.       

•     •     •

Willem Vanderburg

“About 100 years ago . . . we began to rearrange all human knowing and doing by means of disciplines. From the perspective of human history, that’s an extraordinarily strange way of arranging our knowing and doing. What we do with the discipline-based organization is, we say to the physicist, ‘Here, you study physical phenomena,’ . . . and to the sociologist, ‘Here, you study social phenomena,’ . . . In other words, we study human life and the world one category of phenomena at a time. And that has enormous limitation.”

— Willem Vanderburg, author of Secular Nations Under New Gods: Christianity's Subversion by Technology and Politics (University of Toronto Press, 2018)

Willem H. Vanderburg, a former student of philosopher Jacques Ellul, argues for a vision of the world that better accounts for the complexity of life — both its individuality and its wholeness — than our current mechanistic, anti-human approach. Unlike machines, which can be quantified and mathematically represented, human life operates with an interconnectedness that cannot be so easily measured. Vanderburg emphasizes that we have rearranged human knowledge and action into narrow disciplines which purport to study life, but do so using single categories, an ordering which can work only in those fields where the focus on one category is useful, such as physics, biology, or chemistry. By reorganizing complex human methods of operation and communication into discipline-based silos which depend on the mechanical or technical domains, we have created a world of confusion where we understand life in the same terms as non-life. Vanderburg concludes that this subversion of a traditional Christian vision by modern technology poses a grave threat to our humanity.       

•     •     •

Jeffrey Bilbro

“So much of the cult of the artist today is about originality and making things new and coming up with the latest and greatest, but that’s really a symptom of a technological society — that we always have to have a new iteration of the gadget . . . Berry’s emphasis [is] on fidelity and sticking with things that might seem old and obsolete and worn out, and trying to be creative about how they might be renewed and made useful and new again. A renewal presupposes that something good has come earlier and that our task is not to create ‘ex nihilo’ — that’s God’s task — but to renew that which has been broken.”

— Jeffrey Bilbro, author of Virtues of Renewal: Wendell Berry's Sustainable Forms (University Press of Kentucky, 2019)

Jeffrey Bilbro explores the importance of sustainability through the essays, poetry and fiction of Wendell Berry. He argues that Berry fosters a sense of propriety or fittingness, a manner in which we act in connection with the world around us. This theme is demonstrated by the example of a farmer who works with the land and within its limits, allowing the nature of the place to help form and correct the farmer’s initial vision. In opposition to this reciprocal way of farming, Berry describes much of contemporary agriculture, where the only value is how much can be produced, with no concern for the complexity of the relation of farmer to farm, leading inevitably to violent control of the relationship. Our current society has shifted into an economy that values an industrial mindset, focusing heavily on productivity. Bilbro defines this as the industrial grammar versus the agrarian grammar. He points out that the grammar of technology cannot heal, but only amplify the misdirected vision already in place. Bilbro hopes that we can, seeing through the eyes of Berry, come to recognize this reciprocity and, using a healthy imagination, make whole again those aspects of our lives that have been damaged.       

•     •     •

Emma Mason

“What poetry does is almost push us into a position where we have to pay really close attention to words. It’s very difficult to read a poem quickly, and I think when we try to that’s often when people just get frustrated with it and say, ‘Oh, I don’t understand this,’ or ‘It feels inaccessible.’ Obviously, Rossetti works very hard to make her poetry quite accessible by using a very strong form, by using rhythm and by using rhyme. And it’s quite enjoyable to read.  But I think underneath those rhymes and really in the poem are these very deep and profound meanings and reflections that are both philosophical and theological. Poetry enables this layering of ideas and layering of our feelings about those ideas.”

— Emma Mason, author of Christina Rossetti: Poetry, Ecology, Faith (Oxford University Press, 2018)

Professor Emma Mason explains how the Anglo-Catholic theological movement was integral to the faith of Christina Rossetti and helped shape her theological and philosophical convictions. The Oxford Movement within the Church of England, Mason explains, sought to return to a form that embraced the “supernatural” element then held in suspicion by many. Mason argues that important figures in this movement such as John Keble and John Henry Newman, drawing on a contemporary reclamation of the early Church fathers, turned to Romantic writers such as William Wordsworth and William Blake to find a way to rediscover the mystical in Anglicanism. Rossetti’s poetry reflects this attitude, exploring a deep connection to God through forms of rituals and practices that break free from a more rational, dualistic vision, drawing all things together through grace.        

•     •     •

Alison Milbank

“I really do think that the ‘explained supernatural’ plays the 18th-century game of saying, ‘Yes, we have gotten beyond the past. We now live in an enlightened world.’ But then it begins to question that enlightenment. And I think that’s the point of the way that it works in Ann Radcliffe. And it’s also a Protestant mode which is partly about idolatry. I do think that there is a very Protestant form of Gothic whereby you show the deadness of the idol in order to point to the livingness of the true God.”

— Alison Milbank, author of God and the Gothic: Religion, Romance, and Reality in the English Literary Tradition (Oxford University Press, 2018)

Theologian Alison Milbank argues that nineteenth-century English Gothic literature grew out of the intuition of an uneasy relationship between the natural and supernatural following the English Reformation. The extreme rationalism of the nineteenth century led to a cultural ambivalence; belief in the narrative of historical progress conflicted with nostalgia for a past when structures and practices dealt with matters ghostly and divine. “The Catholic past is a site of desire as well as revulsion,” Milbank explains. “The Gothic seeks both to escape and harness its signifying power.” Haunted by that history, authors such as Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, and Bram Stoker explored the limits of materialism and grappled with the loss of a religious imaginary which could mediate the supernatural.       

•     •     •

Timothy Larsen

“Questioning is natural and inevitable. It’s how you get to a more mature Christian view. To not doubt something is to not think about it. So, MacDonald can see that this is just a maturation process. You were told about the Virgin Birth when you were 11, and now you’re 18 and you’re thinking about it again in a new way, and to think about it is to doubt it. That questioning, not in the kind of scoffing, accusatory way but just in the processing way, is part of life. It’s part of the Christian life.”

— Timothy Larsen, author of George MacDonald in the Age of Miracles: Incarnation, Doubt, and Reenchantment (IVP Academic, 2018)


Historian Timothy Larsen situates George MacDonald within a Victorian understanding of faith and doubt. Faith, defined as “what you believe in your heart,” rose to an unprecedented value in the Victorian era, corresponding with a tendency toward unhealthy introspection and preoccupation with the problem of doubt. MacDonald held that these problems hinged upon understanding faith only in cerebral terms. He rejected a narrow Enlightenment view of faith, focusing instead upon trust in the person of Christ — specifically, the self-authenticating revelation of Christ in the Gospels. Larsen discusses how, like many Romantics, MacDonald worked toward the reenchantment of the world through the imagination, writing fairy tales as a medium to explore the meaning of reality.       


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{ "product": {"id":4668942483519,"title":"Volume 147","handle":"mh-147-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 147\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#staudt\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eR. JARED STAUDT\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the tradition of \u003cstrong\u003ebrewing beer\u003c\/strong\u003e in monastic and Christian culture\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#peters\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJASON PETERS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on defining \u003cstrong\u003elocalism,\u003c\/strong\u003e dealing with discontent and imperfection, and appreciating \u003cstrong\u003enostalgia\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#schindler\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eD. C. SCHINDLER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the classical and Christian understanding of the \u003cstrong\u003eTranscendentals\u003c\/strong\u003e and why they matter now\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#gay\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCRAIG GAY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on why we need a theology of \u003cstrong\u003epersonhood\u003c\/strong\u003e in response to challenges posed by \u003cstrong\u003etechnology\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hirschfeld\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMARY HIRSCHFELD\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on comparing contemporary economics with \u003cstrong\u003eeconomics\u003c\/strong\u003e as understood by \u003cstrong\u003eThomas Aquinas\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#samway\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePATRICK SAMWAY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the publishing relationship between \u003cstrong\u003eFlannery O’Connor\u003c\/strong\u003e and\u003cstrong\u003e Robert Giroux\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-147-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-147-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"staudt\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cspan\u003eR. Jared Staudt\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“What I’m trying to do in the book is to call people to rethink their lives. How does everything fit together? Is our faith really the center that integrates everything else?”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— R. Jared Staudt, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Beer Option: Brewing a Catholic Culture Yesterday and Today\u003cem\u003e (Angelico Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eDominican oblate R. Jared Staudt wants to call attention to the cultural influence of the monastic tradition of brewing beer. Benedictine monasteries have themselves been recovering a lost tradition of craft brewing and Staudt’s book reminds Christians that brewing beer, among other practices, is part of what has shaped a way of life for Christians through many centuries. Beer traditionally served as part of one’s subsistence and now encourages local virtues such as building community, providing employment, and participating in local economies. Closely linked not only with festivities, but with the Benedictine theme of hospitality, sharing local beers with one’s friends and neighbors is just one way of integrating all of life into Christian faith and practice.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"peters\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJason Peters\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“We are habituated to the world long before we’re conscious of it. And then we find that we’re implicated in things that we would rather not be implicated in. And that’s a fact of existence; that’s a fact of the world as we find it. I think the honest thing is to own up to that and then to go about the modest but difficult task of shaking what has to be shaken.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jason Peters, editor of \u003c\/em\u003eLocalism in the Mass Age: A Front Porch Republic Manifesto\u003cem\u003e (Cascade Books, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eEnglish professor Jason Peters discusses the challenges of thinking about localism. While “localism” is a concept that has gained much ground in recent years, there is still the danger of it being a movement united around discontent over the current states of affairs, rather than around constructive or substantive principles. One way of overcoming this hurdle is by recognizing the various ways in which we are all implicated in “things as they are” whether we like it or not. A commitment to localism, says Peters, requires both honesty and modesty with regards to life as we find it. But such a recognition does not open the door to cynicism. Rather, it is a call to “get busy.” To be honest about our own embeddedness in the imperfections of life also protects a sense of home and even nostalgia for a lost home.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"schindler\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eD. C. Schindler\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“The idea in this book in a way is to try to bring back a sense of the ontological depth of love. It’s certainly not a mere chemical reaction in the brain, but nor is it a mere emotion. It’s not even simply wishing others well, a kind of good will. It includes all those kinds of things in their proper place, but it’s ultimately I think the meaning of reality.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— D. C. Schindler, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eLove and the Postmodern Predicament: Rediscovering the Real in Beauty, Goodness, and Truth\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Cascade Books, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003ePhilosopher D. C. Schindler examines how postmodernism poses a unique threat to our sense of an interior self. Schindler argues that the postmodern predicament requires a recovery of reality, which would be more easily achieved through a recovery of the classical and Christian understanding of the Transcendentals: Truth, Goodness, Beauty. Of key importance to this task is a renewed understanding of how Love and Beauty are connected and their capacity to unite us to what is really real.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"gay\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eCraig Gay\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cmeta charset=\"utf-8\"\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“What we need is a robust theology of personhood. And what I’m trying to remind people of is that ‘hey, if we’re Christians, we have one! And we need to remember it.’ It’s there and it’s rich and it’s full and it’s been developed over many centuries by all kinds of really interesting, intelligent people. And this is something that we for a variety of reasons seem to have forgotten, but now it’s time to remember it, because it’s only as we remember this theology of personhood that we stand any chance of answering the kinds of questions that are being put to us today about technology and our use of it.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Craig Gay, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eModern Technology and the Human Future: A Christian Appraisal\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (InterVarsity Press, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eSociologist Craig Gay argues that in order to address the challenges of a technological approach to the world, we need to recover the Christian tradition’s robust theology of personhood. Advocates for technological progress often point out how adaptable humans are, but Gay wants to push back, asking why it is that humans need to adapt to technology rather than the other way around. Simply having the ability to adapt does not mean that it is in our best interests to do so or that we ought to do so. Without asking the basic questions about the kinds of people we are or what we ought to become, we will be powerless to address the pressures imposed upon us by technological opportunities.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hirschfeld\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMary Hirschfeld\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cmeta charset=\"utf-8\"\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“My ‘self-concern,’ among other things, includes other people for Aquinas much more naturally than would an economist’s conception of it. But also my self-concern is about developing community, supporting my family, and developing my character, right, developing virtue. And if those are my ultimate concerns, however that looks in my particular life, [then] the material goods that are used to sustain that life are instrumental goods and because they’re instrumental goods, for Aquinas, our desire for them is finite.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Mary Hirschfeld, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eAquinas and the Market: Toward a Human Economy\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Harvard University Press, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eEconomist and theologian Mary Hirschfeld compares how modern economists think about the human person compared to Thomas Aquinas’s understanding of personhood with regards to property and material wealth. While it may be unintentional, Hirschfeld argues that modern economics makes some fundamental assumptions about personhood, material goods, and God that prevent the discipline from developing a truly human understanding of economic life. To correct this error takes some honest rethinking of the discipline (with many clarifications along the way).        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"samway\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003ePatrick Samway\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cmeta charset=\"utf-8\"\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“We tend to think of a writer writing somehow in a cabin in the woods and it’s so beautiful. But as a matter of fact, these writers all have a lot of problems. And I thought it would be interesting to write about Flannery and her relationship with her editor. What I’m really writing about is the interstices. You know, the in-between times. What she was doing and what he was doing and how they collaborated.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Patrick Samway, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eFlannery O'Connor and Robert Giroux: A Publishing Partnership\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (University of Notre Dame Press, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eBiographer and priest Patrick Samway talks about the relationship between fiction writer Flannery O’Connor and the legendary editor Robert Giroux. Samway’s direct link with Robert Giroux through their lasting friendship brings to the conversation several intimate accounts about the relationship between these two literary figures as well as their personal stories.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-06-23T13:57:03-04:00","created_at":"2020-06-23T14:14:49-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["Beer brewing","Craig Gay","D. C. Schindler","Economics","Flannery O'Connor","Jason Peters","Localism","Mary Hirshfeld","Monastic Culture","Patrick Samway","Personhood","R. Jared Staudt","Robert Giroux","Technology","The Transcendentals","Thomas Aquinas"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":32626725421119,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-147-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 147","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-147.jpg?v=1605033450","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Staudt.png?v=1605033450","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Peters.png?v=1605033450","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Schindler.png?v=1605033450","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Gay.png?v=1605033450","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hirschfeld.png?v=1605033450","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Samway.png?v=1605033450"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-147.jpg?v=1605033450","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7798025257023,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-147.jpg?v=1605033450"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-147.jpg?v=1605033450","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":7292574236735,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.658,"height":552,"width":363,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Staudt.png?v=1605033450"},"aspect_ratio":0.658,"height":552,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Staudt.png?v=1605033450","width":363},{"alt":null,"id":7292574105663,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.679,"height":520,"width":353,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Peters.png?v=1605033450"},"aspect_ratio":0.679,"height":520,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Peters.png?v=1605033450","width":353},{"alt":null,"id":7292574203967,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.677,"height":536,"width":363,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Schindler.png?v=1605033450"},"aspect_ratio":0.677,"height":536,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Schindler.png?v=1605033450","width":363},{"alt":null,"id":7292574040127,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.677,"height":536,"width":363,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Gay.png?v=1605033450"},"aspect_ratio":0.677,"height":536,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Gay.png?v=1605033450","width":363},{"alt":null,"id":7292574072895,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.67,"height":542,"width":363,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hirschfeld.png?v=1605033450"},"aspect_ratio":0.67,"height":542,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hirschfeld.png?v=1605033450","width":363},{"alt":null,"id":7292574138431,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.677,"height":536,"width":363,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Samway.png?v=1605033450"},"aspect_ratio":0.677,"height":536,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Samway.png?v=1605033450","width":363}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 147\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#staudt\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eR. JARED STAUDT\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the tradition of \u003cstrong\u003ebrewing beer\u003c\/strong\u003e in monastic and Christian culture\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#peters\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJASON PETERS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on defining \u003cstrong\u003elocalism,\u003c\/strong\u003e dealing with discontent and imperfection, and appreciating \u003cstrong\u003enostalgia\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#schindler\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eD. C. SCHINDLER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the classical and Christian understanding of the \u003cstrong\u003eTranscendentals\u003c\/strong\u003e and why they matter now\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#gay\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCRAIG GAY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on why we need a theology of \u003cstrong\u003epersonhood\u003c\/strong\u003e in response to challenges posed by \u003cstrong\u003etechnology\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hirschfeld\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMARY HIRSCHFELD\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on comparing contemporary economics with \u003cstrong\u003eeconomics\u003c\/strong\u003e as understood by \u003cstrong\u003eThomas Aquinas\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#samway\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePATRICK SAMWAY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the publishing relationship between \u003cstrong\u003eFlannery O’Connor\u003c\/strong\u003e and\u003cstrong\u003e Robert Giroux\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-147-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-147-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"staudt\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cspan\u003eR. Jared Staudt\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“What I’m trying to do in the book is to call people to rethink their lives. How does everything fit together? Is our faith really the center that integrates everything else?”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— R. Jared Staudt, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Beer Option: Brewing a Catholic Culture Yesterday and Today\u003cem\u003e (Angelico Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eDominican oblate R. Jared Staudt wants to call attention to the cultural influence of the monastic tradition of brewing beer. Benedictine monasteries have themselves been recovering a lost tradition of craft brewing and Staudt’s book reminds Christians that brewing beer, among other practices, is part of what has shaped a way of life for Christians through many centuries. Beer traditionally served as part of one’s subsistence and now encourages local virtues such as building community, providing employment, and participating in local economies. Closely linked not only with festivities, but with the Benedictine theme of hospitality, sharing local beers with one’s friends and neighbors is just one way of integrating all of life into Christian faith and practice.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"peters\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJason Peters\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“We are habituated to the world long before we’re conscious of it. And then we find that we’re implicated in things that we would rather not be implicated in. And that’s a fact of existence; that’s a fact of the world as we find it. I think the honest thing is to own up to that and then to go about the modest but difficult task of shaking what has to be shaken.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jason Peters, editor of \u003c\/em\u003eLocalism in the Mass Age: A Front Porch Republic Manifesto\u003cem\u003e (Cascade Books, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eEnglish professor Jason Peters discusses the challenges of thinking about localism. While “localism” is a concept that has gained much ground in recent years, there is still the danger of it being a movement united around discontent over the current states of affairs, rather than around constructive or substantive principles. One way of overcoming this hurdle is by recognizing the various ways in which we are all implicated in “things as they are” whether we like it or not. A commitment to localism, says Peters, requires both honesty and modesty with regards to life as we find it. But such a recognition does not open the door to cynicism. Rather, it is a call to “get busy.” To be honest about our own embeddedness in the imperfections of life also protects a sense of home and even nostalgia for a lost home.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"schindler\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eD. C. Schindler\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“The idea in this book in a way is to try to bring back a sense of the ontological depth of love. It’s certainly not a mere chemical reaction in the brain, but nor is it a mere emotion. It’s not even simply wishing others well, a kind of good will. It includes all those kinds of things in their proper place, but it’s ultimately I think the meaning of reality.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— D. C. Schindler, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eLove and the Postmodern Predicament: Rediscovering the Real in Beauty, Goodness, and Truth\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Cascade Books, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003ePhilosopher D. C. Schindler examines how postmodernism poses a unique threat to our sense of an interior self. Schindler argues that the postmodern predicament requires a recovery of reality, which would be more easily achieved through a recovery of the classical and Christian understanding of the Transcendentals: Truth, Goodness, Beauty. Of key importance to this task is a renewed understanding of how Love and Beauty are connected and their capacity to unite us to what is really real.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"gay\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eCraig Gay\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cmeta charset=\"utf-8\"\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“What we need is a robust theology of personhood. And what I’m trying to remind people of is that ‘hey, if we’re Christians, we have one! And we need to remember it.’ It’s there and it’s rich and it’s full and it’s been developed over many centuries by all kinds of really interesting, intelligent people. And this is something that we for a variety of reasons seem to have forgotten, but now it’s time to remember it, because it’s only as we remember this theology of personhood that we stand any chance of answering the kinds of questions that are being put to us today about technology and our use of it.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Craig Gay, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eModern Technology and the Human Future: A Christian Appraisal\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (InterVarsity Press, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eSociologist Craig Gay argues that in order to address the challenges of a technological approach to the world, we need to recover the Christian tradition’s robust theology of personhood. Advocates for technological progress often point out how adaptable humans are, but Gay wants to push back, asking why it is that humans need to adapt to technology rather than the other way around. Simply having the ability to adapt does not mean that it is in our best interests to do so or that we ought to do so. Without asking the basic questions about the kinds of people we are or what we ought to become, we will be powerless to address the pressures imposed upon us by technological opportunities.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hirschfeld\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMary Hirschfeld\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cmeta charset=\"utf-8\"\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“My ‘self-concern,’ among other things, includes other people for Aquinas much more naturally than would an economist’s conception of it. But also my self-concern is about developing community, supporting my family, and developing my character, right, developing virtue. And if those are my ultimate concerns, however that looks in my particular life, [then] the material goods that are used to sustain that life are instrumental goods and because they’re instrumental goods, for Aquinas, our desire for them is finite.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Mary Hirschfeld, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eAquinas and the Market: Toward a Human Economy\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Harvard University Press, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eEconomist and theologian Mary Hirschfeld compares how modern economists think about the human person compared to Thomas Aquinas’s understanding of personhood with regards to property and material wealth. While it may be unintentional, Hirschfeld argues that modern economics makes some fundamental assumptions about personhood, material goods, and God that prevent the discipline from developing a truly human understanding of economic life. To correct this error takes some honest rethinking of the discipline (with many clarifications along the way).        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"samway\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003ePatrick Samway\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cmeta charset=\"utf-8\"\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“We tend to think of a writer writing somehow in a cabin in the woods and it’s so beautiful. But as a matter of fact, these writers all have a lot of problems. And I thought it would be interesting to write about Flannery and her relationship with her editor. What I’m really writing about is the interstices. You know, the in-between times. What she was doing and what he was doing and how they collaborated.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Patrick Samway, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eFlannery O'Connor and Robert Giroux: A Publishing Partnership\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (University of Notre Dame Press, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eBiographer and priest Patrick Samway talks about the relationship between fiction writer Flannery O’Connor and the legendary editor Robert Giroux. Samway’s direct link with Robert Giroux through their lasting friendship brings to the conversation several intimate accounts about the relationship between these two literary figures as well as their personal stories.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2020-06-15 19:55:14" } }
Volume 147

Guests on Volume 147

R. JARED STAUDT on the tradition of brewing beer in monastic and Christian culture
JASON PETERS on defining localism, dealing with discontent and imperfection, and appreciating nostalgia
D. C. SCHINDLER on the classical and Christian understanding of the Transcendentals and why they matter now
CRAIG GAY on why we need a theology of personhood in response to challenges posed by technology
MARY HIRSCHFELD on comparing contemporary economics with economics as understood by Thomas Aquinas
PATRICK SAMWAY on the publishing relationship between Flannery O’Connor and Robert Giroux

This Volume is also available on CD

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume. 

R. Jared Staudt

“What I’m trying to do in the book is to call people to rethink their lives. How does everything fit together? Is our faith really the center that integrates everything else?”

— R. Jared Staudt, author of The Beer Option: Brewing a Catholic Culture Yesterday and Today (Angelico Press, 2018)

Dominican oblate R. Jared Staudt wants to call attention to the cultural influence of the monastic tradition of brewing beer. Benedictine monasteries have themselves been recovering a lost tradition of craft brewing and Staudt’s book reminds Christians that brewing beer, among other practices, is part of what has shaped a way of life for Christians through many centuries. Beer traditionally served as part of one’s subsistence and now encourages local virtues such as building community, providing employment, and participating in local economies. Closely linked not only with festivities, but with the Benedictine theme of hospitality, sharing local beers with one’s friends and neighbors is just one way of integrating all of life into Christian faith and practice.       

•     •     •

Jason Peters

“We are habituated to the world long before we’re conscious of it. And then we find that we’re implicated in things that we would rather not be implicated in. And that’s a fact of existence; that’s a fact of the world as we find it. I think the honest thing is to own up to that and then to go about the modest but difficult task of shaking what has to be shaken.”

— Jason Peters, editor of Localism in the Mass Age: A Front Porch Republic Manifesto (Cascade Books, 2018)

English professor Jason Peters discusses the challenges of thinking about localism. While “localism” is a concept that has gained much ground in recent years, there is still the danger of it being a movement united around discontent over the current states of affairs, rather than around constructive or substantive principles. One way of overcoming this hurdle is by recognizing the various ways in which we are all implicated in “things as they are” whether we like it or not. A commitment to localism, says Peters, requires both honesty and modesty with regards to life as we find it. But such a recognition does not open the door to cynicism. Rather, it is a call to “get busy.” To be honest about our own embeddedness in the imperfections of life also protects a sense of home and even nostalgia for a lost home.       

•     •     •

D. C. Schindler

“The idea in this book in a way is to try to bring back a sense of the ontological depth of love. It’s certainly not a mere chemical reaction in the brain, but nor is it a mere emotion. It’s not even simply wishing others well, a kind of good will. It includes all those kinds of things in their proper place, but it’s ultimately I think the meaning of reality.”

— D. C. Schindler, author of Love and the Postmodern Predicament: Rediscovering the Real in Beauty, Goodness, and Truth (Cascade Books, 2018)

Philosopher D. C. Schindler examines how postmodernism poses a unique threat to our sense of an interior self. Schindler argues that the postmodern predicament requires a recovery of reality, which would be more easily achieved through a recovery of the classical and Christian understanding of the Transcendentals: Truth, Goodness, Beauty. Of key importance to this task is a renewed understanding of how Love and Beauty are connected and their capacity to unite us to what is really real.       

•     •     •

Craig Gay

“What we need is a robust theology of personhood. And what I’m trying to remind people of is that ‘hey, if we’re Christians, we have one! And we need to remember it.’ It’s there and it’s rich and it’s full and it’s been developed over many centuries by all kinds of really interesting, intelligent people. And this is something that we for a variety of reasons seem to have forgotten, but now it’s time to remember it, because it’s only as we remember this theology of personhood that we stand any chance of answering the kinds of questions that are being put to us today about technology and our use of it.”

— Craig Gay, author of Modern Technology and the Human Future: A Christian Appraisal (InterVarsity Press, 2018)

Sociologist Craig Gay argues that in order to address the challenges of a technological approach to the world, we need to recover the Christian tradition’s robust theology of personhood. Advocates for technological progress often point out how adaptable humans are, but Gay wants to push back, asking why it is that humans need to adapt to technology rather than the other way around. Simply having the ability to adapt does not mean that it is in our best interests to do so or that we ought to do so. Without asking the basic questions about the kinds of people we are or what we ought to become, we will be powerless to address the pressures imposed upon us by technological opportunities.       

•     •     •

Mary Hirschfeld

“My ‘self-concern,’ among other things, includes other people for Aquinas much more naturally than would an economist’s conception of it. But also my self-concern is about developing community, supporting my family, and developing my character, right, developing virtue. And if those are my ultimate concerns, however that looks in my particular life, [then] the material goods that are used to sustain that life are instrumental goods and because they’re instrumental goods, for Aquinas, our desire for them is finite.”

— Mary Hirschfeld, author of Aquinas and the Market: Toward a Human Economy (Harvard University Press, 2018)

Economist and theologian Mary Hirschfeld compares how modern economists think about the human person compared to Thomas Aquinas’s understanding of personhood with regards to property and material wealth. While it may be unintentional, Hirschfeld argues that modern economics makes some fundamental assumptions about personhood, material goods, and God that prevent the discipline from developing a truly human understanding of economic life. To correct this error takes some honest rethinking of the discipline (with many clarifications along the way).       

•     •     •

Patrick Samway

“We tend to think of a writer writing somehow in a cabin in the woods and it’s so beautiful. But as a matter of fact, these writers all have a lot of problems. And I thought it would be interesting to write about Flannery and her relationship with her editor. What I’m really writing about is the interstices. You know, the in-between times. What she was doing and what he was doing and how they collaborated.”

— Patrick Samway, author of Flannery O'Connor and Robert Giroux: A Publishing Partnership (University of Notre Dame Press, 2018)

Biographer and priest Patrick Samway talks about the relationship between fiction writer Flannery O’Connor and the legendary editor Robert Giroux. Samway’s direct link with Robert Giroux through their lasting friendship brings to the conversation several intimate accounts about the relationship between these two literary figures as well as their personal stories.       

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{ "product": {"id":4668940451903,"title":"Volume 146","handle":"mh-146-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 146\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mitchell\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMARK MITCHELL\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on liberalism’s false \u003cstrong\u003emetaphysical claims\u003c\/strong\u003e about purpose, human nature, and tradition\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#boersma\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eHANS BOERSMA\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the cultural implications of the\u003cstrong\u003e beatific vision\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#edmondson\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eHENRY T. EDMONDSON, III\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on \u003cstrong\u003eFlannery O’Connor’s\u003c\/strong\u003e understanding of political life\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#kries\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eBRIAN CLAYTON\u003c\/strong\u003e and \u003cstrong\u003eDOUGLAS KRIES\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the common and faulty assumption that \u003cstrong\u003efaith and reason\u003c\/strong\u003e cannot be reconciled\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#sweeney\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCONOR SWEENEY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on wrestling with the\u003cstrong\u003e ‘death of God’\u003c\/strong\u003e with the help of hobbit wisdom, religious experience, and sacramental theology\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#vanderhoof\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCAROLE VANDERHOOF\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the creative, intelligent, and demanding integrity of \u003cstrong\u003eDorothy L. Sayers\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-146-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-146-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mitchell\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMark Mitchell\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“What we have is a kind of competitor to that view: the idea that there is no normative human nature; there is no teleological structure to human life; and what human beings are at core is Will. That human beings are creatures of various and competing desires and to impose from the outside a kind of constraint on those desires, or a structure upon those desires that says ‘this is what human beings ought to do by virtue of their nature,’ is perceived as a constraint on one’s individual freedom.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Mark Mitchell, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Limits of Liberalism: Tradition, Individualism, and the Crisis of Freedom\u003cem\u003e (University of Notre Dame Press, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn the midst of so much turmoil surrounding the sustainability of political liberalism, professor of government Mark Mitchell asks whether there is anything that truly binds Americans together beyond their commitment to self-creation. Because liberalism presents an\u003cspan\u003e impoverished anthropology, which \u003c\/span\u003edenies both a normative nature and a given social context to human beings, the result is that human beings are nothing more than uninhibited wills and a combination of various competing desires. In his book,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Limits of Liberalism,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eMitchell examines the threat that liberalism poses to tradition especially and looks at three prominent thinkers who placed a high value upon tradition: Michael Oakeshott, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Michael Polanyi.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"boersma\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eHans Boersma\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“In an important sense, all of the world is a theater of God’s glory. It makes present God himself, so that . . . to the extent that we have spiritual eyes, we see God there. And when we see God there, that’s when we’re going to act, talk, think differently.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Hans Boersma, author of \u003c\/em\u003eSeeing God: The Beatific Vision in Christian Tradition\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eTheologian Hans Boersma argues that the beatific vision described throughout scripture is foreshadowed in “this-worldy experiences,” and that, particularly because of the Incarnation, eschatological experience is not only something in the future somewhere else, but is in fact connected with historical experience. Through this world, our purpose is to both perceive God’s glory and to be formed more and more like Christ, so that in the fullness of time we will be able to see God. This end, or\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etelos\u003c\/em\u003e, is built into all of creation and forms the horizon within which we engage with creation.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"edmondson\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eHenry T. Edmondson, III\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Rather than God being some component of history, I think she would say that history was a component of God. That we are interacting, whether we know it or not, with a transcendent order.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Henry T. Edmondson, III, editor of \u003c\/em\u003eA Political Companion to Flannery O'Connor\u003cem\u003e (University Press of Kentucky, 2017)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003ePolitical science professor Henry T. Edmondson, III talks about Flannery O’Connor’s understanding of political life, which was influenced by a range of thinkers including Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Eric Voegelin, and Russell Kirk. She shared with Kirk a suspicion of a “politics of tenderness” that focused on sentimentality over charity and his proposal for a prudential application of principles in favor of firm adherence to an ideology. Nonetheless, like Voegelin, O’Connor’s confidence in natural law and the supernatural allowed her to conceive of God as intrinsically acting within history.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"kries\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eBrian Clayton and Douglas Kries\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“With the Enlightenment, suddenly there was this restriction of the scope of reason . . . It could tell us principally about natural science or it could be a calculative kind of thing . . . but it doesn’t have anything to say about the big questions anymore . . . This narrowing of the scope of reason means ([Pope Benedict] went on to argue) that theology or faith doesn’t have anybody to talk to anymore. And that was his point about how in order for the dialogue between faith and reason to move forward, reason has got to expand. It has to have a little confidence in its ability to say what’s true.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Douglas Kries, author of \u003c\/em\u003eTwo Wings: Integrating Faith and Reason\u003cem\u003e (Ignatius Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003ePhilosophers Brian Clayton and Douglas Kries discuss how their students often approach the relationship between faith and reason, noting that faith is frequently reduced to a set of affirmed propositions and reason to a scientific and calculative faculty. The two categories are usually either opposed or simply assumed to be separate. But in lived experience, faith and reason inform each other quite often and are often mutually reinforcing. A more expansive understanding of faith involves trust as well as an element of desire or love, which motivates our reasoning towards practical, material, moral, or spiritual ends. Likewise, a more expansive understanding of reason is able to think compellingly about questions of being, goodness, truth, and even beauty.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"sweeney\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eConor Sweeney\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“For me, it’s about wrestling with the ‘death of God.’ Confronting the forces of Sauron, if you will, for us really requires going back to the sources. And to do that, I think, baptism is like the ultimate template: this adoption into God’s inner life through the Son. [Baptism] for me is one of the primary Christian things that probably I think many of us have forgotten just how radical it is and just how constitutive it is for the Christian life and the Christian difference.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Conor Sweeney, author of \u003c\/em\u003eAbiding the Long Defeat: How to Evangelize Like a Hobbit in a Disenchanted Age\u003cem\u003e (Angelico Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eIn order to properly respond to the challenges of postmodernity, philosopher and theologian Conor Sweeney argues that Christians need to get back to the sacramental structure of faith, meaning that fundamentally, our faith is a gift. Sweeney observes that within the culture of the Church, love, worship, and beauty have been eclipsed and that our recovery of these three depends a great deal on how we understand baptism — the sacrament that is pure gift and through which we are grafted into the family of God.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"vanderhoof\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eCarole Vanderhoof\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“All the way through, she insists on integrity and this high professional standard. You can hear her saying ‘Buck up! And get it right!’ and that was her attitude.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Carole Vanderhoof, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eThe Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers: Selections from Her Novels, Plays, Letters, and Essays\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Plough Publishing House, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eEditor Carole Vanderhoof talks about the work and personality of mystery writer and translator of Dante, Dorothy L. Sayers, whom C. S. Lewis fondly dubbed the “gleeful ogre.” Dorothy Sayers’s high standards for creativity as well as moral order and truth showed through in her works and in her actions, despite her “knowing how to have a good time.”        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-06-23T13:57:03-04:00","created_at":"2020-06-23T14:13:50-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["Beatific Vision","Brian Clayton","Carole Vanderhoof","Conor Sweeney","Dorothy L. Sayers","Douglas Kries","Faith and Reason","Flannery O'Connor","Hans Boersma","Henry T. Edmondson III","Mark Mitchell","Metaphysics","Sarcramental Theology"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":32626720997439,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-146-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 146","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-146.jpg?v=1605033350","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Mitchell.png?v=1605033350","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Boersma.png?v=1605033350","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Edmondson.png?v=1605033350","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Clayton_Kries.png?v=1605033350","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Sweeney.png?v=1605033350","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Vanderhoof.png?v=1605033350"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-146.jpg?v=1605033350","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7798019358783,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-146.jpg?v=1605033350"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-146.jpg?v=1605033350","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":7304796930111,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.677,"height":535,"width":362,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Mitchell.png?v=1605033350"},"aspect_ratio":0.677,"height":535,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Mitchell.png?v=1605033350","width":362},{"alt":null,"id":7304796831807,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.675,"height":541,"width":365,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Boersma.png?v=1605033350"},"aspect_ratio":0.675,"height":541,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Boersma.png?v=1605033350","width":365},{"alt":null,"id":7304796897343,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.672,"height":539,"width":362,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Edmondson.png?v=1605033350"},"aspect_ratio":0.672,"height":539,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Edmondson.png?v=1605033350","width":362},{"alt":null,"id":7304796864575,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.675,"height":536,"width":362,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Clayton_Kries.png?v=1605033350"},"aspect_ratio":0.675,"height":536,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Clayton_Kries.png?v=1605033350","width":362},{"alt":null,"id":7304796962879,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.705,"height":515,"width":363,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Sweeney.png?v=1605033350"},"aspect_ratio":0.705,"height":515,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Sweeney.png?v=1605033350","width":363},{"alt":null,"id":7304796995647,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.697,"height":521,"width":363,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Vanderhoof.png?v=1605033350"},"aspect_ratio":0.697,"height":521,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Vanderhoof.png?v=1605033350","width":363}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 146\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mitchell\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMARK MITCHELL\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on liberalism’s false \u003cstrong\u003emetaphysical claims\u003c\/strong\u003e about purpose, human nature, and tradition\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#boersma\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eHANS BOERSMA\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the cultural implications of the\u003cstrong\u003e beatific vision\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#edmondson\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eHENRY T. EDMONDSON, III\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on \u003cstrong\u003eFlannery O’Connor’s\u003c\/strong\u003e understanding of political life\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#kries\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eBRIAN CLAYTON\u003c\/strong\u003e and \u003cstrong\u003eDOUGLAS KRIES\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the common and faulty assumption that \u003cstrong\u003efaith and reason\u003c\/strong\u003e cannot be reconciled\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#sweeney\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCONOR SWEENEY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on wrestling with the\u003cstrong\u003e ‘death of God’\u003c\/strong\u003e with the help of hobbit wisdom, religious experience, and sacramental theology\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#vanderhoof\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCAROLE VANDERHOOF\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the creative, intelligent, and demanding integrity of \u003cstrong\u003eDorothy L. Sayers\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-146-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-146-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mitchell\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMark Mitchell\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“What we have is a kind of competitor to that view: the idea that there is no normative human nature; there is no teleological structure to human life; and what human beings are at core is Will. That human beings are creatures of various and competing desires and to impose from the outside a kind of constraint on those desires, or a structure upon those desires that says ‘this is what human beings ought to do by virtue of their nature,’ is perceived as a constraint on one’s individual freedom.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Mark Mitchell, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Limits of Liberalism: Tradition, Individualism, and the Crisis of Freedom\u003cem\u003e (University of Notre Dame Press, 2019)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn the midst of so much turmoil surrounding the sustainability of political liberalism, professor of government Mark Mitchell asks whether there is anything that truly binds Americans together beyond their commitment to self-creation. Because liberalism presents an\u003cspan\u003e impoverished anthropology, which \u003c\/span\u003edenies both a normative nature and a given social context to human beings, the result is that human beings are nothing more than uninhibited wills and a combination of various competing desires. In his book,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eThe Limits of Liberalism,\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eMitchell examines the threat that liberalism poses to tradition especially and looks at three prominent thinkers who placed a high value upon tradition: Michael Oakeshott, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Michael Polanyi.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"boersma\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eHans Boersma\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“In an important sense, all of the world is a theater of God’s glory. It makes present God himself, so that . . . to the extent that we have spiritual eyes, we see God there. And when we see God there, that’s when we’re going to act, talk, think differently.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Hans Boersma, author of \u003c\/em\u003eSeeing God: The Beatific Vision in Christian Tradition\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eTheologian Hans Boersma argues that the beatific vision described throughout scripture is foreshadowed in “this-worldy experiences,” and that, particularly because of the Incarnation, eschatological experience is not only something in the future somewhere else, but is in fact connected with historical experience. Through this world, our purpose is to both perceive God’s glory and to be formed more and more like Christ, so that in the fullness of time we will be able to see God. This end, or\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003etelos\u003c\/em\u003e, is built into all of creation and forms the horizon within which we engage with creation.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"edmondson\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eHenry T. Edmondson, III\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Rather than God being some component of history, I think she would say that history was a component of God. That we are interacting, whether we know it or not, with a transcendent order.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Henry T. Edmondson, III, editor of \u003c\/em\u003eA Political Companion to Flannery O'Connor\u003cem\u003e (University Press of Kentucky, 2017)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003ePolitical science professor Henry T. Edmondson, III talks about Flannery O’Connor’s understanding of political life, which was influenced by a range of thinkers including Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Eric Voegelin, and Russell Kirk. She shared with Kirk a suspicion of a “politics of tenderness” that focused on sentimentality over charity and his proposal for a prudential application of principles in favor of firm adherence to an ideology. Nonetheless, like Voegelin, O’Connor’s confidence in natural law and the supernatural allowed her to conceive of God as intrinsically acting within history.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"kries\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eBrian Clayton and Douglas Kries\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“With the Enlightenment, suddenly there was this restriction of the scope of reason . . . It could tell us principally about natural science or it could be a calculative kind of thing . . . but it doesn’t have anything to say about the big questions anymore . . . This narrowing of the scope of reason means ([Pope Benedict] went on to argue) that theology or faith doesn’t have anybody to talk to anymore. And that was his point about how in order for the dialogue between faith and reason to move forward, reason has got to expand. It has to have a little confidence in its ability to say what’s true.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Douglas Kries, author of \u003c\/em\u003eTwo Wings: Integrating Faith and Reason\u003cem\u003e (Ignatius Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003ePhilosophers Brian Clayton and Douglas Kries discuss how their students often approach the relationship between faith and reason, noting that faith is frequently reduced to a set of affirmed propositions and reason to a scientific and calculative faculty. The two categories are usually either opposed or simply assumed to be separate. But in lived experience, faith and reason inform each other quite often and are often mutually reinforcing. A more expansive understanding of faith involves trust as well as an element of desire or love, which motivates our reasoning towards practical, material, moral, or spiritual ends. Likewise, a more expansive understanding of reason is able to think compellingly about questions of being, goodness, truth, and even beauty.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"sweeney\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eConor Sweeney\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“For me, it’s about wrestling with the ‘death of God.’ Confronting the forces of Sauron, if you will, for us really requires going back to the sources. And to do that, I think, baptism is like the ultimate template: this adoption into God’s inner life through the Son. [Baptism] for me is one of the primary Christian things that probably I think many of us have forgotten just how radical it is and just how constitutive it is for the Christian life and the Christian difference.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Conor Sweeney, author of \u003c\/em\u003eAbiding the Long Defeat: How to Evangelize Like a Hobbit in a Disenchanted Age\u003cem\u003e (Angelico Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eIn order to properly respond to the challenges of postmodernity, philosopher and theologian Conor Sweeney argues that Christians need to get back to the sacramental structure of faith, meaning that fundamentally, our faith is a gift. Sweeney observes that within the culture of the Church, love, worship, and beauty have been eclipsed and that our recovery of these three depends a great deal on how we understand baptism — the sacrament that is pure gift and through which we are grafted into the family of God.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"vanderhoof\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eCarole Vanderhoof\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“All the way through, she insists on integrity and this high professional standard. You can hear her saying ‘Buck up! And get it right!’ and that was her attitude.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Carole Vanderhoof, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eThe Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers: Selections from Her Novels, Plays, Letters, and Essays\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Plough Publishing House, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eEditor Carole Vanderhoof talks about the work and personality of mystery writer and translator of Dante, Dorothy L. Sayers, whom C. S. Lewis fondly dubbed the “gleeful ogre.” Dorothy Sayers’s high standards for creativity as well as moral order and truth showed through in her works and in her actions, despite her “knowing how to have a good time.”        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2020-02-24 12:19:03" } }
Volume 146

Guests on Volume 146

MARK MITCHELL on liberalism’s false metaphysical claims about purpose, human nature, and tradition
HANS BOERSMA on the cultural implications of the beatific vision
HENRY T. EDMONDSON, III on Flannery O’Connor’s understanding of political life
• BRIAN CLAYTON and DOUGLAS KRIES on the common and faulty assumption that faith and reason cannot be reconciled
• CONOR SWEENEY on wrestling with the ‘death of God’ with the help of hobbit wisdom, religious experience, and sacramental theology
CAROLE VANDERHOOF on the creative, intelligent, and demanding integrity of Dorothy L. Sayers

This Volume is also available on CD

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume. 

Mark Mitchell

“What we have is a kind of competitor to that view: the idea that there is no normative human nature; there is no teleological structure to human life; and what human beings are at core is Will. That human beings are creatures of various and competing desires and to impose from the outside a kind of constraint on those desires, or a structure upon those desires that says ‘this is what human beings ought to do by virtue of their nature,’ is perceived as a constraint on one’s individual freedom.”

— Mark Mitchell, author of The Limits of Liberalism: Tradition, Individualism, and the Crisis of Freedom (University of Notre Dame Press, 2019)

In the midst of so much turmoil surrounding the sustainability of political liberalism, professor of government Mark Mitchell asks whether there is anything that truly binds Americans together beyond their commitment to self-creation. Because liberalism presents an impoverished anthropology, which denies both a normative nature and a given social context to human beings, the result is that human beings are nothing more than uninhibited wills and a combination of various competing desires. In his book, The Limits of Liberalism, Mitchell examines the threat that liberalism poses to tradition especially and looks at three prominent thinkers who placed a high value upon tradition: Michael Oakeshott, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Michael Polanyi.       

•     •     •

Hans Boersma

“In an important sense, all of the world is a theater of God’s glory. It makes present God himself, so that . . . to the extent that we have spiritual eyes, we see God there. And when we see God there, that’s when we’re going to act, talk, think differently.”

— Hans Boersma, author of Seeing God: The Beatific Vision in Christian Tradition (Eerdmans, 2018)

Theologian Hans Boersma argues that the beatific vision described throughout scripture is foreshadowed in “this-worldy experiences,” and that, particularly because of the Incarnation, eschatological experience is not only something in the future somewhere else, but is in fact connected with historical experience. Through this world, our purpose is to both perceive God’s glory and to be formed more and more like Christ, so that in the fullness of time we will be able to see God. This end, or telos, is built into all of creation and forms the horizon within which we engage with creation.       

•     •     •

Henry T. Edmondson, III

“Rather than God being some component of history, I think she would say that history was a component of God. That we are interacting, whether we know it or not, with a transcendent order.”

— Henry T. Edmondson, III, editor of A Political Companion to Flannery O'Connor (University Press of Kentucky, 2017)

Political science professor Henry T. Edmondson, III talks about Flannery O’Connor’s understanding of political life, which was influenced by a range of thinkers including Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Eric Voegelin, and Russell Kirk. She shared with Kirk a suspicion of a “politics of tenderness” that focused on sentimentality over charity and his proposal for a prudential application of principles in favor of firm adherence to an ideology. Nonetheless, like Voegelin, O’Connor’s confidence in natural law and the supernatural allowed her to conceive of God as intrinsically acting within history.       

•     •     •

Brian Clayton and Douglas Kries

“With the Enlightenment, suddenly there was this restriction of the scope of reason . . . It could tell us principally about natural science or it could be a calculative kind of thing . . . but it doesn’t have anything to say about the big questions anymore . . . This narrowing of the scope of reason means ([Pope Benedict] went on to argue) that theology or faith doesn’t have anybody to talk to anymore. And that was his point about how in order for the dialogue between faith and reason to move forward, reason has got to expand. It has to have a little confidence in its ability to say what’s true.”

— Douglas Kries, author of Two Wings: Integrating Faith and Reason (Ignatius Press, 2018)

Philosophers Brian Clayton and Douglas Kries discuss how their students often approach the relationship between faith and reason, noting that faith is frequently reduced to a set of affirmed propositions and reason to a scientific and calculative faculty. The two categories are usually either opposed or simply assumed to be separate. But in lived experience, faith and reason inform each other quite often and are often mutually reinforcing. A more expansive understanding of faith involves trust as well as an element of desire or love, which motivates our reasoning towards practical, material, moral, or spiritual ends. Likewise, a more expansive understanding of reason is able to think compellingly about questions of being, goodness, truth, and even beauty.       

•     •     •

Conor Sweeney

“For me, it’s about wrestling with the ‘death of God.’ Confronting the forces of Sauron, if you will, for us really requires going back to the sources. And to do that, I think, baptism is like the ultimate template: this adoption into God’s inner life through the Son. [Baptism] for me is one of the primary Christian things that probably I think many of us have forgotten just how radical it is and just how constitutive it is for the Christian life and the Christian difference.”

— Conor Sweeney, author of Abiding the Long Defeat: How to Evangelize Like a Hobbit in a Disenchanted Age (Angelico Press, 2018)

In order to properly respond to the challenges of postmodernity, philosopher and theologian Conor Sweeney argues that Christians need to get back to the sacramental structure of faith, meaning that fundamentally, our faith is a gift. Sweeney observes that within the culture of the Church, love, worship, and beauty have been eclipsed and that our recovery of these three depends a great deal on how we understand baptism — the sacrament that is pure gift and through which we are grafted into the family of God.       

•     •     •

Carole Vanderhoof

“All the way through, she insists on integrity and this high professional standard. You can hear her saying ‘Buck up! And get it right!’ and that was her attitude.”

— Carole Vanderhoof, author of The Gospel in Dorothy L. Sayers: Selections from Her Novels, Plays, Letters, and Essays (Plough Publishing House, 2018)

Editor Carole Vanderhoof talks about the work and personality of mystery writer and translator of Dante, Dorothy L. Sayers, whom C. S. Lewis fondly dubbed the “gleeful ogre.” Dorothy Sayers’s high standards for creativity as well as moral order and truth showed through in her works and in her actions, despite her “knowing how to have a good time.”       

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{ "product": {"id":4668938518591,"title":"Volume 145","handle":"mh-145-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 145\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#smith\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDAVID I. SMITH\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on Christian teaching as a set of \u003cstrong\u003epractices\u003c\/strong\u003e that accords with Christian content\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hindmarsh\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eBRUCE HINDMARSH\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the rise of the \u003cstrong\u003econversion narrative\u003c\/strong\u003e in early Evangelicalism\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#baxter\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJASON BAXTER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the psychological subtlety in \u003cstrong\u003eDante’s \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003ccite\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDivine Comedy\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/cite\u003e\u003cspan\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#fea\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJOHN FEA\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the entanglement of American \u003cstrong\u003eevangelicals and politics\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#gagne\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eLAURIE GAGNE\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the spiritual longing of French philosopher \u003cstrong\u003eSimone Weil\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#o'donovan\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMATTHEW O'DONOVAN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on singing \u003cstrong\u003eRenaissance polyphony\u003c\/strong\u003e with Stile Antico\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-145-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-145-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"smith\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eDavid I. Smith\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“If you start from a paradigm where the main meat of being Christian is getting doctrine straight — and I don’t mean to belittle that in anything I say here; that’s an important and worthy task — but if that’s 95 percent of what we’re writing about and therefore presumably thinking about, then it becomes very difficult to think about how faith relates to teaching in any other way than trying to find opportunities in our teaching to explain our doctrines.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—David I. Smith, author of \u003c\/em\u003eOn Christian Teaching: Practicing Faith in the Classroom\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eLanguage professor David I. Smith talks about how Christian education must involve more than correct doctrine. Because methods of teaching are often taken for granted or assumed to be neutral, many fail to reflect on the ways in which the form of teaching (its pedagogy) can contradict or reinforce Christian doctrine. For Smith, “Christian practices” are not just habits applied to worship or personal devotion, but must be incorporated into all of lived experience, which includes teaching and learning. Christian pedagogy is a way of Christian practice, which requires careful attention to how teachers use their bodies in space and time as well as to how they direct their students to inhabit a shared environment. In the words of David Smith, “I think of it as the rooting of teaching and learning in creation. It’s not just about the contents of my mind, it’s about the contours of the reality around me.”        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hindmarsh\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eBruce Hindmarsh\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“[Writing one’s own conversion narrative] requires something of a modern consciousness for it to be a truly popular genre for people to feel free to write about themselves without it being an offense against modesty.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Bruce Hindmarsh, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eThe Spirit of Early Evangelicalism: True Religion in a Modern World\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eChurch historian Bruce Hindmarsh discusses the rise of the personal conversion narrative that occurred during the spread of early Evangelicalism in England. Hindmarsh observes how the development of the conversion testimony as the preferred “text” coincides with the flourishing of the modern period and a modern understanding of the individual. Hindmarsh also talks about how early Evangelicals navigated church life and church unity within a church culture that placed so much emphasis on the experience of God’s presence.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"baxter\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJason Baxter\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I think Dante would have been heartbroken to know that we get more excited about his mud pit fights in Inferno than we do about his glorious divine dance of Paradiso.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jason Baxter, author of \u003c\/em\u003eA Beginner's Guide to Dante's \u003cem\u003eDivine Comedy (Baker Academic, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eHumanities professor Jason Baxter discusses the great psychological subtlety in Dante’s\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eDivine Comedy\u003c\/em\u003e. Throughout the\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eComedy\u003c\/em\u003e, Dante provides us a with a vision of hell in which sin is truly sickening and of paradise in which the Body of Christ finally sees the strength of its members as truly indispensable. Through his book,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eA Beginner’s Guide to Dante’s\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eDivine Comedy, Baxter introduces us to more than “an exciting adventure story” so that we might begin to participate in the soul’s awakening to and pursuit of Divine beauty.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"fea\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJohn Fea\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“You see this entanglement of Evangelicals and American politics all the way back to the coming of the American Revolution, so it’s not as if there was this kind of pure, undefiled type of Evangelicalism that was not influenced by politics.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— John Fea, author of \u003c\/em\u003eBelieve Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eHistorian John Fea talks about the murky waters of American Evangelicalism and its long history of rallying behind strong leaders. From the beginnings of the American Revolution up until Donald Trump, Evangelicals (and American protestants in general) have been attracted to power, often for the sake of sustaining the ideal of the American nation as a Christian nation. Fea discusses the current ambiguity surrounding the term “Evangelical” when used to describe voting polls in recent past elections. He also discusses the prominent role that fear has played in the relationship between Evangelicals and political life.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"gagne\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eLaurie Gagne\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“She said the true purpose of school studies was to cultivate a kind of attention that ultimately is necessary to encounter God. She said ultimately attention is the essence of prayer.” \u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Laurie Gagne, editor of \u003c\/em\u003eLove in the Void: Where God Finds Us\u003cem\u003e (Plough Publishing House, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eLaurie Gagne discusses the writings and thought of French philosopher Simone Weil. Weil died in 1943 in England at the age of 34 from a combination of malnourishment and tuberculosis. Because of her political idealism and great sympathy for the suffering of others, Weil contributed to her own death by self-rationing her food in order to suffer along with her fellow Frenchmen during German’s occupation of France. Weil was one of the great mystics of the twentieth century and, though agnostic for much of her life, earnestly sought after beauty and contemplative prayer. In this interview, Laurie Gagne describes how Weil’s conversion to Christianity revolved around her experience of the Eucharist, the witness of an Englishman, and a poem by George Herbert.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"o'donovan\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMatthew O’Donovan\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I think, also, what the sixteenth century saw with the advent of printing was a marked increase in the degree to which educated people could sing this music in their own homes, or sing similar things in their own homes, as they bought sets of part books and that sort of thing. I think we would be surprised by the degree to which musical literacy was an expected part of a solid education in the sixteenth century.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Matthew O’Donovan\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eProfessional singer and Director of Lower Chapel Music at Eaton College Matthew O'Donovan discusses the challenges of performing Renaissance polyphony — originally intended for a liturgical context — in a modern-day concert setting. As a founding member of the choral ensemble, Stile Antico, Matthew O’Donovan has sung much of the sixteenth century choral repertoire. In this conversation, he talks about the harmonic and structural capacities of the choral music of the Renaissance (as well as the vocal proficiency demanded of its performers).        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-06-23T13:57:03-04:00","created_at":"2020-06-23T14:13:09-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":[],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":32626713690175,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-145-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 145","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-145.jpg?v=1605033241"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-145.jpg?v=1605033241","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7798013788223,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-145.jpg?v=1605033241"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-145.jpg?v=1605033241","width":1060}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 145\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#smith\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDAVID I. SMITH\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on Christian teaching as a set of \u003cstrong\u003epractices\u003c\/strong\u003e that accords with Christian content\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hindmarsh\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eBRUCE HINDMARSH\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the rise of the \u003cstrong\u003econversion narrative\u003c\/strong\u003e in early Evangelicalism\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#baxter\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJASON BAXTER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the psychological subtlety in \u003cstrong\u003eDante’s \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003ccite\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDivine Comedy\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/cite\u003e\u003cspan\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#fea\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJOHN FEA\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the entanglement of American \u003cstrong\u003eevangelicals and politics\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#gagne\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eLAURIE GAGNE\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the spiritual longing of French philosopher \u003cstrong\u003eSimone Weil\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#o'donovan\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMATTHEW O'DONOVAN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on singing \u003cstrong\u003eRenaissance polyphony\u003c\/strong\u003e with Stile Antico\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-145-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-145-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"smith\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eDavid I. Smith\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\" align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“If you start from a paradigm where the main meat of being Christian is getting doctrine straight — and I don’t mean to belittle that in anything I say here; that’s an important and worthy task — but if that’s 95 percent of what we’re writing about and therefore presumably thinking about, then it becomes very difficult to think about how faith relates to teaching in any other way than trying to find opportunities in our teaching to explain our doctrines.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—David I. Smith, author of \u003c\/em\u003eOn Christian Teaching: Practicing Faith in the Classroom\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eLanguage professor David I. Smith talks about how Christian education must involve more than correct doctrine. Because methods of teaching are often taken for granted or assumed to be neutral, many fail to reflect on the ways in which the form of teaching (its pedagogy) can contradict or reinforce Christian doctrine. For Smith, “Christian practices” are not just habits applied to worship or personal devotion, but must be incorporated into all of lived experience, which includes teaching and learning. Christian pedagogy is a way of Christian practice, which requires careful attention to how teachers use their bodies in space and time as well as to how they direct their students to inhabit a shared environment. In the words of David Smith, “I think of it as the rooting of teaching and learning in creation. It’s not just about the contents of my mind, it’s about the contours of the reality around me.”        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hindmarsh\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eBruce Hindmarsh\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“[Writing one’s own conversion narrative] requires something of a modern consciousness for it to be a truly popular genre for people to feel free to write about themselves without it being an offense against modesty.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Bruce Hindmarsh, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eThe Spirit of Early Evangelicalism: True Religion in a Modern World\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2018)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eChurch historian Bruce Hindmarsh discusses the rise of the personal conversion narrative that occurred during the spread of early Evangelicalism in England. Hindmarsh observes how the development of the conversion testimony as the preferred “text” coincides with the flourishing of the modern period and a modern understanding of the individual. Hindmarsh also talks about how early Evangelicals navigated church life and church unity within a church culture that placed so much emphasis on the experience of God’s presence.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"baxter\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJason Baxter\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I think Dante would have been heartbroken to know that we get more excited about his mud pit fights in Inferno than we do about his glorious divine dance of Paradiso.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jason Baxter, author of \u003c\/em\u003eA Beginner's Guide to Dante's \u003cem\u003eDivine Comedy (Baker Academic, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eHumanities professor Jason Baxter discusses the great psychological subtlety in Dante’s\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eDivine Comedy\u003c\/em\u003e. Throughout the\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eComedy\u003c\/em\u003e, Dante provides us a with a vision of hell in which sin is truly sickening and of paradise in which the Body of Christ finally sees the strength of its members as truly indispensable. Through his book,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eA Beginner’s Guide to Dante’s\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eDivine Comedy, Baxter introduces us to more than “an exciting adventure story” so that we might begin to participate in the soul’s awakening to and pursuit of Divine beauty.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"fea\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJohn Fea\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“You see this entanglement of Evangelicals and American politics all the way back to the coming of the American Revolution, so it’s not as if there was this kind of pure, undefiled type of Evangelicalism that was not influenced by politics.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— John Fea, author of \u003c\/em\u003eBelieve Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eHistorian John Fea talks about the murky waters of American Evangelicalism and its long history of rallying behind strong leaders. From the beginnings of the American Revolution up until Donald Trump, Evangelicals (and American protestants in general) have been attracted to power, often for the sake of sustaining the ideal of the American nation as a Christian nation. Fea discusses the current ambiguity surrounding the term “Evangelical” when used to describe voting polls in recent past elections. He also discusses the prominent role that fear has played in the relationship between Evangelicals and political life.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"gagne\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eLaurie Gagne\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“She said the true purpose of school studies was to cultivate a kind of attention that ultimately is necessary to encounter God. She said ultimately attention is the essence of prayer.” \u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Laurie Gagne, editor of \u003c\/em\u003eLove in the Void: Where God Finds Us\u003cem\u003e (Plough Publishing House, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eLaurie Gagne discusses the writings and thought of French philosopher Simone Weil. Weil died in 1943 in England at the age of 34 from a combination of malnourishment and tuberculosis. Because of her political idealism and great sympathy for the suffering of others, Weil contributed to her own death by self-rationing her food in order to suffer along with her fellow Frenchmen during German’s occupation of France. Weil was one of the great mystics of the twentieth century and, though agnostic for much of her life, earnestly sought after beauty and contemplative prayer. In this interview, Laurie Gagne describes how Weil’s conversion to Christianity revolved around her experience of the Eucharist, the witness of an Englishman, and a poem by George Herbert.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"o'donovan\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMatthew O’Donovan\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“I think, also, what the sixteenth century saw with the advent of printing was a marked increase in the degree to which educated people could sing this music in their own homes, or sing similar things in their own homes, as they bought sets of part books and that sort of thing. I think we would be surprised by the degree to which musical literacy was an expected part of a solid education in the sixteenth century.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Matthew O’Donovan\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eProfessional singer and Director of Lower Chapel Music at Eaton College Matthew O'Donovan discusses the challenges of performing Renaissance polyphony — originally intended for a liturgical context — in a modern-day concert setting. As a founding member of the choral ensemble, Stile Antico, Matthew O’Donovan has sung much of the sixteenth century choral repertoire. In this conversation, he talks about the harmonic and structural capacities of the choral music of the Renaissance (as well as the vocal proficiency demanded of its performers).        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2019-11-25 12:19:03" } }
Volume 145

Guests on Volume 145

DAVID I. SMITH on Christian teaching as a set of practices that accords with Christian content
BRUCE HINDMARSH on the rise of the conversion narrative in early Evangelicalism
JASON BAXTER on the psychological subtlety in Dante’s 
Divine Comedy
JOHN FEA on the entanglement of American evangelicals and politics
LAURIE GAGNE on the spiritual longing of French philosopher Simone Weil
MATTHEW O'DONOVAN on singing Renaissance polyphony with Stile Antico

This Volume is also available on CD

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.

 David I. Smith

“If you start from a paradigm where the main meat of being Christian is getting doctrine straight — and I don’t mean to belittle that in anything I say here; that’s an important and worthy task — but if that’s 95 percent of what we’re writing about and therefore presumably thinking about, then it becomes very difficult to think about how faith relates to teaching in any other way than trying to find opportunities in our teaching to explain our doctrines.”

—David I. Smith, author of On Christian Teaching: Practicing Faith in the Classroom (Eerdmans, 2018)

Language professor David I. Smith talks about how Christian education must involve more than correct doctrine. Because methods of teaching are often taken for granted or assumed to be neutral, many fail to reflect on the ways in which the form of teaching (its pedagogy) can contradict or reinforce Christian doctrine. For Smith, “Christian practices” are not just habits applied to worship or personal devotion, but must be incorporated into all of lived experience, which includes teaching and learning. Christian pedagogy is a way of Christian practice, which requires careful attention to how teachers use their bodies in space and time as well as to how they direct their students to inhabit a shared environment. In the words of David Smith, “I think of it as the rooting of teaching and learning in creation. It’s not just about the contents of my mind, it’s about the contours of the reality around me.”       

•     •     •

Bruce Hindmarsh

“[Writing one’s own conversion narrative] requires something of a modern consciousness for it to be a truly popular genre for people to feel free to write about themselves without it being an offense against modesty.”

— Bruce Hindmarsh, author of The Spirit of Early Evangelicalism: True Religion in a Modern World (Oxford University Press, 2018)

Church historian Bruce Hindmarsh discusses the rise of the personal conversion narrative that occurred during the spread of early Evangelicalism in England. Hindmarsh observes how the development of the conversion testimony as the preferred “text” coincides with the flourishing of the modern period and a modern understanding of the individual. Hindmarsh also talks about how early Evangelicals navigated church life and church unity within a church culture that placed so much emphasis on the experience of God’s presence.       

•     •     •

Jason Baxter

“I think Dante would have been heartbroken to know that we get more excited about his mud pit fights in Inferno than we do about his glorious divine dance of Paradiso.”

— Jason Baxter, author of A Beginner's Guide to Dante's Divine Comedy (Baker Academic, 2018)

Humanities professor Jason Baxter discusses the great psychological subtlety in Dante’s Divine Comedy. Throughout the Comedy, Dante provides us a with a vision of hell in which sin is truly sickening and of paradise in which the Body of Christ finally sees the strength of its members as truly indispensable. Through his book, A Beginner’s Guide to Dante’s Divine Comedy, Baxter introduces us to more than “an exciting adventure story” so that we might begin to participate in the soul’s awakening to and pursuit of Divine beauty.       

•     •     •

John Fea

“You see this entanglement of Evangelicals and American politics all the way back to the coming of the American Revolution, so it’s not as if there was this kind of pure, undefiled type of Evangelicalism that was not influenced by politics.”

— John Fea, author of Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (Eerdmans, 2018)

Historian John Fea talks about the murky waters of American Evangelicalism and its long history of rallying behind strong leaders. From the beginnings of the American Revolution up until Donald Trump, Evangelicals (and American protestants in general) have been attracted to power, often for the sake of sustaining the ideal of the American nation as a Christian nation. Fea discusses the current ambiguity surrounding the term “Evangelical” when used to describe voting polls in recent past elections. He also discusses the prominent role that fear has played in the relationship between Evangelicals and political life.       

•     •     •

Laurie Gagne

“She said the true purpose of school studies was to cultivate a kind of attention that ultimately is necessary to encounter God. She said ultimately attention is the essence of prayer.” 

— Laurie Gagne, editor of Love in the Void: Where God Finds Us (Plough Publishing House, 2018)

Laurie Gagne discusses the writings and thought of French philosopher Simone Weil. Weil died in 1943 in England at the age of 34 from a combination of malnourishment and tuberculosis. Because of her political idealism and great sympathy for the suffering of others, Weil contributed to her own death by self-rationing her food in order to suffer along with her fellow Frenchmen during German’s occupation of France. Weil was one of the great mystics of the twentieth century and, though agnostic for much of her life, earnestly sought after beauty and contemplative prayer. In this interview, Laurie Gagne describes how Weil’s conversion to Christianity revolved around her experience of the Eucharist, the witness of an Englishman, and a poem by George Herbert.       

•     •     •

Matthew O’Donovan

“I think, also, what the sixteenth century saw with the advent of printing was a marked increase in the degree to which educated people could sing this music in their own homes, or sing similar things in their own homes, as they bought sets of part books and that sort of thing. I think we would be surprised by the degree to which musical literacy was an expected part of a solid education in the sixteenth century.”

— Matthew O’Donovan

Professional singer and Director of Lower Chapel Music at Eaton College Matthew O'Donovan discusses the challenges of performing Renaissance polyphony — originally intended for a liturgical context — in a modern-day concert setting. As a founding member of the choral ensemble, Stile Antico, Matthew O’Donovan has sung much of the sixteenth century choral repertoire. In this conversation, he talks about the harmonic and structural capacities of the choral music of the Renaissance (as well as the vocal proficiency demanded of its performers).       

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{ "product": {"id":4668937142335,"title":"Volume 144","handle":"mh-144-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 144\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mcintosh\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJONATHAN MCINTOSH\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the influence of St. Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical ideas on the work of \u003cstrong\u003eJ. R. R. Tolkien\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#vost\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eKEVIN VOST\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the history of thinking about \u003cstrong\u003efriendship\u003c\/strong\u003e in Patristic and Medieval Christian thought\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#guite\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMALCOM GUITE \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003eon wisdom from \u003cstrong\u003eSamuel Taylor Coleridge\u003c\/strong\u003e about reason and the imagination\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#cox\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eR. DAVID COX\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the influence of the Virginia Episcopalian tradition on the religious life of \u003cstrong\u003eRobert E. Lee\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#brodrecht\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eGRANT BRODRECHT\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on why Civil War-era evangelicals in the North placed such a high value on \u003cstrong\u003epreserving the Union\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#bouteneff\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePETER BOUTENEFF\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the theological richness of the music of \u003cstrong\u003eArvo Pärt\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-144-cd-edition\"\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-144-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mcintosh\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJonathan McIntosh\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eJonathan McIntosh claims that the mythological stories of J. R. R. Tolkien are rooted in certain metaphysical assumptions. These ideas are most clearly evident in the \u003ci\u003eAinulindalë, \u003c\/i\u003ethe creation account which Tolkien includes in \u003cem\u003eThe Silmarillion. \u003c\/em\u003eTolkien scholarship has tended to ignore the depth of influence on Tolkien’s understanding of Creation of the work of St. Thomas Aquinas. McIntosh is convinced that Aquinas’s discussion of the relationship between God and Creation serves as a helpful guide in understanding Tolkien’s instincts. In numerous letters and essays, Tolkien expressed his view that all works of art — of “sub-creation” — are a tribute to God’s own act of Creation, an act whereby the One who \u003cem\u003eis\u003c\/em\u003e Being gives being to the universe. All art is fundamentally about reality, and hence expresses metaphysical assumptions. McIntosh offers examples from Tolkien’s stories of his metaphysical concerns.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"vost\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eKevin Vost\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eKevin Vost explains that St. Aelred of Rievaulx’s treatise \u003cem\u003eSpiritual Friendship,\u003c\/em\u003e written in the twelfth century, is the first thorough examination of the nature of friendship in the Christian tradition. Friendship was understood to be compatible with the Christian command to extend charity to \u003cem\u003eall\u003c\/em\u003e neighbors. Spiritual friendship involves both the natural virtues and the virtue of charity. Aristotle, Cicero, and other pre-Christian writers had a helpful but limited understanding of friendship; the event of the Incarnation revealed God as capable and desirous of human friendship. The revelation of the Trinity is also transformative of the understanding of friendship, as God is understood as essentially relational. Vost describes St. Aelred’s warnings about destructive forms of “carnal” and “worldly” friendship, and about the vices that can destroy friendship.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"guite\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMalcolm Guite\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003ePoet Malcolm Guite observes that Samuel Taylor Coleridge was living in an age in which Reason was becoming a diminished faculty, and Creation was becoming understood in reductionistic, mechanistic, and materialistic terms. Coleridge reacted against these Enlightenment revisions and insisted that the human mind is actively engaged with reality. The mind of the Creator and the minds of God’s image-bearers share an essential correspondence, so that we can perceive the world correctly when we perceive it in light of the \u003cem\u003eLogos\u003c\/em\u003e. Guite explains how Coleridge’s understanding of the imagination had a profound effect on George MacDonald.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"cox\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eR. David Cox\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eR. David Cox says that the veneration of Robert E. Lee after his death has obscured both his political and religious convictions. As a faithful Virginia Episcopalian, Lee was situated between two wings of the church, one more latitudinarian and tending toward Deism, the other more evangelical and concerned for deep personal faith. From his father, Lee inherited the former form of faith, although his wife was clearly a proponent of the more zealous and experiential piety. The key theological idea that shaped Lee’s life was a belief in Providence, which guided his decisions both before, during, and after his involvement with the Civil War.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"brodrecht\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eGrant Brodrecht\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eGrant Brodrecht explains that Northern Evangelicals in the mid-nineteenth century believed that the Union of the American states was a means whereby God was bringing his Kingdom to Earth. Southern secession from that Union was a blasphemous rejection of God’s purposes in history, and demanded a vigorous response. Brodrecht says that Reconstruction failed to attend to the needs of freed slaves in part because the chief theologically necessitated aim of the War was achieved when the Union was re-established. Brodrecht also discusses the difference between two ways of understanding the meaning of nationhood: “civic nationalism” and “ethnocultural nationalism.” While many historians claim that Northern citizens (unlike Southerners) were civic nationalists, Brodrecht suggests that many nineteenth-century Northern Evangelicals look a lot more like ethnocultural nationalists.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"bouteneff\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003ePeter Bouteneff\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eTheologian Peter Bouteneff explains how engagement with Gregorian chant and early Renaissance polyphony — music from the life of the Western Church — contributed to composer Arvo Pärt’s conversion to Orthodoxy and his re-discovery of the meaning of melody and harmony. Pärt realized that this music arose from prayer, and that if he wanted to compose works with such qualities, he needed to reorder his own life by prayer. During a time of artistic and religious searching, Pärt was introduced to a number of sacred texts that would shape his thinking and composition. Bouteneff discusses unity in diversity — evident in the Incarnation and in the Trinity — and universality and particularity. The specificity of the religious texts Pärt sets to music does not prevent reception of a “universal” spiritual reality by his listeners.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-06-23T13:57:03-04:00","created_at":"2020-06-23T14:12:32-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":[],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":32626711035967,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-144-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 144","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-144.jpg?v=1605033136","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/McIntosh.png?v=1605033136","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Vost.png?v=1605033136","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Guite.png?v=1605033136","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Cox.png?v=1605033136","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Brodrecht.png?v=1605033136","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bouteneff.png?v=1605033136"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-144.jpg?v=1605033136","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7798008479807,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-144.jpg?v=1605033136"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-144.jpg?v=1605033136","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":7304810823743,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":518,"width":352,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/McIntosh.png?v=1605033136"},"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":518,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/McIntosh.png?v=1605033136","width":352},{"alt":null,"id":7304810856511,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.679,"height":517,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Vost.png?v=1605033136"},"aspect_ratio":0.679,"height":517,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Vost.png?v=1605033136","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7304810758207,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.675,"height":514,"width":347,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Guite.png?v=1605033136"},"aspect_ratio":0.675,"height":514,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Guite.png?v=1605033136","width":347},{"alt":null,"id":7304810725439,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.675,"height":514,"width":347,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Cox.png?v=1605033136"},"aspect_ratio":0.675,"height":514,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Cox.png?v=1605033136","width":347},{"alt":null,"id":7304810692671,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":518,"width":352,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Brodrecht.png?v=1605033136"},"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":518,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Brodrecht.png?v=1605033136","width":352},{"alt":null,"id":7304810659903,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.657,"height":527,"width":346,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bouteneff.png?v=1605033136"},"aspect_ratio":0.657,"height":527,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bouteneff.png?v=1605033136","width":346}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 144\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mcintosh\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJONATHAN MCINTOSH\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the influence of St. Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical ideas on the work of \u003cstrong\u003eJ. R. R. Tolkien\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#vost\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eKEVIN VOST\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the history of thinking about \u003cstrong\u003efriendship\u003c\/strong\u003e in Patristic and Medieval Christian thought\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#guite\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMALCOM GUITE \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003eon wisdom from \u003cstrong\u003eSamuel Taylor Coleridge\u003c\/strong\u003e about reason and the imagination\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#cox\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eR. DAVID COX\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the influence of the Virginia Episcopalian tradition on the religious life of \u003cstrong\u003eRobert E. Lee\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#brodrecht\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eGRANT BRODRECHT\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on why Civil War-era evangelicals in the North placed such a high value on \u003cstrong\u003epreserving the Union\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#bouteneff\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePETER BOUTENEFF\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the theological richness of the music of \u003cstrong\u003eArvo Pärt\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-144-cd-edition\"\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-144-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mcintosh\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJonathan McIntosh\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eJonathan McIntosh claims that the mythological stories of J. R. R. Tolkien are rooted in certain metaphysical assumptions. These ideas are most clearly evident in the \u003ci\u003eAinulindalë, \u003c\/i\u003ethe creation account which Tolkien includes in \u003cem\u003eThe Silmarillion. \u003c\/em\u003eTolkien scholarship has tended to ignore the depth of influence on Tolkien’s understanding of Creation of the work of St. Thomas Aquinas. McIntosh is convinced that Aquinas’s discussion of the relationship between God and Creation serves as a helpful guide in understanding Tolkien’s instincts. In numerous letters and essays, Tolkien expressed his view that all works of art — of “sub-creation” — are a tribute to God’s own act of Creation, an act whereby the One who \u003cem\u003eis\u003c\/em\u003e Being gives being to the universe. All art is fundamentally about reality, and hence expresses metaphysical assumptions. McIntosh offers examples from Tolkien’s stories of his metaphysical concerns.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"vost\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eKevin Vost\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eKevin Vost explains that St. Aelred of Rievaulx’s treatise \u003cem\u003eSpiritual Friendship,\u003c\/em\u003e written in the twelfth century, is the first thorough examination of the nature of friendship in the Christian tradition. Friendship was understood to be compatible with the Christian command to extend charity to \u003cem\u003eall\u003c\/em\u003e neighbors. Spiritual friendship involves both the natural virtues and the virtue of charity. Aristotle, Cicero, and other pre-Christian writers had a helpful but limited understanding of friendship; the event of the Incarnation revealed God as capable and desirous of human friendship. The revelation of the Trinity is also transformative of the understanding of friendship, as God is understood as essentially relational. Vost describes St. Aelred’s warnings about destructive forms of “carnal” and “worldly” friendship, and about the vices that can destroy friendship.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"guite\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMalcolm Guite\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003ePoet Malcolm Guite observes that Samuel Taylor Coleridge was living in an age in which Reason was becoming a diminished faculty, and Creation was becoming understood in reductionistic, mechanistic, and materialistic terms. Coleridge reacted against these Enlightenment revisions and insisted that the human mind is actively engaged with reality. The mind of the Creator and the minds of God’s image-bearers share an essential correspondence, so that we can perceive the world correctly when we perceive it in light of the \u003cem\u003eLogos\u003c\/em\u003e. Guite explains how Coleridge’s understanding of the imagination had a profound effect on George MacDonald.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"cox\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eR. David Cox\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003eR. David Cox says that the veneration of Robert E. Lee after his death has obscured both his political and religious convictions. As a faithful Virginia Episcopalian, Lee was situated between two wings of the church, one more latitudinarian and tending toward Deism, the other more evangelical and concerned for deep personal faith. From his father, Lee inherited the former form of faith, although his wife was clearly a proponent of the more zealous and experiential piety. The key theological idea that shaped Lee’s life was a belief in Providence, which guided his decisions both before, during, and after his involvement with the Civil War.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"brodrecht\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eGrant Brodrecht\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: left;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eGrant Brodrecht explains that Northern Evangelicals in the mid-nineteenth century believed that the Union of the American states was a means whereby God was bringing his Kingdom to Earth. Southern secession from that Union was a blasphemous rejection of God’s purposes in history, and demanded a vigorous response. Brodrecht says that Reconstruction failed to attend to the needs of freed slaves in part because the chief theologically necessitated aim of the War was achieved when the Union was re-established. Brodrecht also discusses the difference between two ways of understanding the meaning of nationhood: “civic nationalism” and “ethnocultural nationalism.” While many historians claim that Northern citizens (unlike Southerners) were civic nationalists, Brodrecht suggests that many nineteenth-century Northern Evangelicals look a lot more like ethnocultural nationalists.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"bouteneff\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003ePeter Bouteneff\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eTheologian Peter Bouteneff explains how engagement with Gregorian chant and early Renaissance polyphony — music from the life of the Western Church — contributed to composer Arvo Pärt’s conversion to Orthodoxy and his re-discovery of the meaning of melody and harmony. Pärt realized that this music arose from prayer, and that if he wanted to compose works with such qualities, he needed to reorder his own life by prayer. During a time of artistic and religious searching, Pärt was introduced to a number of sacred texts that would shape his thinking and composition. Bouteneff discusses unity in diversity — evident in the Incarnation and in the Trinity — and universality and particularity. The specificity of the religious texts Pärt sets to music does not prevent reception of a “universal” spiritual reality by his listeners.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2019-08-08 12:19:03" } }
Volume 144

Guests on Volume 144

• JONATHAN MCINTOSH on the influence of St. Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical ideas on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien
KEVIN VOST on the history of thinking about friendship in Patristic and Medieval Christian thought
• MALCOM GUITE on wisdom from Samuel Taylor Coleridge about reason and the imagination
• R. DAVID COX on the influence of the Virginia Episcopalian tradition on the religious life of Robert E. Lee
GRANT BRODRECHT on why Civil War-era evangelicals in the North placed such a high value on preserving the Union
• PETER BOUTENEFF on the theological richness of the music of Arvo Pärt

This Volume is also available on CD

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.

Jonathan McIntosh

Jonathan McIntosh claims that the mythological stories of J. R. R. Tolkien are rooted in certain metaphysical assumptions. These ideas are most clearly evident in the Ainulindalë, the creation account which Tolkien includes in The Silmarillion. Tolkien scholarship has tended to ignore the depth of influence on Tolkien’s understanding of Creation of the work of St. Thomas Aquinas. McIntosh is convinced that Aquinas’s discussion of the relationship between God and Creation serves as a helpful guide in understanding Tolkien’s instincts. In numerous letters and essays, Tolkien expressed his view that all works of art — of “sub-creation” — are a tribute to God’s own act of Creation, an act whereby the One who is Being gives being to the universe. All art is fundamentally about reality, and hence expresses metaphysical assumptions. McIntosh offers examples from Tolkien’s stories of his metaphysical concerns.       

•     •     •

Kevin Vost

Kevin Vost explains that St. Aelred of Rievaulx’s treatise Spiritual Friendship, written in the twelfth century, is the first thorough examination of the nature of friendship in the Christian tradition. Friendship was understood to be compatible with the Christian command to extend charity to all neighbors. Spiritual friendship involves both the natural virtues and the virtue of charity. Aristotle, Cicero, and other pre-Christian writers had a helpful but limited understanding of friendship; the event of the Incarnation revealed God as capable and desirous of human friendship. The revelation of the Trinity is also transformative of the understanding of friendship, as God is understood as essentially relational. Vost describes St. Aelred’s warnings about destructive forms of “carnal” and “worldly” friendship, and about the vices that can destroy friendship.       

•     •     •

Malcolm Guite

Poet Malcolm Guite observes that Samuel Taylor Coleridge was living in an age in which Reason was becoming a diminished faculty, and Creation was becoming understood in reductionistic, mechanistic, and materialistic terms. Coleridge reacted against these Enlightenment revisions and insisted that the human mind is actively engaged with reality. The mind of the Creator and the minds of God’s image-bearers share an essential correspondence, so that we can perceive the world correctly when we perceive it in light of the Logos. Guite explains how Coleridge’s understanding of the imagination had a profound effect on George MacDonald.       

•     •     •

R. David Cox

R. David Cox says that the veneration of Robert E. Lee after his death has obscured both his political and religious convictions. As a faithful Virginia Episcopalian, Lee was situated between two wings of the church, one more latitudinarian and tending toward Deism, the other more evangelical and concerned for deep personal faith. From his father, Lee inherited the former form of faith, although his wife was clearly a proponent of the more zealous and experiential piety. The key theological idea that shaped Lee’s life was a belief in Providence, which guided his decisions both before, during, and after his involvement with the Civil War.       

•     •     •

Grant Brodrecht

Grant Brodrecht explains that Northern Evangelicals in the mid-nineteenth century believed that the Union of the American states was a means whereby God was bringing his Kingdom to Earth. Southern secession from that Union was a blasphemous rejection of God’s purposes in history, and demanded a vigorous response. Brodrecht says that Reconstruction failed to attend to the needs of freed slaves in part because the chief theologically necessitated aim of the War was achieved when the Union was re-established. Brodrecht also discusses the difference between two ways of understanding the meaning of nationhood: “civic nationalism” and “ethnocultural nationalism.” While many historians claim that Northern citizens (unlike Southerners) were civic nationalists, Brodrecht suggests that many nineteenth-century Northern Evangelicals look a lot more like ethnocultural nationalists.       

•     •     •

Peter Bouteneff

Theologian Peter Bouteneff explains how engagement with Gregorian chant and early Renaissance polyphony — music from the life of the Western Church — contributed to composer Arvo Pärt’s conversion to Orthodoxy and his re-discovery of the meaning of melody and harmony. Pärt realized that this music arose from prayer, and that if he wanted to compose works with such qualities, he needed to reorder his own life by prayer. During a time of artistic and religious searching, Pärt was introduced to a number of sacred texts that would shape his thinking and composition. Bouteneff discusses unity in diversity — evident in the Incarnation and in the Trinity — and universality and particularity. The specificity of the religious texts Pärt sets to music does not prevent reception of a “universal” spiritual reality by his listeners.       

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{ "product": {"id":4668933865535,"title":"Volume 143","handle":"mh-143-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 143\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#regnerus\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMARK REGNERUS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the effects of social changes in modernity on \u003cstrong\u003esexual behavior\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#wilson\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJESSICA HOOTEN WILSON\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the influence of Fyodor Dostoevsky on\u003cstrong\u003e Walker\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003cstrong\u003ePercy’s\u003c\/strong\u003e convictions and his approach to writing\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#henry-crosby\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJOHN HENRY CROSBY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the heroic witness borne by \u003cstrong\u003eDietrich von Hildebrand\u003c\/strong\u003e (1889-1977) in his philosophical writings and his battle against Nazism\u003cbr\u003e•\u003ca href=\"#f-crosby\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e JOHN F. CROSBY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the influence of the schools of phenomenology and personalism in the thought of\u003cstrong\u003e Dietrich von Hildebrand\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e•\u003ca href=\"#beer\"\u003e \u003cstrong\u003eWYNAND DE BEER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on lessons from \u003cstrong\u003eHellenic cosmology\u003c\/strong\u003e about the metaphysical questions raised by organic diversity and change\u003cbr\u003e•\u003ca href=\"#higgins\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e S\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eØ\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eRINA HIGGINS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e, on the perennial appeal of the stories inspired by the figure of \u003cstrong\u003eKing Arthur\u003c\/strong\u003e, especially in the work of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, and Owen Barfield.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-143-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-143-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"regnerus\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eMark Regnerus\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“[Through contraception sexuality became] separated from the idea that this act could generate life, so I think the argument in the book (and I think the evidence bears it out) is that sex has become more of an infertile act in itself. Independently of what your partner is on or not on in terms of contraception, people are thinking of sex as a baseline infertile act . . . I think in this is a building of a new narrative, one that suggests that sex is infertile until proven otherwise.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Mark Regnerus, author of \u003c\/em\u003eCheap Sex: The Transformation of Men, Marriage, and Monogamy\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2017)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eSociologist Mark Regnerus examines how the dating market and marriage practices have changed over the past several decades. He also explains some of the particular data sampling challenges that sociologists have to hurdle when asking questions about sexuality and marital relations. Regnerus sees the disintegration of certain social structures that historically have informed men and women about what relationships should look like and what their purposes are as largely contributing to the changes in marriage rates and sexual activity. He introduces his readers to the prescient insights of sociologist Anthony Giddens, author of \u003cem\u003eThe Transformation of Intimacy, \u003c\/em\u003eparticularly the notion of a “pure relationship\u003ci\u003e.”\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"wilson\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJessica Hooten Wilson\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“It’s part of our nature to imitate and to look back at our models. What does that mean for writers then? Why is it that we’ve disregarded our influences and we think that it kills our originality or we must protect our uniqueness by not admitting whom we’ve read before? Instead, Percy is coming out of this very humble place (having been a physician and not a novelist) and recognizing [that] in science you always stand on the shoulders of giants . . . So Percy had a habit of looking back at the writers that could influence him.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jessica Hooten Wilson, author of \u003c\/em\u003eReading Walker Percy's Novels\u003cem\u003e (LSU Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eLiterary scholar Jessica Hooten Wilson explains how she realized that the writings of Fyodor Dostoevksy greatly influenced the writing of novelist Walker Percy. “Influence,” however, is often taboo among writers and artists for fear that they might lose credibility as creative or original. But Wilson wants to restore the place of imitation. Influence, argues Wilson, can never truly be avoided without losing artistic integrity. Wilson also discusses the diagnostic stance towards modern man that characterizes Percy’s novels as well as his skepticism towards modern “self-help techniques” that disregard a vision of man rooted in transcendence.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"henry-crosby\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJohn Henry Crosby\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“I like to say that unlike someone like Cardinal Newman, who read his way into the Church, or someone like Augustine, you know, the classic case of a conversion rooted in moral reformation, moral awakening, in von Hildebrand’s case, it was really the attraction through the beautiful.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— John Henry Crosby, The Hildebrand Project \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003ePresident and founder of the Hildebrand Project John Henry Crosby describes Dietrich von Hildebrand’s roles as philosopher, Christian witness, political witness, and cultural representative. Von Hildebrand wrote eloquently for his fellow Christians about theological matters from the perspective of a lay Christian. During the middle of the twentieth century when Nazism was growing, von Hildebrand risked his life to fight against the anti-humanism of totalitarianism. And as a critic of culture, von Hildebrand urgently defended beauty, arguing that beauty is an essentially human and Christian topic that demands and deserves as much reverence as questions of ethics and doctrine.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"f-crosby\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJohn F. Crosby\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“[B]eauty somehow addresses us as persons and calls for appreciation, and yet [von Hildebrand] doesn’t want to cross the line into subjectivism as if the beauty doesn’t exist except in our appreciation. It’s there, but it has . . . this appeal to us, this — as he says in a few places, it turns its face to us and is somehow left incomplete if there’s no human who understands it and is caught up and edified by it.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— John F. Crosby, The Hildebrand Project\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003ePhilosopher and former student of Dietrich von Hildebrand John F. Crosby offers some helpful descriptions of the philosophical schools called phenomenology and personalism and how von Hildebrand’s thought reflects these approaches. Von Hildebrand felt that things and people needed to be protected from a reductionist mindset that collapsed the integrity of a thing into something incomplete and incompatible with real experience. His reflections on beauty and human freedom both take into account the inner life of persons and of things that influences how we relate to the world around us.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"beer\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eWynand de Beer\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“It was [Étienne] Gilson who first showed me the etymology of the word ‘evolution,’ being derived from the Latin\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eevolvere\u003cem\u003e, meaning ‘to unfold.’ And only that which has been enfolded can be unfolded; only that which has been enveloped can be developed.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Wynand de Beer, author of \u003c\/em\u003eFrom Logos to Bios: Evolutionary Theory in Light of Plato, Aristotle, and Neoplatonism\u003cem\u003e (Angelico Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eHellenic and Patristic scholar Wynand de Beer introduces some alternative evolutionary theories that have existed since Greek philosophy and which offer a different metaphysics from that of Darwinian evolutionary theory. De Beer explains that Darwinian theories of transformation fit well within a modern understanding of causality that recognizes only mechanical or material causes, which may account for why Darwinian evolution is often presumed to be the only evolutionary option available. In his book, \u003cem\u003eFrom Logos to Bios\u003c\/em\u003e, de Beer explores how Greek metaphysics can inform how we think about the origins of life on earth.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"higgins\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eSørina Higgins\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Their Arthurian works are there to communicate the idea that there is a union between what we tend to call the natural and the supernatural . . . [The Grail] is a physical locus where the natural and the supernatural touch. So another word that might work for all of this is ‘sacramental.’ I would say that The Inklings had a very sacramental vision of the world and Arthuriana and so the Grail works as an image for that.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Sørina Higgins, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Inklings and King Arthur\u003cem\u003e (Apocryphile Press, 2017)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eLiterary scholar Sørina Higgins talks about how the legend of King Arthur has served the English people in various political and social contexts. Due to its variety of sources, the Arthurian legend is particularly pliable and therefore easily adaptable for different political and social purposes, whether that be establishing ruling legitimacy — as in the Tudor era — or critiquing assumptions about class and gender — as in the Victorian period. For The Inklings, especially Charles Williams and J. R. R. Tolkien, Arthuriana material was a way of combating the destructive and reductive patterns of their late modern context.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-06-23T13:57:03-04:00","created_at":"2020-06-23T14:11:04-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":[],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":32626703302719,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-143-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 143","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-143.jpg?v=1605033023","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Regnerus.png?v=1605033023","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/HootenWilson.png?v=1605033023","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hildebrand_Aesthetics.png?v=1605033023","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hildebrand.png?v=1605033023","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/DeBeer.png?v=1605033023","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Higgins.png?v=1605033023"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-143.jpg?v=1605033023","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7798002548799,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-143.jpg?v=1605033023"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-143.jpg?v=1605033023","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":7304816754751,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.676,"height":519,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Regnerus.png?v=1605033023"},"aspect_ratio":0.676,"height":519,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Regnerus.png?v=1605033023","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7304816721983,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.676,"height":512,"width":346,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/HootenWilson.png?v=1605033023"},"aspect_ratio":0.676,"height":512,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/HootenWilson.png?v=1605033023","width":346},{"alt":null,"id":7304816656447,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.679,"height":517,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hildebrand_Aesthetics.png?v=1605033023"},"aspect_ratio":0.679,"height":517,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hildebrand_Aesthetics.png?v=1605033023","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7304816689215,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.678,"height":518,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hildebrand.png?v=1605033023"},"aspect_ratio":0.678,"height":518,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hildebrand.png?v=1605033023","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7304816590911,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.678,"height":518,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/DeBeer.png?v=1605033023"},"aspect_ratio":0.678,"height":518,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/DeBeer.png?v=1605033023","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7304816623679,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.819,"height":452,"width":370,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Higgins.png?v=1605033023"},"aspect_ratio":0.819,"height":452,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Higgins.png?v=1605033023","width":370}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 143\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#regnerus\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMARK REGNERUS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the effects of social changes in modernity on \u003cstrong\u003esexual behavior\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#wilson\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJESSICA HOOTEN WILSON\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the influence of Fyodor Dostoevsky on\u003cstrong\u003e Walker\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003cstrong\u003ePercy’s\u003c\/strong\u003e convictions and his approach to writing\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#henry-crosby\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJOHN HENRY CROSBY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the heroic witness borne by \u003cstrong\u003eDietrich von Hildebrand\u003c\/strong\u003e (1889-1977) in his philosophical writings and his battle against Nazism\u003cbr\u003e•\u003ca href=\"#f-crosby\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e JOHN F. CROSBY\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the influence of the schools of phenomenology and personalism in the thought of\u003cstrong\u003e Dietrich von Hildebrand\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e•\u003ca href=\"#beer\"\u003e \u003cstrong\u003eWYNAND DE BEER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on lessons from \u003cstrong\u003eHellenic cosmology\u003c\/strong\u003e about the metaphysical questions raised by organic diversity and change\u003cbr\u003e•\u003ca href=\"#higgins\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e S\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eØ\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eRINA HIGGINS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e, on the perennial appeal of the stories inspired by the figure of \u003cstrong\u003eKing Arthur\u003c\/strong\u003e, especially in the work of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, and Owen Barfield.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-143-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-143-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"regnerus\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e \u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eMark Regnerus\u003c\/em\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“[Through contraception sexuality became] separated from the idea that this act could generate life, so I think the argument in the book (and I think the evidence bears it out) is that sex has become more of an infertile act in itself. Independently of what your partner is on or not on in terms of contraception, people are thinking of sex as a baseline infertile act . . . I think in this is a building of a new narrative, one that suggests that sex is infertile until proven otherwise.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Mark Regnerus, author of \u003c\/em\u003eCheap Sex: The Transformation of Men, Marriage, and Monogamy\u003cem\u003e (Oxford University Press, 2017)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eSociologist Mark Regnerus examines how the dating market and marriage practices have changed over the past several decades. He also explains some of the particular data sampling challenges that sociologists have to hurdle when asking questions about sexuality and marital relations. Regnerus sees the disintegration of certain social structures that historically have informed men and women about what relationships should look like and what their purposes are as largely contributing to the changes in marriage rates and sexual activity. He introduces his readers to the prescient insights of sociologist Anthony Giddens, author of \u003cem\u003eThe Transformation of Intimacy, \u003c\/em\u003eparticularly the notion of a “pure relationship\u003ci\u003e.”\u003c\/i\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"wilson\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJessica Hooten Wilson\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“It’s part of our nature to imitate and to look back at our models. What does that mean for writers then? Why is it that we’ve disregarded our influences and we think that it kills our originality or we must protect our uniqueness by not admitting whom we’ve read before? Instead, Percy is coming out of this very humble place (having been a physician and not a novelist) and recognizing [that] in science you always stand on the shoulders of giants . . . So Percy had a habit of looking back at the writers that could influence him.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jessica Hooten Wilson, author of \u003c\/em\u003eReading Walker Percy's Novels\u003cem\u003e (LSU Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eLiterary scholar Jessica Hooten Wilson explains how she realized that the writings of Fyodor Dostoevksy greatly influenced the writing of novelist Walker Percy. “Influence,” however, is often taboo among writers and artists for fear that they might lose credibility as creative or original. But Wilson wants to restore the place of imitation. Influence, argues Wilson, can never truly be avoided without losing artistic integrity. Wilson also discusses the diagnostic stance towards modern man that characterizes Percy’s novels as well as his skepticism towards modern “self-help techniques” that disregard a vision of man rooted in transcendence.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"henry-crosby\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJohn Henry Crosby\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“I like to say that unlike someone like Cardinal Newman, who read his way into the Church, or someone like Augustine, you know, the classic case of a conversion rooted in moral reformation, moral awakening, in von Hildebrand’s case, it was really the attraction through the beautiful.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— John Henry Crosby, The Hildebrand Project \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003ePresident and founder of the Hildebrand Project John Henry Crosby describes Dietrich von Hildebrand’s roles as philosopher, Christian witness, political witness, and cultural representative. Von Hildebrand wrote eloquently for his fellow Christians about theological matters from the perspective of a lay Christian. During the middle of the twentieth century when Nazism was growing, von Hildebrand risked his life to fight against the anti-humanism of totalitarianism. And as a critic of culture, von Hildebrand urgently defended beauty, arguing that beauty is an essentially human and Christian topic that demands and deserves as much reverence as questions of ethics and doctrine.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"f-crosby\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJohn F. Crosby\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“[B]eauty somehow addresses us as persons and calls for appreciation, and yet [von Hildebrand] doesn’t want to cross the line into subjectivism as if the beauty doesn’t exist except in our appreciation. It’s there, but it has . . . this appeal to us, this — as he says in a few places, it turns its face to us and is somehow left incomplete if there’s no human who understands it and is caught up and edified by it.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— John F. Crosby, The Hildebrand Project\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003ePhilosopher and former student of Dietrich von Hildebrand John F. Crosby offers some helpful descriptions of the philosophical schools called phenomenology and personalism and how von Hildebrand’s thought reflects these approaches. Von Hildebrand felt that things and people needed to be protected from a reductionist mindset that collapsed the integrity of a thing into something incomplete and incompatible with real experience. His reflections on beauty and human freedom both take into account the inner life of persons and of things that influences how we relate to the world around us.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"beer\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eWynand de Beer\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“It was [Étienne] Gilson who first showed me the etymology of the word ‘evolution,’ being derived from the Latin\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eevolvere\u003cem\u003e, meaning ‘to unfold.’ And only that which has been enfolded can be unfolded; only that which has been enveloped can be developed.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Wynand de Beer, author of \u003c\/em\u003eFrom Logos to Bios: Evolutionary Theory in Light of Plato, Aristotle, and Neoplatonism\u003cem\u003e (Angelico Press, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eHellenic and Patristic scholar Wynand de Beer introduces some alternative evolutionary theories that have existed since Greek philosophy and which offer a different metaphysics from that of Darwinian evolutionary theory. De Beer explains that Darwinian theories of transformation fit well within a modern understanding of causality that recognizes only mechanical or material causes, which may account for why Darwinian evolution is often presumed to be the only evolutionary option available. In his book, \u003cem\u003eFrom Logos to Bios\u003c\/em\u003e, de Beer explores how Greek metaphysics can inform how we think about the origins of life on earth.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"higgins\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eSørina Higgins\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Their Arthurian works are there to communicate the idea that there is a union between what we tend to call the natural and the supernatural . . . [The Grail] is a physical locus where the natural and the supernatural touch. So another word that might work for all of this is ‘sacramental.’ I would say that The Inklings had a very sacramental vision of the world and Arthuriana and so the Grail works as an image for that.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Sørina Higgins, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Inklings and King Arthur\u003cem\u003e (Apocryphile Press, 2017)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003e\u003cspan\u003eLiterary scholar Sørina Higgins talks about how the legend of King Arthur has served the English people in various political and social contexts. Due to its variety of sources, the Arthurian legend is particularly pliable and therefore easily adaptable for different political and social purposes, whether that be establishing ruling legitimacy — as in the Tudor era — or critiquing assumptions about class and gender — as in the Victorian period. For The Inklings, especially Charles Williams and J. R. R. Tolkien, Arthuriana material was a way of combating the destructive and reductive patterns of their late modern context.\u003c\/span\u003e        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2019-05-02 12:19:03" } }
Volume 143

Guests on Volume 143

MARK REGNERUS on the effects of social changes in modernity on sexual behavior
JESSICA HOOTEN WILSON on the influence of Fyodor Dostoevsky on Walker Percy’s convictions and his approach to writing
JOHN HENRY CROSBY on the heroic witness borne by Dietrich von Hildebrand (1889-1977) in his philosophical writings and his battle against Nazism
JOHN F. CROSBY on the influence of the schools of phenomenology and personalism in the thought of Dietrich von Hildebrand
WYNAND DE BEER on lessons from Hellenic cosmology about the metaphysical questions raised by organic diversity and change
SØRINA HIGGINS, on the perennial appeal of the stories inspired by the figure of King Arthur, especially in the work of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, and Owen Barfield.

This Volume is also available on CD

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.

 Mark Regnerus

“[Through contraception sexuality became] separated from the idea that this act could generate life, so I think the argument in the book (and I think the evidence bears it out) is that sex has become more of an infertile act in itself. Independently of what your partner is on or not on in terms of contraception, people are thinking of sex as a baseline infertile act . . . I think in this is a building of a new narrative, one that suggests that sex is infertile until proven otherwise.”

— Mark Regnerus, author of Cheap Sex: The Transformation of Men, Marriage, and Monogamy (Oxford University Press, 2017)

Sociologist Mark Regnerus examines how the dating market and marriage practices have changed over the past several decades. He also explains some of the particular data sampling challenges that sociologists have to hurdle when asking questions about sexuality and marital relations. Regnerus sees the disintegration of certain social structures that historically have informed men and women about what relationships should look like and what their purposes are as largely contributing to the changes in marriage rates and sexual activity. He introduces his readers to the prescient insights of sociologist Anthony Giddens, author of The Transformation of Intimacy, particularly the notion of a “pure relationship.”       

•     •     •

Jessica Hooten Wilson

“It’s part of our nature to imitate and to look back at our models. What does that mean for writers then? Why is it that we’ve disregarded our influences and we think that it kills our originality or we must protect our uniqueness by not admitting whom we’ve read before? Instead, Percy is coming out of this very humble place (having been a physician and not a novelist) and recognizing [that] in science you always stand on the shoulders of giants . . . So Percy had a habit of looking back at the writers that could influence him.”

— Jessica Hooten Wilson, author of Reading Walker Percy's Novels (LSU Press, 2018)

Literary scholar Jessica Hooten Wilson explains how she realized that the writings of Fyodor Dostoevksy greatly influenced the writing of novelist Walker Percy. “Influence,” however, is often taboo among writers and artists for fear that they might lose credibility as creative or original. But Wilson wants to restore the place of imitation. Influence, argues Wilson, can never truly be avoided without losing artistic integrity. Wilson also discusses the diagnostic stance towards modern man that characterizes Percy’s novels as well as his skepticism towards modern “self-help techniques” that disregard a vision of man rooted in transcendence.       

•     •     •

John Henry Crosby

“I like to say that unlike someone like Cardinal Newman, who read his way into the Church, or someone like Augustine, you know, the classic case of a conversion rooted in moral reformation, moral awakening, in von Hildebrand’s case, it was really the attraction through the beautiful.”

— John Henry Crosby, The Hildebrand Project 

President and founder of the Hildebrand Project John Henry Crosby describes Dietrich von Hildebrand’s roles as philosopher, Christian witness, political witness, and cultural representative. Von Hildebrand wrote eloquently for his fellow Christians about theological matters from the perspective of a lay Christian. During the middle of the twentieth century when Nazism was growing, von Hildebrand risked his life to fight against the anti-humanism of totalitarianism. And as a critic of culture, von Hildebrand urgently defended beauty, arguing that beauty is an essentially human and Christian topic that demands and deserves as much reverence as questions of ethics and doctrine.       

•     •     •

John F. Crosby

“[B]eauty somehow addresses us as persons and calls for appreciation, and yet [von Hildebrand] doesn’t want to cross the line into subjectivism as if the beauty doesn’t exist except in our appreciation. It’s there, but it has . . . this appeal to us, this — as he says in a few places, it turns its face to us and is somehow left incomplete if there’s no human who understands it and is caught up and edified by it.”

— John F. Crosby, The Hildebrand Project

Philosopher and former student of Dietrich von Hildebrand John F. Crosby offers some helpful descriptions of the philosophical schools called phenomenology and personalism and how von Hildebrand’s thought reflects these approaches. Von Hildebrand felt that things and people needed to be protected from a reductionist mindset that collapsed the integrity of a thing into something incomplete and incompatible with real experience. His reflections on beauty and human freedom both take into account the inner life of persons and of things that influences how we relate to the world around us.       

•     •     •

Wynand de Beer

“It was [Étienne] Gilson who first showed me the etymology of the word ‘evolution,’ being derived from the Latin evolvere, meaning ‘to unfold.’ And only that which has been enfolded can be unfolded; only that which has been enveloped can be developed.”

— Wynand de Beer, author of From Logos to Bios: Evolutionary Theory in Light of Plato, Aristotle, and Neoplatonism (Angelico Press, 2018)

Hellenic and Patristic scholar Wynand de Beer introduces some alternative evolutionary theories that have existed since Greek philosophy and which offer a different metaphysics from that of Darwinian evolutionary theory. De Beer explains that Darwinian theories of transformation fit well within a modern understanding of causality that recognizes only mechanical or material causes, which may account for why Darwinian evolution is often presumed to be the only evolutionary option available. In his book, From Logos to Bios, de Beer explores how Greek metaphysics can inform how we think about the origins of life on earth.       

•     •     •

Sørina Higgins

“Their Arthurian works are there to communicate the idea that there is a union between what we tend to call the natural and the supernatural . . . [The Grail] is a physical locus where the natural and the supernatural touch. So another word that might work for all of this is ‘sacramental.’ I would say that The Inklings had a very sacramental vision of the world and Arthuriana and so the Grail works as an image for that.”

— Sørina Higgins, author of The Inklings and King Arthur (Apocryphile Press, 2017)

Literary scholar Sørina Higgins talks about how the legend of King Arthur has served the English people in various political and social contexts. Due to its variety of sources, the Arthurian legend is particularly pliable and therefore easily adaptable for different political and social purposes, whether that be establishing ruling legitimacy — as in the Tudor era — or critiquing assumptions about class and gender — as in the Victorian period. For The Inklings, especially Charles Williams and J. R. R. Tolkien, Arthuriana material was a way of combating the destructive and reductive patterns of their late modern context.       

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{ "product": {"id":4668932063295,"title":"Volume 142","handle":"mh-142-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 142\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hauerwas\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSTANLEY HAUERWAS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on writing letters to his godson about the \u003cstrong\u003evirtues\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#alleman\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePERRY L. GLANZER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"#alleman\"\u003e and \u003cstrong\u003eNATHAN F. ALLEMAN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the fragmentation of \u003cstrong\u003emodern higher\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003cstrong\u003eeducation\u003c\/strong\u003e and why we need theology to unify universities\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"#bishop\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJEFFREY BISHOP\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003emodern medicine\u003c\/strong\u003e shapes an inadequate understanding of the human body\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#jacobs\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eALAN JACOBS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003econtemporary communications media\u003c\/strong\u003e discourage charitable thinking\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"#schindler\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eD. C. SCHINDLER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the diabolical nature of the \u003cstrong\u003emodern understanding of freedom\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"#wright\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMARIANNE WRIGHT\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how the gospel comes through in the writings of \u003cstrong\u003eGeorge MacDonald\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-142-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-142-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hauerwas\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eStanley Hauerwas\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Faith, hope, and love were seen as the theological virtues and people got the idea through later interpretation that you had the natural virtues as far as they would go and you kind of put frosting on them with faith, hope, and love. But Aquinas was very clear that charity is the form of all the virtues. So charity-formed temperance is not the same as natural temperance.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Stanley Hauerwas, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Character of Virtue: Letters to a Godson\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eTheologian and ethicist Stanley Hauerwas reflects on being a godparent and the responsibility to cultivate and talk about Christian virtue. In his collection of letters to his godson, Hauerwas goes through many of the natural virtues and correlates them to different developmental stages in a child’s life, emphasizing the importance of the body’s role in moral formation.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"alleman\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003ePerry L. Glanzer and Nathan F. Alleman\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The story that we’re trying to tell . . . is really a story of a missed opportunity. The emergence of higher education in the university where theology had this role and was displaced to a kind of a specialization rather than seeing it as integral to everything that was happening. And then we look at ‘what’s the contemporary price that we’re paying for that missed opportunity?’”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Nathan F. Alleman, co-author of \u003c\/em\u003eRestoring the Soul of the University: Unifying Christian Education in a Fragmented Age\u003cem\u003e (InterVarsity Press, 2017)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eEducators Perry L. Glanzer and Nathan F. Alleman talk about how higher education became so fragmented and how most educational institutions are operating within a “less-than-human” vision of curricular and co-curricular efforts. In order to reanimate the soul of the university, Glanzer and Alleman argue, educational institutions need to return to theology — the study and worship of God — as the ordering principle that can bring unity back to the university.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"bishop\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJeffrey Bishop\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The students would have to go up to the person, introduce himself or herself to the model, and ask her or his permission to\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e‘palpate liver,’\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003efor example. And so they suddenly have to learn that this body might recoil from pain or cold hands or from pushing a little too deeply, or from something going on in that body . . . and so suddenly they have to learn that in a social context.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jeffrey Bishop, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying\u003cem\u003e (University of Notre Dame Press, 2011)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eDoes medicine have to be reductionistic? In this interview, medical doctor and health care ethicist Jeffrey Bishop reflects on how the practices of the anatomy lab shape our understanding of the body in unhelpful and unrealistic ways. Bishop recounts how he came to feel uneasy about the ways in which medical education achieves certain standards of knowing while bypassing the standards of knowing actually needed when practicing medicine, often by treating the body as a dead object. As a corrective, Bishop wants to recover the question of what bodies\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eare\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cem\u003e:\u003c\/em\u003e a person and organism mystically integrated into a whole. Bishop wants to investigate a different way of approaching medicine that isn’t scientistic, but takes into account the mysteriously interactive capacities of human persons.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"jacobs\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAlan Jacobs\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“Each of us individually can’t know what we need to know about every issue. That means we have to trust other people to help and guide us and inform us, because we just don’t have the cognitive energy to be able to do this.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Alan Jacobs, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eHow to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Currency, 2017)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eFrequent guest of the \u003cstrong\u003eMARS HILL AUDIO\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eJournal\u003c\/em\u003e Alan Jacobs joins us to discuss some principles he’s compiled to help us think well (and charitably) in our cultural context. Jacobs warns that we need to be attentive to the ways technology and social media displace previously fixed communities and how these new ways of communicating alter how we respond to different ideas and people. Martin Buber said that he allowed a new idea to gestate for nine months before baring it before the world; Jacobs asks that we wait for five minutes. Unfortunately, many people do not realize to what extent thinking is determined and helped by communities and individual narratives. We cannot think and make decisions without the help of others and without the passage of time.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"schindler\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eD. C. Schindler\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Human freedom actually begins beyond us. It draws on the attractive power of Goodness and Beauty and Truth, ultimately, and it wells up in one. So when we make our choices it’s fruit being born in us of a movement that begins more profoundly than our deliberate intentions.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— D. C. Schindler, author of \u003c\/em\u003eFreedom From Reality: The Diabolical Character of Modern Liberty\u003cem\u003e (University of Notre Dame Press, 2017)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003ePhilosopher D. C. Schindler began thinking about the nature of freedom as a result of his efforts to understand the transcendentals Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. Schindler identifies the “anthropological correlates” to the transcendentals as Reason, Freedom, and Love. If human freedom is most closely tied to goodness, what does it mean for man to be free? And does our modern understanding of freedom concur or conflict with man’s participation in Goodness? In this interview, Schindler contrasts the classical and Christian understanding of freedom with the modern understanding of freedom, and explains how John Locke, unlike his contemporaries, was able to popularize the revolutionary notions of freedom that some philosophers were endorsing during the early modern period.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"wright\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMarianne Wright\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“You’ll be reading and suddenly you’ll hit a sentence that just knocks you over the head that can be extracted, and . . . some of these very short one or two sentence passages are things that I’ve thought about for weeks after reading them. I think it’s possible to get a lot of the value out of MacDonald just with those short excerpts.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Marianne Wright, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eThe Gospel in George MacDonald: Selections from His Novels, Fairy Tales, and Spiritual Writings\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Plough Publishing House, 2016)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eBruderhof community member and editor with Plough Publishing Marianne Wright joins us to talk about how reading George MacDonald (as G. K. Chesterton put it) is like “picking jewels out of a rather irregular setting.” Like his Victorian contemporaries, MacDonald’s output was expansive, but even his greatest admirer, C. S. Lewis was quick to say that “few of MacDonald’s novels were good and none were very good.” Despite these faults, there are gems worth encountering and even worth digging for in MacDonald’s writings, namely, what Lewis called MacDonald’s “mythopoeic genius.” Fortunately for contemporary readers, Marianne Wright, like her predecessor C. S. Lewis, has compiled an anthology of excerpts that draws from MacDonald’s sermons, essays, novels, and fairy tales.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-06-23T13:57:03-04:00","created_at":"2020-06-23T14:10:04-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":[],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":32626698977343,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-142-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 142","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-142.jpg?v=1605032917","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hauerwas.png?v=1605032917","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/GlanzerAlleman.png?v=1605032917","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bishop.png?v=1605032917","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jacobs.png?v=1605032917","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Schindler_64866832-6bf5-4da6-b1f3-e9c72ed34691.png?v=1605032917","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Wright.png?v=1605032917"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-142.jpg?v=1605032917","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7797997502527,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-142.jpg?v=1605032917"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-142.jpg?v=1605032917","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":7304819900479,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.638,"height":550,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hauerwas.png?v=1605032917"},"aspect_ratio":0.638,"height":550,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hauerwas.png?v=1605032917","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7304819867711,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.681,"height":518,"width":353,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/GlanzerAlleman.png?v=1605032917"},"aspect_ratio":0.681,"height":518,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/GlanzerAlleman.png?v=1605032917","width":353},{"alt":null,"id":7304819834943,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":518,"width":352,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bishop.png?v=1605032917"},"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":518,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Bishop.png?v=1605032917","width":352},{"alt":null,"id":7304819933247,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.769,"height":458,"width":352,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jacobs.png?v=1605032917"},"aspect_ratio":0.769,"height":458,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Jacobs.png?v=1605032917","width":352},{"alt":null,"id":7304819966015,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.641,"height":548,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Schindler_64866832-6bf5-4da6-b1f3-e9c72ed34691.png?v=1605032917"},"aspect_ratio":0.641,"height":548,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Schindler_64866832-6bf5-4da6-b1f3-e9c72ed34691.png?v=1605032917","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7304819998783,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.679,"height":517,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Wright.png?v=1605032917"},"aspect_ratio":0.679,"height":517,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Wright.png?v=1605032917","width":351}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 142\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hauerwas\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSTANLEY HAUERWAS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on writing letters to his godson about the \u003cstrong\u003evirtues\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#alleman\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003ePERRY L. GLANZER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"#alleman\"\u003e and \u003cstrong\u003eNATHAN F. ALLEMAN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the fragmentation of \u003cstrong\u003emodern higher\u003c\/strong\u003e \u003cstrong\u003eeducation\u003c\/strong\u003e and why we need theology to unify universities\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"#bishop\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJEFFREY BISHOP\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003emodern medicine\u003c\/strong\u003e shapes an inadequate understanding of the human body\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#jacobs\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eALAN JACOBS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003econtemporary communications media\u003c\/strong\u003e discourage charitable thinking\u003cbr\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"#schindler\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eD. C. SCHINDLER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the diabolical nature of the \u003cstrong\u003emodern understanding of freedom\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e• \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"#wright\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMARIANNE WRIGHT\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how the gospel comes through in the writings of \u003cstrong\u003eGeorge MacDonald\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/volume-142-cd-edition\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-142-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hauerwas\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eStanley Hauerwas\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Faith, hope, and love were seen as the theological virtues and people got the idea through later interpretation that you had the natural virtues as far as they would go and you kind of put frosting on them with faith, hope, and love. But Aquinas was very clear that charity is the form of all the virtues. So charity-formed temperance is not the same as natural temperance.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Stanley Hauerwas, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Character of Virtue: Letters to a Godson\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2018)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eTheologian and ethicist Stanley Hauerwas reflects on being a godparent and the responsibility to cultivate and talk about Christian virtue. In his collection of letters to his godson, Hauerwas goes through many of the natural virtues and correlates them to different developmental stages in a child’s life, emphasizing the importance of the body’s role in moral formation.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"alleman\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003ePerry L. Glanzer and Nathan F. Alleman\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The story that we’re trying to tell . . . is really a story of a missed opportunity. The emergence of higher education in the university where theology had this role and was displaced to a kind of a specialization rather than seeing it as integral to everything that was happening. And then we look at ‘what’s the contemporary price that we’re paying for that missed opportunity?’”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Nathan F. Alleman, co-author of \u003c\/em\u003eRestoring the Soul of the University: Unifying Christian Education in a Fragmented Age\u003cem\u003e (InterVarsity Press, 2017)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eEducators Perry L. Glanzer and Nathan F. Alleman talk about how higher education became so fragmented and how most educational institutions are operating within a “less-than-human” vision of curricular and co-curricular efforts. In order to reanimate the soul of the university, Glanzer and Alleman argue, educational institutions need to return to theology — the study and worship of God — as the ordering principle that can bring unity back to the university.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"bishop\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJeffrey Bishop\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“The students would have to go up to the person, introduce himself or herself to the model, and ask her or his permission to\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e‘palpate liver,’\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003efor example. And so they suddenly have to learn that this body might recoil from pain or cold hands or from pushing a little too deeply, or from something going on in that body . . . and so suddenly they have to learn that in a social context.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Jeffrey Bishop, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying\u003cem\u003e (University of Notre Dame Press, 2011)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eDoes medicine have to be reductionistic? In this interview, medical doctor and health care ethicist Jeffrey Bishop reflects on how the practices of the anatomy lab shape our understanding of the body in unhelpful and unrealistic ways. Bishop recounts how he came to feel uneasy about the ways in which medical education achieves certain standards of knowing while bypassing the standards of knowing actually needed when practicing medicine, often by treating the body as a dead object. As a corrective, Bishop wants to recover the question of what bodies\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eare\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cem\u003e:\u003c\/em\u003e a person and organism mystically integrated into a whole. Bishop wants to investigate a different way of approaching medicine that isn’t scientistic, but takes into account the mysteriously interactive capacities of human persons.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"jacobs\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAlan Jacobs\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“Each of us individually can’t know what we need to know about every issue. That means we have to trust other people to help and guide us and inform us, because we just don’t have the cognitive energy to be able to do this.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Alan Jacobs, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eHow to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Currency, 2017)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eFrequent guest of the \u003cstrong\u003eMARS HILL AUDIO\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cem\u003eJournal\u003c\/em\u003e Alan Jacobs joins us to discuss some principles he’s compiled to help us think well (and charitably) in our cultural context. Jacobs warns that we need to be attentive to the ways technology and social media displace previously fixed communities and how these new ways of communicating alter how we respond to different ideas and people. Martin Buber said that he allowed a new idea to gestate for nine months before baring it before the world; Jacobs asks that we wait for five minutes. Unfortunately, many people do not realize to what extent thinking is determined and helped by communities and individual narratives. We cannot think and make decisions without the help of others and without the passage of time.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"schindler\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eD. C. Schindler\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e“Human freedom actually begins beyond us. It draws on the attractive power of Goodness and Beauty and Truth, ultimately, and it wells up in one. So when we make our choices it’s fruit being born in us of a movement that begins more profoundly than our deliberate intentions.”\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— D. C. Schindler, author of \u003c\/em\u003eFreedom From Reality: The Diabolical Character of Modern Liberty\u003cem\u003e (University of Notre Dame Press, 2017)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003ePhilosopher D. C. Schindler began thinking about the nature of freedom as a result of his efforts to understand the transcendentals Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. Schindler identifies the “anthropological correlates” to the transcendentals as Reason, Freedom, and Love. If human freedom is most closely tied to goodness, what does it mean for man to be free? And does our modern understanding of freedom concur or conflict with man’s participation in Goodness? In this interview, Schindler contrasts the classical and Christian understanding of freedom with the modern understanding of freedom, and explains how John Locke, unlike his contemporaries, was able to popularize the revolutionary notions of freedom that some philosophers were endorsing during the early modern period.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"wright\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMarianne Wright\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e“You’ll be reading and suddenly you’ll hit a sentence that just knocks you over the head that can be extracted, and . . . some of these very short one or two sentence passages are things that I’ve thought about for weeks after reading them. I think it’s possible to get a lot of the value out of MacDonald just with those short excerpts.”\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"right\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e— Marianne Wright, author of \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003eThe Gospel in George MacDonald: Selections from His Novels, Fairy Tales, and Spiritual Writings\u003cem\u003e\u003cspan\u003e (Plough Publishing House, 2016)\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp align=\"left\"\u003eBruderhof community member and editor with Plough Publishing Marianne Wright joins us to talk about how reading George MacDonald (as G. K. Chesterton put it) is like “picking jewels out of a rather irregular setting.” Like his Victorian contemporaries, MacDonald’s output was expansive, but even his greatest admirer, C. S. Lewis was quick to say that “few of MacDonald’s novels were good and none were very good.” Despite these faults, there are gems worth encountering and even worth digging for in MacDonald’s writings, namely, what Lewis called MacDonald’s “mythopoeic genius.” Fortunately for contemporary readers, Marianne Wright, like her predecessor C. S. Lewis, has compiled an anthology of excerpts that draws from MacDonald’s sermons, essays, novels, and fairy tales.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2019-02-11 12:19:03" } }
Volume 142

Guests on Volume 142

• STANLEY HAUERWAS on writing letters to his godson about the virtues
• PERRY L. GLANZER and NATHAN F. ALLEMAN on the fragmentation of modern higher education and why we need theology to unify universities
• JEFFREY BISHOP on how modern medicine shapes an inadequate understanding of the human body
• ALAN JACOBS on how contemporary communications media discourage charitable thinking
• D. C. SCHINDLER on the diabolical nature of the modern understanding of freedom
• MARIANNE WRIGHT on how the gospel comes through in the writings of George MacDonald

This Volume is also available on CD

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.

Stanley Hauerwas

“Faith, hope, and love were seen as the theological virtues and people got the idea through later interpretation that you had the natural virtues as far as they would go and you kind of put frosting on them with faith, hope, and love. But Aquinas was very clear that charity is the form of all the virtues. So charity-formed temperance is not the same as natural temperance.”

— Stanley Hauerwas, author of The Character of Virtue: Letters to a Godson (Eerdmans, 2018)

Theologian and ethicist Stanley Hauerwas reflects on being a godparent and the responsibility to cultivate and talk about Christian virtue. In his collection of letters to his godson, Hauerwas goes through many of the natural virtues and correlates them to different developmental stages in a child’s life, emphasizing the importance of the body’s role in moral formation.       

•     •     •

Perry L. Glanzer and Nathan F. Alleman

“The story that we’re trying to tell . . . is really a story of a missed opportunity. The emergence of higher education in the university where theology had this role and was displaced to a kind of a specialization rather than seeing it as integral to everything that was happening. And then we look at ‘what’s the contemporary price that we’re paying for that missed opportunity?’”

— Nathan F. Alleman, co-author of Restoring the Soul of the University: Unifying Christian Education in a Fragmented Age (InterVarsity Press, 2017)

Educators Perry L. Glanzer and Nathan F. Alleman talk about how higher education became so fragmented and how most educational institutions are operating within a “less-than-human” vision of curricular and co-curricular efforts. In order to reanimate the soul of the university, Glanzer and Alleman argue, educational institutions need to return to theology — the study and worship of God — as the ordering principle that can bring unity back to the university.       

•     •     •

Jeffrey Bishop

“The students would have to go up to the person, introduce himself or herself to the model, and ask her or his permission to ‘palpate liver,’ for example. And so they suddenly have to learn that this body might recoil from pain or cold hands or from pushing a little too deeply, or from something going on in that body . . . and so suddenly they have to learn that in a social context.”

— Jeffrey Bishop, author of The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying (University of Notre Dame Press, 2011)

Does medicine have to be reductionistic? In this interview, medical doctor and health care ethicist Jeffrey Bishop reflects on how the practices of the anatomy lab shape our understanding of the body in unhelpful and unrealistic ways. Bishop recounts how he came to feel uneasy about the ways in which medical education achieves certain standards of knowing while bypassing the standards of knowing actually needed when practicing medicine, often by treating the body as a dead object. As a corrective, Bishop wants to recover the question of what bodies are: a person and organism mystically integrated into a whole. Bishop wants to investigate a different way of approaching medicine that isn’t scientistic, but takes into account the mysteriously interactive capacities of human persons.       

•     •     •

Alan Jacobs

“Each of us individually can’t know what we need to know about every issue. That means we have to trust other people to help and guide us and inform us, because we just don’t have the cognitive energy to be able to do this.”

— Alan Jacobs, author of How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds (Currency, 2017)

Frequent guest of the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal Alan Jacobs joins us to discuss some principles he’s compiled to help us think well (and charitably) in our cultural context. Jacobs warns that we need to be attentive to the ways technology and social media displace previously fixed communities and how these new ways of communicating alter how we respond to different ideas and people. Martin Buber said that he allowed a new idea to gestate for nine months before baring it before the world; Jacobs asks that we wait for five minutes. Unfortunately, many people do not realize to what extent thinking is determined and helped by communities and individual narratives. We cannot think and make decisions without the help of others and without the passage of time.       

•     •     •

D. C. Schindler

“Human freedom actually begins beyond us. It draws on the attractive power of Goodness and Beauty and Truth, ultimately, and it wells up in one. So when we make our choices it’s fruit being born in us of a movement that begins more profoundly than our deliberate intentions.”

— D. C. Schindler, author of Freedom From Reality: The Diabolical Character of Modern Liberty (University of Notre Dame Press, 2017)

Philosopher D. C. Schindler began thinking about the nature of freedom as a result of his efforts to understand the transcendentals Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. Schindler identifies the “anthropological correlates” to the transcendentals as Reason, Freedom, and Love. If human freedom is most closely tied to goodness, what does it mean for man to be free? And does our modern understanding of freedom concur or conflict with man’s participation in Goodness? In this interview, Schindler contrasts the classical and Christian understanding of freedom with the modern understanding of freedom, and explains how John Locke, unlike his contemporaries, was able to popularize the revolutionary notions of freedom that some philosophers were endorsing during the early modern period.       

•     •     •

Marianne Wright

“You’ll be reading and suddenly you’ll hit a sentence that just knocks you over the head that can be extracted, and . . . some of these very short one or two sentence passages are things that I’ve thought about for weeks after reading them. I think it’s possible to get a lot of the value out of MacDonald just with those short excerpts.”

— Marianne Wright, author of The Gospel in George MacDonald: Selections from His Novels, Fairy Tales, and Spiritual Writings (Plough Publishing House, 2016)

Bruderhof community member and editor with Plough Publishing Marianne Wright joins us to talk about how reading George MacDonald (as G. K. Chesterton put it) is like “picking jewels out of a rather irregular setting.” Like his Victorian contemporaries, MacDonald’s output was expansive, but even his greatest admirer, C. S. Lewis was quick to say that “few of MacDonald’s novels were good and none were very good.” Despite these faults, there are gems worth encountering and even worth digging for in MacDonald’s writings, namely, what Lewis called MacDonald’s “mythopoeic genius.” Fortunately for contemporary readers, Marianne Wright, like her predecessor C. S. Lewis, has compiled an anthology of excerpts that draws from MacDonald’s sermons, essays, novels, and fairy tales.       

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{ "product": {"id":4667071332415,"title":"Volume 99","handle":"mh-99-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 99\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mcentyre\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMARILYN CHANDLER McENTYRE\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003eabuse of language creates distrust\u003c\/strong\u003e in the power of words and on how we can be better stewards of the gift of language\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#rahe\"\u003ePAUL A. RAHE\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on the heresy of progressivism, which abandons vital convictions about human nature and political order and invites the advent of “\u003cstrong\u003esoft despotism\u003c\/strong\u003e”\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#nolan\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJAMES L. NOLAN, JR.\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how European countries have adopted the American model of \u003cstrong\u003eproblem-solving courts\u003c\/strong\u003e (and what they also get in the bargain)\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#cherlin\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eANDREW J. CHERLIN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on why the twin American commitments to \u003cstrong\u003emarriage\u003c\/strong\u003e and to \u003cstrong\u003eexpressive individualism\u003c\/strong\u003e hurt families\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#keuhne\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDALE KEUHNE\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eon the faulty assumption that intimate relationships demand sexual involvement, and on how the essentially \u003cstrong\u003erelational nature of the Gospel\u003c\/strong\u003e is ignored\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#milbank\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eALISON MILBANK\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how the fantasy writings of \u003cstrong\u003eG. K. Chesterton\u003c\/strong\u003e and \u003cstrong\u003eJ. R. R. Tolkien\u003c\/strong\u003e are intended to reconnect readers with reality\u003cbr\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/products\/mh-99-cd\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-099-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mcentyre\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMarilyn Chandler McEntyre\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Part of the church’s call is to be countercultural and right now the word of proclamation and even the word of admonition is a countercultural act. And to assemble people, to see each other face to face instead of through the medium of a screen is becoming countercultural as we have a generation coming up who text each other from across the hall. . . . I think that the gathering and the conversation that can only happen in the Church needs to be a preservation issue.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, author of \u003c\/em\u003eCaring for Words in a Culture of Lies\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMarilyn Chandler McEntyre discusses the complex ecosystem of language — both spoken and written — and how the health of our languages affects our thoughts, our relationships, and our capacities for conversation, prayer, and contemplation. While a well-turned phrase and a facility for eloquent argument may be viewed as a dangerous form of social power, McEntyre argues that anti-intellectualism and anti-elitism are poor defenses against such abuses through language. Instead, McEntyre proposes that we should foster habits of stewardship and preservation which seek to honor language by allowing ourselves to be addressed by it, to pause around it, and to dwell in it, rather than commanding and wielding our words as weapons.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"rahe\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003ePaul A. Rahe\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"The problem was: can you have liberty in a large territory, say the size of the United States? And the initial answer that Montesquieu offers is 'No, you cannot' because in a large territory there are a thousand things that have to be dealt with, there are always emergencies. This leads to a concentration of power in the hands of the executive. Montesquieu suggested, however, that there were two ways that you could sustain liberty on an extended territory.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Paul A. Rahe, author of \u003c\/em\u003eSoft Despotism, Democracy's Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect\u003cem\u003e (Yale University Press, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePaul Rahe locates a significant shift in attitudes concerning political governance that developed under the influence of nineteenth-century Hegelian historical progressivism. In contrast to what Rahe calls “the heresy of progressivism,” political philosophers prior to Hegel often recognized that throughout history, despotism had been the normal form of government and that modes of political liberty were rare. For this reason, eighteenth-century political philosophers sought methods for separating powers according to federal and state jurisdictions, various functioning branches, and according to the principles of scale and the character of localized lands.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"nolan\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJames L. Nolan, Jr.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"In the U. S., the courts are characterized by enthusiasm, boldness and pragmatism; and the other countries' are characterized by deliberation, moderation and restraint.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— James L. Nolan, Jr., author of \u003c\/em\u003eLegal Accents, Legal Borrowing: The International Problem-Solving Court Movement\u003cem\u003e (Princeton University Press, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn his book \u003cem\u003eLegal Accents, Legal Borrowing\u003c\/em\u003e, sociologist James Nolan compares the attitudes of U.S. judicial courts with those from four other English speaking court systems in Canada, England, Scotland, and Australia. Historically, Nolan comments, court systems and their judges have not been concerned with solving the personal problems of offenders, but rather with the role of adjudicating. One factor leading to this shift in judiciary role is a growing sense of futility felt among judges who see offenders cycle through their courts repeatedly. However, Nolan questions the wisdom of redirecting resources to refashion the criminal court systems at the expense of rebuilding institutions that have typically assumed responsibility for solving personal problems. Nolan attributes the American reorientation of the judiciary role to American cultural values such as pragmatism, entrepreneurial skills, charisma, and therapeutic individualism. While the European court systems are much more modest and restrained about their expectations from their judicial branches, they are, nonetheless, sympathetic to the idea of a problem-solving court. Nolan offers the reminder, however, that legal institutions are cultural products as well and that to adopt an institution as radical as the problem-solving courts may be to embrace many more American cultural assumptions than the European courts are comfortable with.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"cherlin\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAndrew Cherlin\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"I think Americans have two conflicting values in their heads about marriage. On the one hand, they really want to be married. We have one of the highest marriage rates of any country. On the other hand, they think of their marriages in a very personal sense. Am I getting what I need? Am I developing enough as a person in my marriage? And if the answer is no, they feel justified in leaving.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Andrew Cherlin, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Marriage-Go-Round: The State of Marriage and the Family in America Today\u003cem\u003e (Knopf, 2009) \u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSociologist Andrew Cherlin identifies a surprising disparity between American divorce rates and European divorce rates. Despite widespread religious sentiments among Americans, American marriages and cohabiting partnerships seem to be more fragile than their secular European counterparts. Cherlin locates a correlation between American divorce rates and American religion as taught in the flourishing mega-churches, in which people are encouraged to seek personal growth and fulfillment. Cherlin notes that while some European countries, such as Spain and Italy, are highly religious and other European countries, such as those in Scandinavia, are highly individualistic, the United States is the only country where one finds both a strong value on religion and a strong value on individualistic ways of thinking.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"keuhne\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eDale Keuhne\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"But what I realized was that this idea that sexuality was necessary for human fulfillment was something that comes mostly from the sexual revolution in the 60's, and until then that assumption was not part of Western society, and as a result, not only was same-sex marriage off the table, but the idea of fulfillment and sexuality being connected wasn't part of the equation.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Dale Kuehne, author of \u003c\/em\u003eSex and the iWorld: Rethinking Relationship Beyond an Age of Individualism\u003cem\u003e (Baker, 2009) \u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eDale Kuehne discusses the relatively recent view that deep personal and relational fulfillment requires sexual intimacy. Though sexual deviancy has existed throughout history, societies that have been defined less by individualism and more by issues of public and communal virtue, viewed sex as an appetite that should be restrained, typically within marriage between a man and a woman. For instance, contrary to contemporary assumptions, in which sexual intimacy is requisite for the deepest form of human fulfillment, the ancient Greeks viewed male to male friendship as the highest form of relationship because it was seen as the most rational and least enslaved to the sexual appetite. Kuehne argues that individualism is detrimental to human relationships and to our capacity to imagine intimacy because it undermines more complex, communal structures for relationships.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"milbank\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAlison Milbank\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Chesterton saw that in order to restore the real, you did have to take a journey away from it.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Alison Milbank, author of \u003c\/em\u003eChesterton and Tolkien as Theologians: The Fantasy of the Real\u003cem\u003e (T \u0026amp; T Clark, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTheologian Alison Milbank discusses the influence that G. K. Chesterton had upon J. R. R. Tolkien. Both writers saw fantasy as an escape from reality, but also a journey that would ultimately restore one’s perception of what was truly real. Tolkien, in particular, wanted his fantasies to enable readers to see the objects of this world as meaningful things apart from ourselves, rather than dead objects subject entirely to our manipulation and control. Milbank comments that Tolkien’s fantasies reflect a desire to return to a medieval view in which objects participate in reality as we participate in reality, with their own kind of form and integrity. For both authors, the things we perceive in the world present themselves as intentional, personal, and given.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-06-22T09:23:52-04:00","created_at":"2020-06-22T09:23:54-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["Alison Milbank","Andrew J. Cherlin","Dale Kuehne","Fantasy fiction","G. K. Chesterton","Human nature","Individualism","J. R. R. Tolkien","James L. Nolan","Language","Law","Marilyn Chandler McEntyre","Marriage","Myth","Paul A. Rahe","Politics","Sexuality"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":32621107347519,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"MH-99-M","requires_shipping":false,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Volume 99","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-99.jpg?v=1605286483","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/McEntyre_21276b67-c57c-469e-9853-79dd00d22871.png?v=1605286483","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Nolan_e680f3fc-3c08-4d2b-932b-a00a42e1bf83.png?v=1605286483","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Rahe.png?v=1605286483","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Cherlin.png?v=1605286483","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Kuehne.png?v=1605286483","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Milbank.png?v=1605286483"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-99.jpg?v=1605286483","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7814910083135,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-99.jpg?v=1605286483"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-99.jpg?v=1605286483","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":7407703326783,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.678,"height":518,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/McEntyre_21276b67-c57c-469e-9853-79dd00d22871.png?v=1605286483"},"aspect_ratio":0.678,"height":518,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/McEntyre_21276b67-c57c-469e-9853-79dd00d22871.png?v=1605286483","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7407703392319,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.676,"height":521,"width":352,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Nolan_e680f3fc-3c08-4d2b-932b-a00a42e1bf83.png?v=1605286483"},"aspect_ratio":0.676,"height":521,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Nolan_e680f3fc-3c08-4d2b-932b-a00a42e1bf83.png?v=1605286483","width":352},{"alt":null,"id":7407703425087,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.675,"height":520,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Rahe.png?v=1605286483"},"aspect_ratio":0.675,"height":520,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Rahe.png?v=1605286483","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7407703261247,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.664,"height":530,"width":352,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Cherlin.png?v=1605286483"},"aspect_ratio":0.664,"height":530,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Cherlin.png?v=1605286483","width":352},{"alt":null,"id":7407703294015,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.678,"height":518,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Kuehne.png?v=1605286483"},"aspect_ratio":0.678,"height":518,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Kuehne.png?v=1605286483","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7407703359551,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.683,"height":514,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Milbank.png?v=1605286483"},"aspect_ratio":0.683,"height":514,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Milbank.png?v=1605286483","width":351}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 99\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#mcentyre\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMARILYN CHANDLER McENTYRE\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003eabuse of language creates distrust\u003c\/strong\u003e in the power of words and on how we can be better stewards of the gift of language\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#rahe\"\u003ePAUL A. RAHE\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on the heresy of progressivism, which abandons vital convictions about human nature and political order and invites the advent of “\u003cstrong\u003esoft despotism\u003c\/strong\u003e”\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#nolan\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJAMES L. NOLAN, JR.\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how European countries have adopted the American model of \u003cstrong\u003eproblem-solving courts\u003c\/strong\u003e (and what they also get in the bargain)\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#cherlin\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eANDREW J. CHERLIN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on why the twin American commitments to \u003cstrong\u003emarriage\u003c\/strong\u003e and to \u003cstrong\u003eexpressive individualism\u003c\/strong\u003e hurt families\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#keuhne\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDALE KEUHNE\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e \u003cspan data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003eon the faulty assumption that intimate relationships demand sexual involvement, and on how the essentially \u003cstrong\u003erelational nature of the Gospel\u003c\/strong\u003e is ignored\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#milbank\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eALISON MILBANK\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how the fantasy writings of \u003cstrong\u003eG. K. Chesterton\u003c\/strong\u003e and \u003cstrong\u003eJ. R. R. Tolkien\u003c\/strong\u003e are intended to reconnect readers with reality\u003cbr\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/marshillaudio.org\/products\/mh-99-cd\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-099-Contents.pdf?v=1641757634\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"mcentyre\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMarilyn Chandler McEntyre\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Part of the church’s call is to be countercultural and right now the word of proclamation and even the word of admonition is a countercultural act. And to assemble people, to see each other face to face instead of through the medium of a screen is becoming countercultural as we have a generation coming up who text each other from across the hall. . . . I think that the gathering and the conversation that can only happen in the Church needs to be a preservation issue.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, author of \u003c\/em\u003eCaring for Words in a Culture of Lies\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMarilyn Chandler McEntyre discusses the complex ecosystem of language — both spoken and written — and how the health of our languages affects our thoughts, our relationships, and our capacities for conversation, prayer, and contemplation. While a well-turned phrase and a facility for eloquent argument may be viewed as a dangerous form of social power, McEntyre argues that anti-intellectualism and anti-elitism are poor defenses against such abuses through language. Instead, McEntyre proposes that we should foster habits of stewardship and preservation which seek to honor language by allowing ourselves to be addressed by it, to pause around it, and to dwell in it, rather than commanding and wielding our words as weapons.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"rahe\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003ePaul A. Rahe\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"The problem was: can you have liberty in a large territory, say the size of the United States? And the initial answer that Montesquieu offers is 'No, you cannot' because in a large territory there are a thousand things that have to be dealt with, there are always emergencies. This leads to a concentration of power in the hands of the executive. Montesquieu suggested, however, that there were two ways that you could sustain liberty on an extended territory.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Paul A. Rahe, author of \u003c\/em\u003eSoft Despotism, Democracy's Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect\u003cem\u003e (Yale University Press, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePaul Rahe locates a significant shift in attitudes concerning political governance that developed under the influence of nineteenth-century Hegelian historical progressivism. In contrast to what Rahe calls “the heresy of progressivism,” political philosophers prior to Hegel often recognized that throughout history, despotism had been the normal form of government and that modes of political liberty were rare. For this reason, eighteenth-century political philosophers sought methods for separating powers according to federal and state jurisdictions, various functioning branches, and according to the principles of scale and the character of localized lands.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"nolan\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJames L. Nolan, Jr.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"In the U. S., the courts are characterized by enthusiasm, boldness and pragmatism; and the other countries' are characterized by deliberation, moderation and restraint.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— James L. Nolan, Jr., author of \u003c\/em\u003eLegal Accents, Legal Borrowing: The International Problem-Solving Court Movement\u003cem\u003e (Princeton University Press, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eIn his book \u003cem\u003eLegal Accents, Legal Borrowing\u003c\/em\u003e, sociologist James Nolan compares the attitudes of U.S. judicial courts with those from four other English speaking court systems in Canada, England, Scotland, and Australia. Historically, Nolan comments, court systems and their judges have not been concerned with solving the personal problems of offenders, but rather with the role of adjudicating. One factor leading to this shift in judiciary role is a growing sense of futility felt among judges who see offenders cycle through their courts repeatedly. However, Nolan questions the wisdom of redirecting resources to refashion the criminal court systems at the expense of rebuilding institutions that have typically assumed responsibility for solving personal problems. Nolan attributes the American reorientation of the judiciary role to American cultural values such as pragmatism, entrepreneurial skills, charisma, and therapeutic individualism. While the European court systems are much more modest and restrained about their expectations from their judicial branches, they are, nonetheless, sympathetic to the idea of a problem-solving court. Nolan offers the reminder, however, that legal institutions are cultural products as well and that to adopt an institution as radical as the problem-solving courts may be to embrace many more American cultural assumptions than the European courts are comfortable with.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"cherlin\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAndrew Cherlin\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"I think Americans have two conflicting values in their heads about marriage. On the one hand, they really want to be married. We have one of the highest marriage rates of any country. On the other hand, they think of their marriages in a very personal sense. Am I getting what I need? Am I developing enough as a person in my marriage? And if the answer is no, they feel justified in leaving.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Andrew Cherlin, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Marriage-Go-Round: The State of Marriage and the Family in America Today\u003cem\u003e (Knopf, 2009) \u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eSociologist Andrew Cherlin identifies a surprising disparity between American divorce rates and European divorce rates. Despite widespread religious sentiments among Americans, American marriages and cohabiting partnerships seem to be more fragile than their secular European counterparts. Cherlin locates a correlation between American divorce rates and American religion as taught in the flourishing mega-churches, in which people are encouraged to seek personal growth and fulfillment. Cherlin notes that while some European countries, such as Spain and Italy, are highly religious and other European countries, such as those in Scandinavia, are highly individualistic, the United States is the only country where one finds both a strong value on religion and a strong value on individualistic ways of thinking.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"keuhne\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eDale Keuhne\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"But what I realized was that this idea that sexuality was necessary for human fulfillment was something that comes mostly from the sexual revolution in the 60's, and until then that assumption was not part of Western society, and as a result, not only was same-sex marriage off the table, but the idea of fulfillment and sexuality being connected wasn't part of the equation.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Dale Kuehne, author of \u003c\/em\u003eSex and the iWorld: Rethinking Relationship Beyond an Age of Individualism\u003cem\u003e (Baker, 2009) \u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eDale Kuehne discusses the relatively recent view that deep personal and relational fulfillment requires sexual intimacy. Though sexual deviancy has existed throughout history, societies that have been defined less by individualism and more by issues of public and communal virtue, viewed sex as an appetite that should be restrained, typically within marriage between a man and a woman. For instance, contrary to contemporary assumptions, in which sexual intimacy is requisite for the deepest form of human fulfillment, the ancient Greeks viewed male to male friendship as the highest form of relationship because it was seen as the most rational and least enslaved to the sexual appetite. Kuehne argues that individualism is detrimental to human relationships and to our capacity to imagine intimacy because it undermines more complex, communal structures for relationships.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"milbank\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eAlison Milbank\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Chesterton saw that in order to restore the real, you did have to take a journey away from it.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e— Alison Milbank, author of \u003c\/em\u003eChesterton and Tolkien as Theologians: The Fantasy of the Real\u003cem\u003e (T \u0026amp; T Clark, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTheologian Alison Milbank discusses the influence that G. K. Chesterton had upon J. R. R. Tolkien. Both writers saw fantasy as an escape from reality, but also a journey that would ultimately restore one’s perception of what was truly real. Tolkien, in particular, wanted his fantasies to enable readers to see the objects of this world as meaningful things apart from ourselves, rather than dead objects subject entirely to our manipulation and control. Milbank comments that Tolkien’s fantasies reflect a desire to return to a medieval view in which objects participate in reality as we participate in reality, with their own kind of form and integrity. For both authors, the things we perceive in the world present themselves as intentional, personal, and given.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2009-11-01 14:49:06" } }
Volume 99

Guests on Volume 99

MARILYN CHANDLER McENTYRE on how the abuse of language creates distrust in the power of words and on how we can be better stewards of the gift of language
PAUL A. RAHE on the heresy of progressivism, which abandons vital convictions about human nature and political order and invites the advent of “soft despotism
JAMES L. NOLAN, JR. on how European countries have adopted the American model of problem-solving courts (and what they also get in the bargain)
ANDREW J. CHERLIN on why the twin American commitments to marriage and to expressive individualism hurt families
DALE KEUHNE on the faulty assumption that intimate relationships demand sexual involvement, and on how the essentially relational nature of the Gospel is ignored
ALISON MILBANK on how the fantasy writings of G. K. Chesterton and J. R. R. Tolkien are intended to reconnect readers with reality

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Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.

Marilyn Chandler McEntyre

"Part of the church’s call is to be countercultural and right now the word of proclamation and even the word of admonition is a countercultural act. And to assemble people, to see each other face to face instead of through the medium of a screen is becoming countercultural as we have a generation coming up who text each other from across the hall. . . . I think that the gathering and the conversation that can only happen in the Church needs to be a preservation issue."

— Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, author of Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies (Eerdmans, 2009)

Marilyn Chandler McEntyre discusses the complex ecosystem of language — both spoken and written — and how the health of our languages affects our thoughts, our relationships, and our capacities for conversation, prayer, and contemplation. While a well-turned phrase and a facility for eloquent argument may be viewed as a dangerous form of social power, McEntyre argues that anti-intellectualism and anti-elitism are poor defenses against such abuses through language. Instead, McEntyre proposes that we should foster habits of stewardship and preservation which seek to honor language by allowing ourselves to be addressed by it, to pause around it, and to dwell in it, rather than commanding and wielding our words as weapons.       

•     •     •

Paul A. Rahe

"The problem was: can you have liberty in a large territory, say the size of the United States? And the initial answer that Montesquieu offers is 'No, you cannot' because in a large territory there are a thousand things that have to be dealt with, there are always emergencies. This leads to a concentration of power in the hands of the executive. Montesquieu suggested, however, that there were two ways that you could sustain liberty on an extended territory."

— Paul A. Rahe, author of Soft Despotism, Democracy's Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect (Yale University Press, 2009)

Paul Rahe locates a significant shift in attitudes concerning political governance that developed under the influence of nineteenth-century Hegelian historical progressivism. In contrast to what Rahe calls “the heresy of progressivism,” political philosophers prior to Hegel often recognized that throughout history, despotism had been the normal form of government and that modes of political liberty were rare. For this reason, eighteenth-century political philosophers sought methods for separating powers according to federal and state jurisdictions, various functioning branches, and according to the principles of scale and the character of localized lands.       

•     •     •

James L. Nolan, Jr.

"In the U. S., the courts are characterized by enthusiasm, boldness and pragmatism; and the other countries' are characterized by deliberation, moderation and restraint."

— James L. Nolan, Jr., author of Legal Accents, Legal Borrowing: The International Problem-Solving Court Movement (Princeton University Press, 2009)

In his book Legal Accents, Legal Borrowing, sociologist James Nolan compares the attitudes of U.S. judicial courts with those from four other English speaking court systems in Canada, England, Scotland, and Australia. Historically, Nolan comments, court systems and their judges have not been concerned with solving the personal problems of offenders, but rather with the role of adjudicating. One factor leading to this shift in judiciary role is a growing sense of futility felt among judges who see offenders cycle through their courts repeatedly. However, Nolan questions the wisdom of redirecting resources to refashion the criminal court systems at the expense of rebuilding institutions that have typically assumed responsibility for solving personal problems. Nolan attributes the American reorientation of the judiciary role to American cultural values such as pragmatism, entrepreneurial skills, charisma, and therapeutic individualism. While the European court systems are much more modest and restrained about their expectations from their judicial branches, they are, nonetheless, sympathetic to the idea of a problem-solving court. Nolan offers the reminder, however, that legal institutions are cultural products as well and that to adopt an institution as radical as the problem-solving courts may be to embrace many more American cultural assumptions than the European courts are comfortable with.       

•     •     •

Andrew Cherlin

"I think Americans have two conflicting values in their heads about marriage. On the one hand, they really want to be married. We have one of the highest marriage rates of any country. On the other hand, they think of their marriages in a very personal sense. Am I getting what I need? Am I developing enough as a person in my marriage? And if the answer is no, they feel justified in leaving."

— Andrew Cherlin, author of The Marriage-Go-Round: The State of Marriage and the Family in America Today (Knopf, 2009) 

Sociologist Andrew Cherlin identifies a surprising disparity between American divorce rates and European divorce rates. Despite widespread religious sentiments among Americans, American marriages and cohabiting partnerships seem to be more fragile than their secular European counterparts. Cherlin locates a correlation between American divorce rates and American religion as taught in the flourishing mega-churches, in which people are encouraged to seek personal growth and fulfillment. Cherlin notes that while some European countries, such as Spain and Italy, are highly religious and other European countries, such as those in Scandinavia, are highly individualistic, the United States is the only country where one finds both a strong value on religion and a strong value on individualistic ways of thinking.       

•     •     •

Dale Keuhne

"But what I realized was that this idea that sexuality was necessary for human fulfillment was something that comes mostly from the sexual revolution in the 60's, and until then that assumption was not part of Western society, and as a result, not only was same-sex marriage off the table, but the idea of fulfillment and sexuality being connected wasn't part of the equation."

— Dale Kuehne, author of Sex and the iWorld: Rethinking Relationship Beyond an Age of Individualism (Baker, 2009) 

Dale Kuehne discusses the relatively recent view that deep personal and relational fulfillment requires sexual intimacy. Though sexual deviancy has existed throughout history, societies that have been defined less by individualism and more by issues of public and communal virtue, viewed sex as an appetite that should be restrained, typically within marriage between a man and a woman. For instance, contrary to contemporary assumptions, in which sexual intimacy is requisite for the deepest form of human fulfillment, the ancient Greeks viewed male to male friendship as the highest form of relationship because it was seen as the most rational and least enslaved to the sexual appetite. Kuehne argues that individualism is detrimental to human relationships and to our capacity to imagine intimacy because it undermines more complex, communal structures for relationships.       

•     •     •

Alison Milbank

"Chesterton saw that in order to restore the real, you did have to take a journey away from it."

— Alison Milbank, author of Chesterton and Tolkien as Theologians: The Fantasy of the Real (T & T Clark, 2009)

Theologian Alison Milbank discusses the influence that G. K. Chesterton had upon J. R. R. Tolkien. Both writers saw fantasy as an escape from reality, but also a journey that would ultimately restore one’s perception of what was truly real. Tolkien, in particular, wanted his fantasies to enable readers to see the objects of this world as meaningful things apart from ourselves, rather than dead objects subject entirely to our manipulation and control. Milbank comments that Tolkien’s fantasies reflect a desire to return to a medieval view in which objects participate in reality as we participate in reality, with their own kind of form and integrity. For both authors, the things we perceive in the world present themselves as intentional, personal, and given.       

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{ "product": {"id":4667071299647,"title":"Volume 98","handle":"mh-98-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 98\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hauerwas\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSTANLEY HAUERWAS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the public witness of \u003cstrong\u003eFr. Richard John Neuhaus\u003c\/strong\u003e and on why Neuhaus abandoned his 1960s radicalism to become a leading “theoconservative”\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#forsythe\"\u003eCLARKE FORSYTHE\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on why \u003cstrong\u003eprudence\u003c\/strong\u003e is a lost political virtue and on why and how the pro-life movement needs to broaden its educational efforts\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#meilaender\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eGILBERT MEILAENDER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the necessity of a concept of \u003cstrong\u003ehuman dignity\u003c\/strong\u003e and on why Americans no longer seem able to defend it\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#walker\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJEANNE MURRAY WALKER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how her students learn to understand poetry and on how \u003cstrong\u003emetaphors\u003c\/strong\u003e are at the heart of poetic expression\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#lundin\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eROGER LUNDIN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003edisenchantment of the world\u003c\/strong\u003e led to new forms of doubt and self-expression\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hart\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDAVID BENTLEY HART\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the feeble and confused arguments of the recent crop of outspoken atheists and on how a misunderstanding of the \u003cstrong\u003enature of freedom\u003c\/strong\u003e is at the heart of their revulsion at religion\u003cbr\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/mh-98-cd\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-098-Contents.pdf?v=1641757633\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hauerwas\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eStanley Hauerwas\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"People forget that Richard was very prominent in the protests against [the] Vietnam [War]… and he assumed that when the Supreme Court decision about abortion was delivered, that the allies that he had had in the civil rights campaign and the anti-Vietnam campaign… would be allies against abortion. And he was stunned to discover that they thought the Supreme Court's abortion ruling was just fine, and that they supported it. And I think that's when Richard began to decisively shift his politics. That changed. He was no longer on the left. He was clearly on the right. And he was on the right for the same reasons he had been on the left, namely that's where he found the coalitions necessary to be in support of the dignity of life.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—Stanley Hauerwas\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTheologian Stanley Hauerwas discusses the late Richard John Neuhaus, who passed away on January 8, 2009. Despite their, at times, deep disagreements, they shared a desire to keep the Church from succumbing to forms of cultural accommodation. Hauerwas comments on Neuhaus's extraordinary faith that gave him hope for the country in which he lived, hope that energized his labors of love in the public sphere. He reminds us that Neuhaus was an anti-war and pro-civil rights activist in the 1960s and 70s, and only came to be known as a conservative when abortion became legalized in 1973. It was a shock to Neuhaus that his allies in the anti-war movement and civil rights movement took the pro-choice side. Hauerwas observes that despite Neuhaus's more visible work in politics, Neuhaus had a fundamentally pastoral heart that showed in his personal relationships, his reflections on Scripture, and his pastoral writings.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"forsythe\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eClarke Forsythe\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Back in 1973, the Supreme Court assumed that abortion was safer than childbirth. . . . Today . . . we now know of the five best medically documented risks: heightened risk of pre-term birth, heightened risk of placenta previa, heightened incidence of drug and alcohol abuse, heightened incidence of suicide and psychiatric admission, and fifth, the loss of the protective effect of a first full-term pregnancy against breast cancer.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—Clarke Forsythe, author of \u003c\/em\u003ePolitics for the Greatest Good: The Case for Prudence in the Public Square\u003cem\u003e (InverVarsity Press, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eClarke Forsythe explains the ways the pro-life movement in the United States can more wisely navigate politics in pursuit of its ends. He takes note of the fears and misgivings many people have concerning politics and the possibility of achieving good things without being morally compromising. The idea of compromise, Forsythe believes, is often misunderstood as moral failure in and of itself rather than a mutual concession to reach agreement on a limited good. Prudence, for Forsythe, is key. It requires an understanding of what is good but also the ability to act on that knowledge. He believes that educational efforts concerning pro-life issues should be targeted to the broad swath of \"middle America\" which is neither consistently pro-life nor pro-choice, but lean towards pro-life beliefs. As with slavery in the days of William Wilberforce, many Americans consider abortion to be a sort of \"necessary evil\"; Forsythe believes this sense of an evil's necessity is a key obstacle to reform, but that this obstacle can be overcome by bringing new knowledge into the public debate concerning the health problems and risks associated with abortion that medical science has learned over the past few decades.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"meilaender\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eGilbert Meilaender\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"We remain committed to the equal dignity of persons . . . though it's not clear that we have a rationale any longer for that commitment to the equal personal dignity; historically, I think, the rationale was a religious one. And in public we try to get along without that these days, and I'm not altogether sure we can.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—Gilbert Meilaender, author of \u003c\/em\u003eNeither Beast Nor God: The Dignity of the Human Person\u003cem\u003e (Encounter Books, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMoral philosopher Gilbert Meilaender examines the question of human dignity and its place within political discourse. Because what we believe about human dignity influences what we believe should be done to and for people in society, Meilaender believes people need to be discussing what human dignity is in politics. Meilaender suggests that those in politics who wish to bracket that discussion because it seems to be concerning a religious or metaphysical question are fundamentally mistaken in their desire, not least because, regardless of whether or not they wish to recognize it, the religious or metaphysical question does influence their decision. This is something he saw repeatedly over the course of his membership on the President's Council on Bioethics. Meilaender goes on to describe two distinct ideas concerning human dignity which he believes are at work whenever people use the term; he then describes some of the reasons for confusion in American society concerning the dignity of the human person, including some developments in biotechnology.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"walker\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJeanne Murray Walker\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"If every age allows poems, goes back to the poems, they find new things in them. I think that we just have to face the fact that there is such a thing as mystery. It's joyful, it's playful, it's full of excitement and you have to rest in that and trust in that rather than trusting in some paraphrase.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—Jeanne Murray Walker, author of \u003c\/em\u003eNew Tracks, Night Falling\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePoet Jeanne Murray Walker talks about learning to read poetry. Walker discusses some of the ways she helps students approach and appreciate poetry as the mysteriously meaningful literature it is, rather than as a linguistic cage containing static meaning to be abstracted from the words of the poem. The meaning is rooted in the metaphors in the poetry, which resonate in the imagination and eventually resolve as truth. The segment ends with a reading of selected poems from Walker's new book.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"lundin\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eRoger Lundin\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"It pits a woman with a vast, expansive inner life, filled with desire and a sense of possibility and self-discovery, but she lives in a natural world . . . that doesn't care one whit about her hopes, her dreams. Indeed, the doctor tells her that any hope, any dream, any sense of possibility that she has is simply an illusion.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—Roger Lundin, author of \u003c\/em\u003eBelieving Again: Doubt and Faith in a Secular Age\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eWhat makes Christian belief so implausible to non-believers? In this segment, Roger Lundin discusses his book \u003cem\u003eBelieving Again: Doubt and Faith in a Secular Age\u003c\/em\u003e. Distinctively modern unbelief is defined as a socially accepted and intellectually viable shift that saw faith in God as optional. Beginning in the seventeenth century, the romanticization of the human imagination resulted from the steady disenchantment of the world as rendered by the physical sciences and later the biological sciences. Lundin explains that this world seems increasingly indifferent to or even hostile to the world that human beings imagine, the world that they dream of and desire to live in. As an example of this in literature, he discusses the understanding of inner life and outward realities present in literature such as Kate Chopin’s \u003cem\u003eThe Awakening\u003c\/em\u003e and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s \u003cem\u003eThe Great Gatsby\u003c\/em\u003e. Lundin praises the imaginative possibilities in poetry and literature, but warns against the assumption that we all possess deep imaginations that are more powerful and meaningful than anything we could find in the natural world.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hart\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eDavid Bentley Hart\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"The sort of atheism you get from the current group is so complacent and so lacking in any deep thought that it's sort of the \u003c\/em\u003ePeople \u003cem\u003emagazine approach to atheism, and so it has a certain marketability.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—David Bentley Hart, author of \u003c\/em\u003eAtheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and its Fashionable Enemies\u003cem\u003e (Yale University Press, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eDavid Bentley Hart discusses his book \u003cem\u003eAtheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and Its Fashionable Enemies\u003c\/em\u003e. Hart describes these delusions as a sense that the human race has been emancipated by agents of reason and tolerance. This is popularized atheism's founding myth, he says, and it’s captivating and easy to follow. Hart’s book exposes the falseness of this revisionist and self-serving modern myth in vivid detail. He lists these atheists' three basic arguments: 1) Empirical science is better able to explain existence than theology and metaphysics; 2) There are no rational grounds for belief and therefore it is of its nature contrary to reason; and 3) The history of Christianity is shown to be oppressive and cruel. Hart sees the first two arguments as basic category mistakes, and the third as nothing less than bad historical research. He concludes that the irrational moralism of these atheists has no basis in truth and is fundamentally incoherent.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2020-06-22T09:23:50-04:00","created_at":"2020-06-22T09:23:52-04:00","vendor":"Mars Hill Audio","type":"Journals","tags":["Abortion","Bioethics","Biotechnology","Clarke Forsythe","David Bentley Hart","Education","Gilbert Meilaender","Human dignity","Human nature","Jeanne Murray Walker","Metaphor","Natural law","Poetry","Politics","Politics--Civic involvement","Pro-life movement","Prudence","Richard John Neuhaus","Roger Lundin","Stanley Hauerwas"],"price":900,"price_min":900,"price_max":900,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":32621109084223,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default 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Title"],"price":900,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-98.jpg?v=1605286416","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Neuhaus.png?v=1605286416","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Forsythe.png?v=1605286416","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Meilaender_a22b0bfc-02ff-494b-b65d-efde5bcd74d2.png?v=1605286416","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Walker.png?v=1605286416","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Lundin_b821d911-4ab4-4558-b33d-63331a0ac320.png?v=1605286416","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hart_5aac9f2b-a699-49c6-8a45-5b077a991fd8.png?v=1605286416"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-98.jpg?v=1605286416","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":7814906380351,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"width":1060,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-98.jpg?v=1605286416"},"aspect_ratio":0.669,"height":1585,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/J-98.jpg?v=1605286416","width":1060},{"alt":null,"id":7407976775743,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.674,"height":521,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Neuhaus.png?v=1605286416"},"aspect_ratio":0.674,"height":521,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Neuhaus.png?v=1605286416","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7407976644671,"position":3,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":518,"width":352,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Forsythe.png?v=1605286416"},"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":518,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Forsythe.png?v=1605286416","width":352},{"alt":null,"id":7407976742975,"position":4,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.686,"height":512,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Meilaender_a22b0bfc-02ff-494b-b65d-efde5bcd74d2.png?v=1605286416"},"aspect_ratio":0.686,"height":512,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Meilaender_a22b0bfc-02ff-494b-b65d-efde5bcd74d2.png?v=1605286416","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7407976808511,"position":5,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":518,"width":352,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Walker.png?v=1605286416"},"aspect_ratio":0.68,"height":518,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Walker.png?v=1605286416","width":352},{"alt":null,"id":7407976710207,"position":6,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.679,"height":517,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Lundin_b821d911-4ab4-4558-b33d-63331a0ac320.png?v=1605286416"},"aspect_ratio":0.679,"height":517,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Lundin_b821d911-4ab4-4558-b33d-63331a0ac320.png?v=1605286416","width":351},{"alt":null,"id":7407976677439,"position":7,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.674,"height":521,"width":351,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hart_5aac9f2b-a699-49c6-8a45-5b077a991fd8.png?v=1605286416"},"aspect_ratio":0.674,"height":521,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/products\/Hart_5aac9f2b-a699-49c6-8a45-5b077a991fd8.png?v=1605286416","width":351}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 98\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hauerwas\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSTANLEY HAUERWAS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the public witness of \u003cstrong\u003eFr. Richard John Neuhaus\u003c\/strong\u003e and on why Neuhaus abandoned his 1960s radicalism to become a leading “theoconservative”\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#forsythe\"\u003eCLARKE FORSYTHE\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on why \u003cstrong\u003eprudence\u003c\/strong\u003e is a lost political virtue and on why and how the pro-life movement needs to broaden its educational efforts\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#meilaender\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eGILBERT MEILAENDER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the necessity of a concept of \u003cstrong\u003ehuman dignity\u003c\/strong\u003e and on why Americans no longer seem able to defend it\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#walker\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJEANNE MURRAY WALKER\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how her students learn to understand poetry and on how \u003cstrong\u003emetaphors\u003c\/strong\u003e are at the heart of poetic expression\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#lundin\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eROGER LUNDIN\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how the \u003cstrong\u003edisenchantment of the world\u003c\/strong\u003e led to new forms of doubt and self-expression\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#hart\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDAVID BENTLEY HART\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on the feeble and confused arguments of the recent crop of outspoken atheists and on how a misunderstanding of the \u003cstrong\u003enature of freedom\u003c\/strong\u003e is at the heart of their revulsion at religion\u003cbr\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/mh-98-cd\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-098-Contents.pdf?v=1641757633\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hauerwas\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eStanley Hauerwas\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"People forget that Richard was very prominent in the protests against [the] Vietnam [War]… and he assumed that when the Supreme Court decision about abortion was delivered, that the allies that he had had in the civil rights campaign and the anti-Vietnam campaign… would be allies against abortion. And he was stunned to discover that they thought the Supreme Court's abortion ruling was just fine, and that they supported it. And I think that's when Richard began to decisively shift his politics. That changed. He was no longer on the left. He was clearly on the right. And he was on the right for the same reasons he had been on the left, namely that's where he found the coalitions necessary to be in support of the dignity of life.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—Stanley Hauerwas\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eTheologian Stanley Hauerwas discusses the late Richard John Neuhaus, who passed away on January 8, 2009. Despite their, at times, deep disagreements, they shared a desire to keep the Church from succumbing to forms of cultural accommodation. Hauerwas comments on Neuhaus's extraordinary faith that gave him hope for the country in which he lived, hope that energized his labors of love in the public sphere. He reminds us that Neuhaus was an anti-war and pro-civil rights activist in the 1960s and 70s, and only came to be known as a conservative when abortion became legalized in 1973. It was a shock to Neuhaus that his allies in the anti-war movement and civil rights movement took the pro-choice side. Hauerwas observes that despite Neuhaus's more visible work in politics, Neuhaus had a fundamentally pastoral heart that showed in his personal relationships, his reflections on Scripture, and his pastoral writings.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"forsythe\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eClarke Forsythe\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"Back in 1973, the Supreme Court assumed that abortion was safer than childbirth. . . . Today . . . we now know of the five best medically documented risks: heightened risk of pre-term birth, heightened risk of placenta previa, heightened incidence of drug and alcohol abuse, heightened incidence of suicide and psychiatric admission, and fifth, the loss of the protective effect of a first full-term pregnancy against breast cancer.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—Clarke Forsythe, author of \u003c\/em\u003ePolitics for the Greatest Good: The Case for Prudence in the Public Square\u003cem\u003e (InverVarsity Press, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eClarke Forsythe explains the ways the pro-life movement in the United States can more wisely navigate politics in pursuit of its ends. He takes note of the fears and misgivings many people have concerning politics and the possibility of achieving good things without being morally compromising. The idea of compromise, Forsythe believes, is often misunderstood as moral failure in and of itself rather than a mutual concession to reach agreement on a limited good. Prudence, for Forsythe, is key. It requires an understanding of what is good but also the ability to act on that knowledge. He believes that educational efforts concerning pro-life issues should be targeted to the broad swath of \"middle America\" which is neither consistently pro-life nor pro-choice, but lean towards pro-life beliefs. As with slavery in the days of William Wilberforce, many Americans consider abortion to be a sort of \"necessary evil\"; Forsythe believes this sense of an evil's necessity is a key obstacle to reform, but that this obstacle can be overcome by bringing new knowledge into the public debate concerning the health problems and risks associated with abortion that medical science has learned over the past few decades.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"meilaender\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eGilbert Meilaender\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"We remain committed to the equal dignity of persons . . . though it's not clear that we have a rationale any longer for that commitment to the equal personal dignity; historically, I think, the rationale was a religious one. And in public we try to get along without that these days, and I'm not altogether sure we can.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—Gilbert Meilaender, author of \u003c\/em\u003eNeither Beast Nor God: The Dignity of the Human Person\u003cem\u003e (Encounter Books, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMoral philosopher Gilbert Meilaender examines the question of human dignity and its place within political discourse. Because what we believe about human dignity influences what we believe should be done to and for people in society, Meilaender believes people need to be discussing what human dignity is in politics. Meilaender suggests that those in politics who wish to bracket that discussion because it seems to be concerning a religious or metaphysical question are fundamentally mistaken in their desire, not least because, regardless of whether or not they wish to recognize it, the religious or metaphysical question does influence their decision. This is something he saw repeatedly over the course of his membership on the President's Council on Bioethics. Meilaender goes on to describe two distinct ideas concerning human dignity which he believes are at work whenever people use the term; he then describes some of the reasons for confusion in American society concerning the dignity of the human person, including some developments in biotechnology.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"walker\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eJeanne Murray Walker\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"If every age allows poems, goes back to the poems, they find new things in them. I think that we just have to face the fact that there is such a thing as mystery. It's joyful, it's playful, it's full of excitement and you have to rest in that and trust in that rather than trusting in some paraphrase.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—Jeanne Murray Walker, author of \u003c\/em\u003eNew Tracks, Night Falling\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003ePoet Jeanne Murray Walker talks about learning to read poetry. Walker discusses some of the ways she helps students approach and appreciate poetry as the mysteriously meaningful literature it is, rather than as a linguistic cage containing static meaning to be abstracted from the words of the poem. The meaning is rooted in the metaphors in the poetry, which resonate in the imagination and eventually resolve as truth. The segment ends with a reading of selected poems from Walker's new book.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"lundin\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eRoger Lundin\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"It pits a woman with a vast, expansive inner life, filled with desire and a sense of possibility and self-discovery, but she lives in a natural world . . . that doesn't care one whit about her hopes, her dreams. Indeed, the doctor tells her that any hope, any dream, any sense of possibility that she has is simply an illusion.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—Roger Lundin, author of \u003c\/em\u003eBelieving Again: Doubt and Faith in a Secular Age\u003cem\u003e (Eerdmans, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eWhat makes Christian belief so implausible to non-believers? In this segment, Roger Lundin discusses his book \u003cem\u003eBelieving Again: Doubt and Faith in a Secular Age\u003c\/em\u003e. Distinctively modern unbelief is defined as a socially accepted and intellectually viable shift that saw faith in God as optional. Beginning in the seventeenth century, the romanticization of the human imagination resulted from the steady disenchantment of the world as rendered by the physical sciences and later the biological sciences. Lundin explains that this world seems increasingly indifferent to or even hostile to the world that human beings imagine, the world that they dream of and desire to live in. As an example of this in literature, he discusses the understanding of inner life and outward realities present in literature such as Kate Chopin’s \u003cem\u003eThe Awakening\u003c\/em\u003e and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s \u003cem\u003eThe Great Gatsby\u003c\/em\u003e. Lundin praises the imaginative possibilities in poetry and literature, but warns against the assumption that we all possess deep imaginations that are more powerful and meaningful than anything we could find in the natural world.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e•     •     •\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"hart\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eDavid Bentley Hart\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"The sort of atheism you get from the current group is so complacent and so lacking in any deep thought that it's sort of the \u003c\/em\u003ePeople \u003cem\u003emagazine approach to atheism, and so it has a certain marketability.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—David Bentley Hart, author of \u003c\/em\u003eAtheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and its Fashionable Enemies\u003cem\u003e (Yale University Press, 2009)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eDavid Bentley Hart discusses his book \u003cem\u003eAtheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and Its Fashionable Enemies\u003c\/em\u003e. Hart describes these delusions as a sense that the human race has been emancipated by agents of reason and tolerance. This is popularized atheism's founding myth, he says, and it’s captivating and easy to follow. Hart’s book exposes the falseness of this revisionist and self-serving modern myth in vivid detail. He lists these atheists' three basic arguments: 1) Empirical science is better able to explain existence than theology and metaphysics; 2) There are no rational grounds for belief and therefore it is of its nature contrary to reason; and 3) The history of Christianity is shown to be oppressive and cruel. Hart sees the first two arguments as basic category mistakes, and the third as nothing less than bad historical research. He concludes that the irrational moralism of these atheists has no basis in truth and is fundamentally incoherent.        \u003ca href=\"#guests\"\u003e\u003cstrong data-mce-fragment=\"1\"\u003e⇧\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}, "replace": { "published_at": "2009-09-01 14:57:59" } }
Volume 98

Guests on Volume 98

STANLEY HAUERWAS on the public witness of Fr. Richard John Neuhaus and on why Neuhaus abandoned his 1960s radicalism to become a leading “theoconservative”
CLARKE FORSYTHE on why prudence is a lost political virtue and on why and how the pro-life movement needs to broaden its educational efforts
GILBERT MEILAENDER on the necessity of a concept of human dignity and on why Americans no longer seem able to defend it
JEANNE MURRAY WALKER on how her students learn to understand poetry and on how metaphors are at the heart of poetic expression
ROGER LUNDIN on how the disenchantment of the world led to new forms of doubt and self-expression
DAVID BENTLEY HART on the feeble and confused arguments of the recent crop of outspoken atheists and on how a misunderstanding of the nature of freedom is at the heart of their revulsion at religion

This Volume is also available on CD

Click here to download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.

Stanley Hauerwas

"People forget that Richard was very prominent in the protests against [the] Vietnam [War]… and he assumed that when the Supreme Court decision about abortion was delivered, that the allies that he had had in the civil rights campaign and the anti-Vietnam campaign… would be allies against abortion. And he was stunned to discover that they thought the Supreme Court's abortion ruling was just fine, and that they supported it. And I think that's when Richard began to decisively shift his politics. That changed. He was no longer on the left. He was clearly on the right. And he was on the right for the same reasons he had been on the left, namely that's where he found the coalitions necessary to be in support of the dignity of life."

—Stanley Hauerwas

Theologian Stanley Hauerwas discusses the late Richard John Neuhaus, who passed away on January 8, 2009. Despite their, at times, deep disagreements, they shared a desire to keep the Church from succumbing to forms of cultural accommodation. Hauerwas comments on Neuhaus's extraordinary faith that gave him hope for the country in which he lived, hope that energized his labors of love in the public sphere. He reminds us that Neuhaus was an anti-war and pro-civil rights activist in the 1960s and 70s, and only came to be known as a conservative when abortion became legalized in 1973. It was a shock to Neuhaus that his allies in the anti-war movement and civil rights movement took the pro-choice side. Hauerwas observes that despite Neuhaus's more visible work in politics, Neuhaus had a fundamentally pastoral heart that showed in his personal relationships, his reflections on Scripture, and his pastoral writings.       

•     •     •

Clarke Forsythe

"Back in 1973, the Supreme Court assumed that abortion was safer than childbirth. . . . Today . . . we now know of the five best medically documented risks: heightened risk of pre-term birth, heightened risk of placenta previa, heightened incidence of drug and alcohol abuse, heightened incidence of suicide and psychiatric admission, and fifth, the loss of the protective effect of a first full-term pregnancy against breast cancer."

—Clarke Forsythe, author of Politics for the Greatest Good: The Case for Prudence in the Public Square (InverVarsity Press, 2009)

Clarke Forsythe explains the ways the pro-life movement in the United States can more wisely navigate politics in pursuit of its ends. He takes note of the fears and misgivings many people have concerning politics and the possibility of achieving good things without being morally compromising. The idea of compromise, Forsythe believes, is often misunderstood as moral failure in and of itself rather than a mutual concession to reach agreement on a limited good. Prudence, for Forsythe, is key. It requires an understanding of what is good but also the ability to act on that knowledge. He believes that educational efforts concerning pro-life issues should be targeted to the broad swath of "middle America" which is neither consistently pro-life nor pro-choice, but lean towards pro-life beliefs. As with slavery in the days of William Wilberforce, many Americans consider abortion to be a sort of "necessary evil"; Forsythe believes this sense of an evil's necessity is a key obstacle to reform, but that this obstacle can be overcome by bringing new knowledge into the public debate concerning the health problems and risks associated with abortion that medical science has learned over the past few decades.       

•     •     •

Gilbert Meilaender

"We remain committed to the equal dignity of persons . . . though it's not clear that we have a rationale any longer for that commitment to the equal personal dignity; historically, I think, the rationale was a religious one. And in public we try to get along without that these days, and I'm not altogether sure we can."

—Gilbert Meilaender, author of Neither Beast Nor God: The Dignity of the Human Person (Encounter Books, 2009)

Moral philosopher Gilbert Meilaender examines the question of human dignity and its place within political discourse. Because what we believe about human dignity influences what we believe should be done to and for people in society, Meilaender believes people need to be discussing what human dignity is in politics. Meilaender suggests that those in politics who wish to bracket that discussion because it seems to be concerning a religious or metaphysical question are fundamentally mistaken in their desire, not least because, regardless of whether or not they wish to recognize it, the religious or metaphysical question does influence their decision. This is something he saw repeatedly over the course of his membership on the President's Council on Bioethics. Meilaender goes on to describe two distinct ideas concerning human dignity which he believes are at work whenever people use the term; he then describes some of the reasons for confusion in American society concerning the dignity of the human person, including some developments in biotechnology.       

•     •     •

Jeanne Murray Walker

"If every age allows poems, goes back to the poems, they find new things in them. I think that we just have to face the fact that there is such a thing as mystery. It's joyful, it's playful, it's full of excitement and you have to rest in that and trust in that rather than trusting in some paraphrase."

—Jeanne Murray Walker, author of New Tracks, Night Falling (Eerdmans, 2009)

Poet Jeanne Murray Walker talks about learning to read poetry. Walker discusses some of the ways she helps students approach and appreciate poetry as the mysteriously meaningful literature it is, rather than as a linguistic cage containing static meaning to be abstracted from the words of the poem. The meaning is rooted in the metaphors in the poetry, which resonate in the imagination and eventually resolve as truth. The segment ends with a reading of selected poems from Walker's new book.       

•     •     •

Roger Lundin

"It pits a woman with a vast, expansive inner life, filled with desire and a sense of possibility and self-discovery, but she lives in a natural world . . . that doesn't care one whit about her hopes, her dreams. Indeed, the doctor tells her that any hope, any dream, any sense of possibility that she has is simply an illusion."

—Roger Lundin, author of Believing Again: Doubt and Faith in a Secular Age (Eerdmans, 2009)

What makes Christian belief so implausible to non-believers? In this segment, Roger Lundin discusses his book Believing Again: Doubt and Faith in a Secular Age. Distinctively modern unbelief is defined as a socially accepted and intellectually viable shift that saw faith in God as optional. Beginning in the seventeenth century, the romanticization of the human imagination resulted from the steady disenchantment of the world as rendered by the physical sciences and later the biological sciences. Lundin explains that this world seems increasingly indifferent to or even hostile to the world that human beings imagine, the world that they dream of and desire to live in. As an example of this in literature, he discusses the understanding of inner life and outward realities present in literature such as Kate Chopin’s The Awakening and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Lundin praises the imaginative possibilities in poetry and literature, but warns against the assumption that we all possess deep imaginations that are more powerful and meaningful than anything we could find in the natural world.       

•     •     •

David Bentley Hart

"The sort of atheism you get from the current group is so complacent and so lacking in any deep thought that it's sort of the People magazine approach to atheism, and so it has a certain marketability."

—David Bentley Hart, author of Atheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and its Fashionable Enemies (Yale University Press, 2009)

David Bentley Hart discusses his book Atheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and Its Fashionable Enemies. Hart describes these delusions as a sense that the human race has been emancipated by agents of reason and tolerance. This is popularized atheism's founding myth, he says, and it’s captivating and easy to follow. Hart’s book exposes the falseness of this revisionist and self-serving modern myth in vivid detail. He lists these atheists' three basic arguments: 1) Empirical science is better able to explain existence than theology and metaphysics; 2) There are no rational grounds for belief and therefore it is of its nature contrary to reason; and 3) The history of Christianity is shown to be oppressive and cruel. Hart sees the first two arguments as basic category mistakes, and the third as nothing less than bad historical research. He concludes that the irrational moralism of these atheists has no basis in truth and is fundamentally incoherent.       

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{ "product": {"id":4667071168575,"title":"Volume 97","handle":"mh-97-m","description":"\u003ca name=\"guests\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eGuests on Volume 97\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#noll\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMARK NOLL\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how Christian higher education is aided by a commitment to something like \u003cstrong\u003eChristendom\u003c\/strong\u003e, a commitment to the assumption that the Gospel has consequences for all of life and all of social experience\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003cstrong\u003e\u003ca href=\"#fish\"\u003eSTANLEY FISH\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003euniversity professors\u003c\/strong\u003e should refrain from bringing their own political, philosophical, and religious commitments into the classroom\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#peters\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eJAMES PETERS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how \u003cstrong\u003ePlato, Aristotle, Augustine, Pascal\u003c\/strong\u003e, and many others had an understanding of the nature and purpose of reason quite different from the common modern understanding\u003cbr\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#moore\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eSCOTT MOORE\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on cultivating an understanding of politics that goes beyond mere statecraft, and on the \u003cstrong\u003elimits of the notion of rights\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e• \u003ca href=\"#fujimura\"\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMAKOTO FUJIMURA\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e on how his work as a painter is enriched by writing, why artists need to cultivate an attentiveness to many things, and how \u003cstrong\u003evisual language\u003c\/strong\u003e expresses experience\u003cbr\u003e\u003cem\u003e\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ch5 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/mars-hill-audio.myshopify.com\/products\/mh-97-cd\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eThis Volume is also available on CD\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003eClick\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0069\/8449\/9263\/files\/MHAJ-097-Contents.pdf?v=1641757633\"\u003ehere\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eto download a pdf file with the contents listing and bibliographic information about this Volume.\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003ca name=\"noll\"\u003e\u003c\/a\u003e\n\u003ch3 style=\"text-align: center;\"\u003e\n\u003cstrong\u003e\u003cem\u003eMark Noll\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\n\u003c\/h3\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e\"At its best, the Christendom ideal argued, or took for granted, that everything held together in Christ.\"\u003c\/em\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: right;\"\u003e\u003cem\u003e—Mark Noll, author of \u003c\/em\u003eThe Future of Christian Learning: An Evangelical and Catholic Dialogue\u003cem\u003e (Brazos, 2008)\u003c\/em\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMark Noll shares his thoughts concerning the future of Christian education. As a historian, Noll sees how Christian education flourished in times of Christendom; he is careful to note he is not suggesting a return to the entirety of the political forms and institutions of that era would be desirable, but merely pointing out that the education of Christians — among other significant cultural institutions and achievements, including that of philosophy and music — flourished greatly during that time in part due to the support of the Christendom civilization. Specifically, Noll believes that those Christian groups and populations that have taken seriously the public implications of the gospel for all of creation and all of life and the continuity of the Church in history have been the populations that have best succeeded in developing social and educational institutions that strengthen the Church. Noll suggests there are signs that evangelicals, who have tended to be suspicious of institutions and relatively uninterested in history, are moving toward a recognition that pursuit of faithfulness requires attenti